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‘A Humpback Whale Tried to Eat Me’: Lobster Diver Survives Freak Attack in Cape Cod

Western Journal

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A Massachusetts diver looking for lobsters for others to eat almost became a meal himself.

Local lobster diver Michael Packard on Friday related what took place in the waters off the coast of Provincetown.

“I was lobster diving and A humpback whale tried to eat me. I was in his closed mouth for about 30 to 40 seconds before he rose to the surface and spit me out. I am very bruised up but have no broken bones,” he posted on a Provincetown community Facebook group page.

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After being rejected as a bit of breakfast, Packard was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, Massachusetts, and then released with what he called “a lot of soft tissue damage.”

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“All of a sudden, I felt this huge shove and the next thing I knew it was completely black,” Packard said on Friday, according to the Cape Cod Times.

“I could sense I was moving, and I could feel the whale squeezing with the muscles in his mouth.”

Packard’s first thought was that a great white shark had attacked him, but he felt no teeth and could sense no obvious wounds.

“I was completely inside; it was completely black,” Packard said.

“I thought to myself, ‘there’s no way I’m getting out of here. I’m done, I’m dead.’ All I could think of was my boys — they’re 12 and 15 years old.”

Wearing his scuba gear caused a bit of a struggle, as the whale decided that perhaps this was something less tasty than what he had expected.

Within 30 or 40 seconds, by Packard’s estimate, his chance came.

“I saw light, and he started throwing his head side to side, and the next thing I knew I was outside,” Packard said.

The diver’s sister, Cynthia Packard, said crew member Josiah Mayo saw the whale come to the surface.

“There was all this action at the top of the water,” Cynthia Packard said she was told. Then, she said, the whale appeared to spit out the lobster diver.

After the whale released Michael Packard, Mayo pulled him from the water, radioed in to shore and arranged for the diver to be taken to the hospital once they arrived back at the pier.

“Thank God, it wasn’t a white shark. He sees them all the time out there,” Cynthia Packard said. “He must have thought he was done.”

He did.

“I thought to myself: ‘OK this is it. I’m finally — I’m going to die,’” Michael Packard said, according to Boston.com.

One expert said the whale was probably young.

“Based on what was described, this would have to be a mistake and an accident on the part of the humpback,” said Jooke Robbins, director of Humpback Whale Studies at the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, according to the Cape Cod Times.

Mayo described the humpback as being medium-sized, Michael Packard said. Robbins believed it to be a juvenile feeding on sand lance.

“When a humpback opens its mouth to feed, it billows out like a parachute, blocking the animal’s forward vision, which is why so many become entangled in fishing gear in their mouth and jaws,” the outlet reported.

“It is not something I have heard happening before,” Robbins said. “So many things would have had to happen to end up in the path of a feeding whale.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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Family Escapes Through 2nd-Story Window During Armed Standoff After Suspect Barricades Door: Report

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On July 25, in Auburn, Alabama, a man reportedly put his family, his neighborhood, first responders and himself in a very dangerous position. Calls came into the Auburn Police District around 7:00 p.m. reporting a domestic violence incident in the Camden Ridge Subdivision. When police arrived, the man reportedly began firing at them with a handgun. Police fired back, and the man retreated into the home, where he also had his family trapped in a room. Thanks to the police and fire department coming together and working smarter instead of harder, the situation was resolved without injury to the family members trapped upstairs. It was firefighter Andrew Kiser, Chief of Police Cedric Anderson and Shift Supervisor Lt. Cody Hill who were responsible for carrying out the daring rescue that helped bring the threat to an end. While the shooter refused to exit the house, the men carried a ladder to the house and set it up to reach one of the second-story windows, where they learned the man’s family had been trapped. While Anderson held the ladder steady, Hill climbed the ladder and Kiser assisted the family as they climbed out of the window. With the family out of the way, Lee County SWAT was able to enter the house and capture the suspect. He was taken to Baptist Medical Center South after he was found to have sustained what appeared to be a gunshot wound. “Auburn PD Alerts: Heavy Police Activity in the Camden Ridge Subdivision, in the area of Wedgewood Ct.,” a public safety alert for the area read, according to WRBL-TV. “The scene is secure at this time, NO ONGOING THREAT.” Auburn Assistant Police Chief Clarence Stewart praised the efforts of all involved, highlighting how each group present played an important role in…

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After Receiving Call About Blazing Attic Fire, Police Rescue Man Trapped Inside Smoke-Filled Bedroom

Western Journal

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A family in Marlboro Township, New Jersey, woke up just before midnight on Sunday and sensed something was wrong. They called 911 at around 11:38 p.m., reporting a “possible fire at the residence,” according to The Journal NJ. Officers Ryan Anzalone, Donna Gonzalez, Michael Morgante and Colin Murray with the Marlboro Township Police Department were first on the scene and quickly assessed the situation. They found smoke pouring out of the attic, but were relieved to see the family appeared to have exited the home. After a short time, though, the family realized one of their members was not with them, and was likely still trapped inside on the second floor. Gonzalez and Anzalone charged in and found the man, as described, in a bedroom on the second floor. By the time they got there, the room was “completely filled with smoke,” but they managed to rescue the resident. The fire department had a difficult time accessing the home due to the long, narrow driveway and a large landscaping rock. “While enroute Chief 2-66 was advised of heavy smoke from the attic,” the Robertsville Volunteer Fire Co. #1 posted on Facebook. “At the time the mutual aid response plan was put in place and the box alarm was requested to bring in initial assistance.” “Upon the arrival of 2-66 Chief advised the house was located down a 180 foot narrow driveway. Once engine 2-75 arrived there was trouble accessing the house due to a large ornamental boulder and trees. Members of the engine and police moved the 400lb boulder so the engine could get to the house and attack the fire. “As the incident progressed, the second alarm mutual aid plan was requested for this deep seated, hard to access attic fire.” The two officers who…

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