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Annapolis Newspaper Shooting Motive: What We Know So Far

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The nation has been shaken once again by news of another mass shooting, this time at an Annapolis newspaper building.

Armed with a shotgun and smoke grenades, the gunman stormed the newsroom of the Capital Gazette newspaper on Thursday afternoon, killing five.

It didn’t take long for police to identify the gunman, a 39-year-old man who had sued the paper in 2012 for defamation and reportedly had a “vendetta” against the outlet, having made several threats in the past.

Note: I have chosen not to use the shooter’s name or face, as research has shown excessive media focus on the identity of mass shooters can inspire copycats. 

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The Daily Wire’s Ryan Saavedra breaks down what we know so far:

NBC News’ Tom Winter reported on Twitter that the shooter had a history with the newspaper, having sued them in 2012 for defamation.

The Capital Gazette reported in 2015 that the suspect’s lawsuit against the newspaper had been thrown out by a judge because “the article was based on public records and [the suspect] presented no evidence it was inaccurate.”

The Capital Gazette reported at the time:

[The suspect], who represented himself, appealed the decision to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, which upheld Lamasney’s ruling in an opinion filed Thursday.

“A lawyer would almost certainly have told him not to proceed with this case,” the court wrote. “It reveals a fundamental failure to understand what defamation law is and, more particularly, what defamation law is not.”

While the suspect’s mental health has not been addressed, one can imagine, as is common with those representing themselves in court, he is unstable.

He reportedly damaged his fingers so police could not identify him; they resorted to facial recognition instead.

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American Missionaries, Including Children, Kidnapped in Haiti

The FBI has now gotten involved as well.

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There is once again trouble in the unsettled streets of Haiti, and this time there are American lives at stake.

As the tiny island nation continues to suffer from unrest and an unhealthy escalation of gang-related violence, a number of American missionaries from Ohio have been kidnapped.

A group of 17 U.S. missionaries including children was kidnapped by a gang in Haiti on Saturday, according to a voice message sent to various religious missions by an organization with direct knowledge of the incident.

The missionaries were on their way home from building an orphanage, according to a message from Ohio-based Christian Aid Ministries.

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“This is a special prayer alert,” the one-minute message said. “Pray that the gang members would come to repentance.”

The message says the mission’s field director is working with the U.S. Embassy, and that the field director’s family and one other unidentified man stayed at the ministry’s base while everyone else visited the orphanage.

On Tuesday, it was revealed that the FBI had gotten involved, and other entities within the federal government were doing all they could to help.

The State Department said Sunday its officials have been in “regular contact” with Haitian authorities “and will continue to work with them and interagency partners” to recover the group, a spokesperson told ABC News. The U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince is leading coordination with local authorities and providing assistance to the families, Psaki added.

The Haitian government suspects the gang known as 400 Mawozo to be responsible for the abductions, according to a source at the Haitian presidential office.

Haiti’s gang violence has now cemented the nation as the kidnapping capital of the world, with over 600 such crimes having occurred there in 2021 alone.

 

There is once again trouble in the unsettled streets of Haiti, and this time there are American lives at stake. As the tiny island nation continues to suffer from unrest and an unhealthy escalation of gang-related violence, a number of American missionaries from Ohio have been kidnapped. A group of 17 U.S. missionaries including children was kidnapped by a gang in Haiti on Saturday, according to a voice message sent to various religious missions by an organization with direct knowledge of the incident. The missionaries were on their way home from building an orphanage, according to a message from Ohio-based Christian Aid Ministries. “This is a special prayer alert,” the one-minute message said. “Pray that the gang members would come to repentance.” The message says the mission’s field director is working with the U.S. Embassy, and that the field director’s family and one other unidentified man stayed at the ministry’s base while everyone else visited the orphanage. On Tuesday, it was revealed that the FBI had gotten involved, and other entities within the federal government were doing all they could to help. The State Department said Sunday its officials have been in “regular contact” with Haitian authorities “and will continue to work with them and interagency partners” to recover the group, a spokesperson told ABC News. The U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince is leading coordination with local authorities and providing assistance to the families, Psaki added. The Haitian government suspects the gang known as 400 Mawozo to be responsible for the abductions, according to a source at the Haitian presidential office. Haiti’s gang violence has now cemented the nation as the kidnapping capital of the world, with over 600 such crimes having occurred there in 2021 alone.  

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Southwest Airlines Hit by Major Employee Protest Over Vaccine Mandate

And just one week after a mysterious mass cancelation of flights.

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Just a week ago, Southwest Airlines was in the midst of a massive and troublesome cancelation of flights, with some estimates suggesting that nearly one third of the company’s entire fleet was grounded.

Southwest was quick in trying to get out ahead of the controversy, blaming weather and air traffic control issues for the massive trouble, but astute researchers were quick to point out that ATC hadn’t suggested anything of the sort on their end, and that the percentage of all canceled flights that belonged to Southwest was indicative of a problem within the airline itself.

Many began to suggest that the airline was suffering from the fallout of their coming vaccine mandate, and new evidence this week seems to refute the company’s claim to the contrary.

Current and former Southwest Airlines workers gathered to protest recent COVID-19 vaccination mandates on Monday, Oct. 18.

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They gathered to celebrate “medical freedom” at the airline’s headquarters in Dallas.

Chopper 11 flew over the group of hundreds of people holding signs that said, “Terminate the mandate,” “freedom not force” and “no jabs for jobs,”

Southwest set its deadline the first week of October under a federal vaccination mandate for employees of companies holding contracts with the U.S. government. But workers can seek medical or religious exemptions. Workers have until late November to comply with the vaccine mandate.

Employers who have embraced vaccine mandates have suffered greatly in recent weeks, as Americans continue to exercise their right to bodily sovereignty in the face of growing pressure to receive the jab.

Just a week ago, Southwest Airlines was in the midst of a massive and troublesome cancelation of flights, with some estimates suggesting that nearly one third of the company’s entire fleet was grounded. Southwest was quick in trying to get out ahead of the controversy, blaming weather and air traffic control issues for the massive trouble, but astute researchers were quick to point out that ATC hadn’t suggested anything of the sort on their end, and that the percentage of all canceled flights that belonged to Southwest was indicative of a problem within the airline itself. Many began to suggest that the airline was suffering from the fallout of their coming vaccine mandate, and new evidence this week seems to refute the company’s claim to the contrary. Current and former Southwest Airlines workers gathered to protest recent COVID-19 vaccination mandates on Monday, Oct. 18. They gathered to celebrate “medical freedom” at the airline’s headquarters in Dallas. Chopper 11 flew over the group of hundreds of people holding signs that said, “Terminate the mandate,” “freedom not force” and “no jabs for jobs,” Southwest set its deadline the first week of October under a federal vaccination mandate for employees of companies holding contracts with the U.S. government. But workers can seek medical or religious exemptions. Workers have until late November to comply with the vaccine mandate. Employers who have embraced vaccine mandates have suffered greatly in recent weeks, as Americans continue to exercise their right to bodily sovereignty in the face of growing pressure to receive the jab.

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