Connect with us

Wire

Biden Raises More Questions About His Mental State by Twice Forgetting Name of His Employee

Western Journal

Published

on

By this point, Americans have grown used to repeated gaffes from President Joe Biden. In recent weeks, though, Biden’s blunders seem to have become even more consistent.

On Wednesday, Biden was attempting to thank John Porcari, his so-called “special envoy for ports,” for his work in attempting to address the current supply chain problems.

Twice in the span of about six seconds, Biden called Porcari by the wrong first name.

“I especially want to thank Joe Porcari, and I think Joe’s done one heck of a job,” Biden said.

To be fair, Biden’s own first name is Joe, and that’s pretty close to John. I’m sure that can get confusing.

Joking aside, though, this is yet another worrying gaffe. It is difficult as a human being not to feel concerned about Biden’s health.

In addition, Biden’s ever-increasing blunders should raise questions about his ability to lead the country.

In the same speech yesterday, Biden winced in apparent agony as he struggled and ultimately failed to pronounce the name of Mario Cordero, the executive director of the Port of Long Beach.

Just last week, Biden mumbled a virtually indiscernible word salad during a speech in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. Fox News apparently caught the moment on air by complete accident.

And only a few days before that, Biden bumbled for 20 straight seconds about underground gasoline at the turn of the century.

Biden’s gaffes continue to be wildly concerning, but the establishment media continues to ignore them.

In addition to botching Porcari’s name, Biden also painted a misleading picture of the job he has done. Since being named Biden’s port envoy on Aug. 27, Porcari has failed to make significant progress in the supply chain crisis.

According to the New York Post, a backlog of about 100 cargo ships has been in Los Angeles for over a month. Biden announced the clogged port will now stay open 24/7, but his administration admitted problems will probably linger for months.

“There will be things that people can’t get,” a senior White House staffer said regarding Christmas shopping.

Are you concerned about President Biden's mental fitness?

“At the same time, a lot of these goods are hopefully substitutable by other things. … I don’t think there’s any real reason to be panicked, but we all feel the frustration and there’s a certain need for patience to help get through a relatively short period of time.”

Biden is unable to speak either clearly or accurately.

For the good of both his personal health and the country, it is time to assess this problem in a professional manner.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Wire

NYT Writer Argues Adoption More ‘Dangerous and Potentially Traumatic’ Than Abortion in Op-Ed

Western Journal

Published

on

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which centers around Mississippi’s ban on most abortions after the fifteenth week of pregnancy.

With a conservative majority in the Court, the right’s pipe dream of overturning Roe v. Wade, or at least rolling back abortion rights, appears to be within reach. Naturally, this development has escalated the public debate over what is, arguably, the most divisive issue of our time.

An op-ed in The New York Times written by Elizabeth Spiers, a Democratic digital strategist who was adopted as an infant, argues that adoption is “infinitely more difficult, expensive, dangerous and potentially traumatic than terminating a pregnancy during its early stages.”

She criticizes Justice Amy Coney Barrett for suggesting that “adoption is some kind of idyllic fairy tale.” Spiers writes, “My own adoption actually was what many would consider idyllic. I was raised by two adoptive parents, Alice and Terry, from the time I was an infant, and grew up in a home where I knew every day that I was loved. A few years ago, I found my biological mother, Maria, and three siblings I didn’t know I had via a DNA test and Facebook.”

take our poll - story continues below

Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?

  • Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

“The first time I spoke to Maria on the phone — she lives in Alabama, not too far from my parents, and I live in Brooklyn — she apologized repeatedly for giving me up and told me she loved me and that I would always be family. ‘You are blood,’ she would say later. I told her, and continue to tell her, every time she brings it up, that the apology is unnecessary. I had a wonderful childhood and I believe she had made the right decision. But she remains heartbroken about the years we missed together.”

Spiers “resent[s] being used as a political football by the right. I believe that abortion is a form of health care and that every woman should have access to it if she needs it … I resent it on behalf of Maria, who found the choice she made traumatizing and still feels that pain, 44 years later.”

Does Spiers think Maria would be less traumatized if she had aborted her?

Maria had several children already and felt it would be too difficult financially and perhaps emotionally to raise another child, so she delivered Spiers and turned her over to parents who could (and did) offer her a childhood of abundance and attention.

Does Spiers op-ed convince you that having an abortion is easier than suffering through the trauma associated with adoption?

I would argue that Maria’s heartbreak would be greater if she’d opted to abort Spiers.

I know several women who had abortions with men they later married and raised families with. Each has told me they often think about the child who would have been their first born.

Spiers continues: “While pregnant, they will undergo the bonding with a child that happens by biological design as an embryo develops into a living, breathing, conscious human. And then that child will be taken away.”

“The right likes to suggest that abortion is a traumatic experience for women — a last resort, a painful memory. But adoption is often just as traumatic as the right thinks abortion is, if not more so, as a woman has to relinquish not a lump of cells but a fully formed baby she has lived with for nine months. I’m a mother myself … As anyone who has gestated a human will tell you, there is a vast difference between the fourth week of pregnancy and the 40th.”

I have three children. Rather than viewing them as “a lump of cells” in the early months of pregnancy, I was awestruck by the knowledge that a new life was growing within me. And that was long before I felt the first little flutters of movement, the point at which Spiers believes “a kind of biological brainwashing” begins which “happens whether you want to be a parent or not.”

FYI, Ms. Spiers, most women would call it bonding or even love, rather than “a kind of biological brainwashing.”

“She [Justice Coney Barrett] blithely seems to assume that a mother can simply choose not to bond with the child she’s gestating solely on the basis that she is not ready to be a mother or believes that she is unable to provide for the child,” Spiers continues.

The mother/child bond is real, and I would argue it starts long before quickening begins. Is it really easier to end that life than to deliver the child and give them to parents who yearn for a child and have the financial means to provide for them?

“The trauma doesn’t just affect mothers, either,” she writes. “Researchers have a term for what children who are adopted, even as infants, may suffer from later in life: relinquishment trauma. The premise is that babies bond with their mothers in utero and become familiar with their behaviors. When their first caretaker is not the biological mother, they register the difference, and the stress of it has lasting effects.”

Ms. Spiers, we all experience some form of trauma in this life. Truth be told, many who have been raised by their biological parents have experienced trauma and would have been far better off being raised by adoptive parents who truly welcomed parenthood and loved them.

During his 1992 presidential campaign, former President Bill Clinton said, “Abortion should be safe, legal and rare.” While the number of abortions in the U.S. has declined since that time, Democrats have pushed for unlimited access to abortions, with state lawmakers in New York and Virginia fighting for late term, partial-birth and even taxpayer funded abortion.

Then-New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo was so delighted after his state’s passage of the Reproductive Health Act in Jan. 2019, which expands abortion rights, that he ordered the One World Trade Center building, two major bridges in the state and the Alfred E. Smith Building in Albany, to be lit up with pink lights, according to The Washington Times.

Yes, they were celebrating a new law which eliminated “most of the state’s previous restrictions on abortions after 24 weeks,” legalizing the most heinous and cruel procedures conceivable to kill babies.

Ms. Spiers should consider the trauma experienced by the victims of these procedures. And perhaps the trauma of the mother after the reality of what she just allowed a doctor to do to her child sinks in.

Sorry Ms. Spiers, the argument that killing a child in the womb (or even out of the womb as some states now allow), simply because life is difficult and potentially full of suffering, is sheer madness.

In a lengthy Twitter thread, conservative podcast host Ben Shapiro savages Spiers op-ed in his signature fashion. It’s worth a read.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which centers around Mississippi’s ban on most abortions after the fifteenth week of pregnancy. With a conservative majority in the Court, the right’s pipe dream of overturning Roe v. Wade, or at least rolling back abortion rights, appears to be within reach. Naturally, this development has escalated the public debate over what is, arguably, the most divisive issue of our time. An op-ed in The New York Times written by Elizabeth Spiers, a Democratic digital strategist who was adopted as an infant, argues that adoption is “infinitely more difficult, expensive, dangerous and potentially traumatic than terminating a pregnancy during its early stages.” She criticizes Justice Amy Coney Barrett for suggesting that “adoption is some kind of idyllic fairy tale.” Spiers writes, “My own adoption actually was what many would consider idyllic. I was raised by two adoptive parents, Alice and Terry, from the time I was an infant, and grew up in a home where I knew every day that I was loved. A few years ago, I found my biological mother, Maria, and three siblings I didn’t know I had via a DNA test and Facebook.” “The first time I spoke to Maria on the phone — she lives in Alabama, not too far from my parents, and I live in Brooklyn — she apologized repeatedly for giving me up and told me she loved me and that I would always be family. ‘You are blood,’ she would say later. I told her, and continue to tell her, every time she brings it up, that the apology is unnecessary. I had a wonderful childhood and I believe she had made the right decision. But she remains heartbroken about the years we missed together.”…

Continue Reading

Wire

Bob Dole, GOP Icon and Former Republican Presidential Candidate, Dead at 98

Western Journal

Published

on

Bob Dole, the Republican senator and former presidential candidate who survived a grievous combat wound in World War II to personify the grit and dedication of the “Greatest Generation” in politics and in life, has died.

He was 98 years old.

“It is with heavy hearts we announce that Senator Robert Joseph Dole died early this morning in his sleep,” the Elizabeth Dole Foundation announced on Twitter. “At his death, at age 98, he had served the United States of America faithfully for 79 years.”

take our poll - story continues below

Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?

  • Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

In February, Dole revealed that he had been diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer and said he was starting treatment, according to NBC.

The Republican from Kansas served in the Senate from 1969 through 1996. He was the GOP’s candidate for the presidency in 1996, losing to then-President Bill Clinton.

In 1976, Dole was then-President Gerald Ford’s vice-presidential running when Ford lost to Democrat Jimmy Carter.

In January 2018, he received a Congressional Gold Medal.

“I want to thank all those who’ve said such kind words about me,” Dole said at the time according to NBC, joking, “They’re probably not true, but they were nice.”

Dole was badly wounded in combat in Italy in 1945, leaving him with limited function in his left arm and none in his right.

Dole led the campaign to raise the $170 million for the World War II Memorial that opened in 2004 in Washington.

In 2018, even when using a wheelchair, Dole greeted each veteran coming to the memorial.

“It’s just about the one public service left that I’m doing,” Dole said then, according to The Washington Post.

Does America need more heroes like Bob Dole?

“We don’t have many of the World War II vets left. It’s important to me.”

“I tell them it doesn’t matter where you’re from, what war you served in, whether you were wounded or not wounded,” Dole said then, according to the Post’s account, which was filled with vignettes of Dole meeting others who had served. “We’re all in this together.”

Dole’s war record was recalled by The New York Times in its obituary, noting, “As the old soldiers of World War II faded away, Mr. Dole, who had been a lieutenant in the Army’s storied 10th Mountain Division and was wounded so severely on a battlefield that he was left for dead, came to personify the resilience of his generation.”

Dole enlisted in 1943. Recovery from his wound would take three years.

The Times noted words said about Dole by the late Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona in a 1996 campaign stop.

“This is the last crusade of a great warrior,” McCain said then. “A member of a generation of Americans who went out and made the world safe for democracy so that we could have lives that were far better for ourselves and for our children.”

According to the Times, Dole’s survivors include his wife, Elizabeth Dole, a former North Carolina senator and former secretary of transportation, and a daughter, Robin Dole.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Bob Dole, the Republican senator and former presidential candidate who survived a grievous combat wound in World War II to personify the grit and dedication of the “Greatest Generation” in politics and in life, has died. He was 98 years old. “It is with heavy hearts we announce that Senator Robert Joseph Dole died early this morning in his sleep,” the Elizabeth Dole Foundation announced on Twitter. “At his death, at age 98, he had served the United States of America faithfully for 79 years.” It is with heavy hearts we announce that Senator Robert Joseph Dole died early this morning in his sleep. At his death, at age 98, he had served the United States of America faithfully for 79 years. More information coming soon. #RememberingBobDole pic.twitter.com/57NtGfqtmL — Elizabeth Dole Foundation (@DoleFoundation) December 5, 2021 In February, Dole revealed that he had been diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer and said he was starting treatment, according to NBC. The Republican from Kansas served in the Senate from 1969 through 1996. He was the GOP’s candidate for the presidency in 1996, losing to then-President Bill Clinton. In 1976, Dole was then-President Gerald Ford’s vice-presidential running when Ford lost to Democrat Jimmy Carter. Bob Dole was the type of man who at 96, unable to walk and struggling badly with his health, wanted to be held up so he could salute the casket of a fellow WWII veteran and former president pic.twitter.com/udvVDSYg17 — Sunny McSunnyface (@sunnyright) December 5, 2021 In January 2018, he received a Congressional Gold Medal. “I want to thank all those who’ve said such kind words about me,” Dole said at the time according to NBC, joking, “They’re probably not true, but they were nice.” Dole was badly wounded in combat in Italy in 1945, leaving him with limited…

Continue Reading
The Schaftlein Report

Latest Articles

Best of the Week