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Amazon Weighs in on Legal Weed Ahead of Congressional Vote

Will the enormous corporation’s take on the subject sway lawmakers?

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Of all of the classic lines that we hear in Bob Dylan tunes, perhaps none is as quintessentially timeless as “the times, they are a’changin'”…especially now that the United States has moved from the industrial revolution, through a massive cultural revolution, and is now very much entrenched in a technological revolution that could continue for decades to come.

Amazon, one of the key barons of this digital revolution, is now weighing in on a subject that Bob Dylan would likely have had a few thoughts on himself – the legalization of marijuana – and doing so in a rather forceful way.

Amazon is throwing its weight behind federal legislation to legalize marijuana and pledging to no longer screen some of its workers for the drug.

In a blog post Tuesday, Amazon’s consumer boss, Dave Clark, said the company supports the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act, reintroduced in the House late last month. The MORE Act would decriminalize cannabis at the federal level, expunge criminal records and invest in impacted communities.

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“We hope that other employers will join us, and that policymakers will act swiftly to pass this law,” Clark wrote.

And that isn’t all…

Amazon said it would adjust its corporate drug testing policy for some of its workers. The company will no longer include marijuana in its drug screening program for any positions not regulated by the Department of Transportation, Clark said.

“In the past, like many employers, we’ve disqualified people from working at Amazon if they tested positive for marijuana use,” Clark said. “However, given where state laws are moving across the U.S., we’ve changed course.”

The tide has long been turning on this subject, as well over half of the states in our nation now allow for some form of legal or decriminalized pot, once again proving that ol’ Bob might have had it all figured out.

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FBI Backtracks After Unconscionable Statement on Synagogue Hostage Situation

Wonder what took them so long?

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Earlier this week, the FBI caught a great deal of deserved flak over a ridiculously obtuse assessment of a nearly disastrous situation, and now they’re attempting to backtrack heavily.

It all began after the brother of one of the world’s most notorious terrorists took several people hostage at a synagogue in Texas, and on Saturday, no less.  Thankfully, the situation resolved with no innocent persons being killed, and only the perpetrator losing his life in the process.

But the FBI’s original assessment of the situation appeared to suggest that the targeting of a synagogue by a Radical Islamic sympathizer was somehow not a matter of antisemitism.  Twitter was soon full of angsty, shocked posts, blasting the FBI for their inability to see the forest for the trees.

Now, the Bureau is backtracking.  Big time.

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Malik Faisal Akram, the British national who was killed Saturday night after allegedly taking four people hostage inside a Texas synagogue, spoke “repeatedly” about a convicted terrorist during negotiations with law enforcement, according to an FBI statement obtained by Fox News.

The statement, which was released late Sunday, does not identify the terrorist serving an 86-year prison sentence in the U.S. on terrorism charges, but may shed new light on a possible motive.

Akram could be heard on a Facebook livestream demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani neuroscientist suspected of having ties to al Qaeda who was convicted of trying to kill U.S. Army officers in Afghanistan.

“This is a terrorism-related matter, in which the Jewish community was targeted, and is being investigated by the Joint Terrorism Task Force,” the statement read.

The sudden change of tone may be a day late and a buck short, however, as this isn’t the first time that the FBI has engaged in such boneheaded behavior of late.

 

Earlier this week, the FBI caught a great deal of deserved flak over a ridiculously obtuse assessment of a nearly disastrous situation, and now they’re attempting to backtrack heavily. It all began after the brother of one of the world’s most notorious terrorists took several people hostage at a synagogue in Texas, and on Saturday, no less.  Thankfully, the situation resolved with no innocent persons being killed, and only the perpetrator losing his life in the process. But the FBI’s original assessment of the situation appeared to suggest that the targeting of a synagogue by a Radical Islamic sympathizer was somehow not a matter of antisemitism.  Twitter was soon full of angsty, shocked posts, blasting the FBI for their inability to see the forest for the trees. Now, the Bureau is backtracking.  Big time. Malik Faisal Akram, the British national who was killed Saturday night after allegedly taking four people hostage inside a Texas synagogue, spoke “repeatedly” about a convicted terrorist during negotiations with law enforcement, according to an FBI statement obtained by Fox News. The statement, which was released late Sunday, does not identify the terrorist serving an 86-year prison sentence in the U.S. on terrorism charges, but may shed new light on a possible motive. Akram could be heard on a Facebook livestream demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani neuroscientist suspected of having ties to al Qaeda who was convicted of trying to kill U.S. Army officers in Afghanistan. “This is a terrorism-related matter, in which the Jewish community was targeted, and is being investigated by the Joint Terrorism Task Force,” the statement read. The sudden change of tone may be a day late and a buck short, however, as this isn’t the first time that the FBI has engaged in such boneheaded behavior of late.…

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UFC Chief Laments Lack of Available Monoclonal COVID Treatments

This, just days after Florida accused the federal government of hoarding the life-saving treatments.

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If you were to ask the government about the options that we have for defeating the coronavirus pandemic, you are likely to hear but one side of the story:  Vaccines.

The Biden administration has been unwavering in their support of these inoculations, even going so far as to attempt to install a constitutionally unsound vaccine mandate that took only two months for the Supreme Court to gut.

But there are other options too, induing the widely popular and effective monoclonal antibody treatments.  And, despite the government’s insistence on pushing vaccines on the masses, the Biden administration has also appeared to corner the market on these life-saving medicines…and they’re being awfully stingy with them.

“I bet I could get some f*****g pain pills quicker than I could get monoclonal antibodies,” UFC President Dana White said in regards to the rationing of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of COVID-19 during a press conference on Saturday following the UFC 45 Vegas in Las Vegas, NV.

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MMA Weekly asked White about a left-wing censorship campaign targeting Joe Rogan under the auspices of “misinformation” involving an “open letter” from assorted medical professionals and academic calling on Spotify, the distributor or Rogan’s eponymous podcast, to “take action” against what they described as “mass-misinformation” which is “medically and culturally dangerous.”

The exchange was lively to say the least.

MMA Weekly asked, “I was wondering what your thoughts were with the 200-plus doctors trying to put pressure on Spotify saying that Joe’s a menace.”

White replied, “Are they really? Well how about this, ever since I came out and said what I did, It’s almost impossible now to get monoclonal antibodies. They’re making it so you can’t get them — medicine that absolutely works, they’re keeping from us. I don’t want to get too political and start getting into all this s***, but ivermectin and monoclonal antibodies have been around for a long time. Now, all of a sudden, you can’t dig them up to save your life. The doctors won’t give them to you.”

The criticism arrives amid a flurry of complaints from Florida officials, complaining that the Biden administration simply will not ship these treatments to them, and without providing any reason as to why.

If you were to ask the government about the options that we have for defeating the coronavirus pandemic, you are likely to hear but one side of the story:  Vaccines. The Biden administration has been unwavering in their support of these inoculations, even going so far as to attempt to install a constitutionally unsound vaccine mandate that took only two months for the Supreme Court to gut. But there are other options too, induing the widely popular and effective monoclonal antibody treatments.  And, despite the government’s insistence on pushing vaccines on the masses, the Biden administration has also appeared to corner the market on these life-saving medicines…and they’re being awfully stingy with them. “I bet I could get some f*****g pain pills quicker than I could get monoclonal antibodies,” UFC President Dana White said in regards to the rationing of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of COVID-19 during a press conference on Saturday following the UFC 45 Vegas in Las Vegas, NV. MMA Weekly asked White about a left-wing censorship campaign targeting Joe Rogan under the auspices of “misinformation” involving an “open letter” from assorted medical professionals and academic calling on Spotify, the distributor or Rogan’s eponymous podcast, to “take action” against what they described as “mass-misinformation” which is “medically and culturally dangerous.” The exchange was lively to say the least. MMA Weekly asked, “I was wondering what your thoughts were with the 200-plus doctors trying to put pressure on Spotify saying that Joe’s a menace.” White replied, “Are they really? Well how about this, ever since I came out and said what I did, It’s almost impossible now to get monoclonal antibodies. They’re making it so you can’t get them — medicine that absolutely works, they’re keeping from us. I don’t want to get too political and start getting into…

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