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Camera Shows Dozens of NFL Players Gather at Midfield to Take a Knee – But for Prayer, Not Protest

Western Journal

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At first glance, it was just one more snippet of the social justice shenanigans that have become a hallmark of the National Football League.

But the photos tweeted by Pittsburgh Steelers chaplain Kent Chevalier show members of the Steelers and Buffalo Bills in a midfield prayer circle.

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Pittsburgh won Sunday’s game 23-16.

Chevalier, however, tweeted that there is a lot more than the score that matters.

“If you do it God’s way, then you’ll be successful no matter the outcome. Success is not always based on the physical OUTCOME. Success is always based on spiritual OBEDIENCE. Success = Obedience,” he tweeted.

Prayer is not uncommon in the Pittsburgh locker room, Chevalier told Sports Spectrum.

The chaplain noted the team has even prayed in the showers in moments leading up to games, when players are suited up in their game-day uniforms and prepared to take the field.

“Game faces on and they are holding hands in the shower, which I just thought was hilarious,” Chevalier said. “It’s like, ‘Oh my gosh, I never thought of this, that I’d be holding hands in the shower with a guy and we’re praying to the Lord.’”

Chevalier said in an interview with Steelers Takeaways that when he speaks to players, he tells them “they are playing for God’s glory, not for the name on the back of their jerseys.”

He said that there are many private moments with players.

“In the Scripture, there is a person, Nicodemus, who was a guy that only would visit Jesus late at night. He didn’t want anyone to know he was talking to Jesus. Well, I love my Nicodemus moments with players. Some guys don’t want to be seen with me. I’ll get late-night texts or calls asking to meet me at night to talk about things by the pool at the hotel,” he said.

That’s where most of my ministry is done – those Nicodemus moments.”

Chevalier added that his role with the team has its limits.

“I’m here to love and serve you. My job is not to push my faith on you, but to be open and communicate with you. I’m here if you are having a hard time no matter your faith. I’m not here to be a Bible thumper. I’m here to be loving to you,” he said.

He also said his job is a dream come true for a Steelers fan.

I was a Steelers fan my entire life. I could tell you where I was when the Steelers won the Super Bowl in Detroit. As a huge fan of the Steelers growing up in Pittsburgh, this had been incredible. I am truly blessed,” he said.

“I am so happy to be able to do this for the Steelers family, and for Steelers nation. And to be able to help players use their platform to share their faith, I am truly blessed.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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Small Ranchers Band Together to Seize Control Back from Beef Industry Megacorporations

Western Journal

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There is nothing more American than that moment when the guys at the bottom send a message to the guys at the top: We’re changing the rules.

So it is in the cattle industry, where ranchers who have been getting less and less are now uniting to build meat packing plants, according to Fox News.

Since the 1970s, four companies have had a stranglehold on the beef industry by running slaughterhouses that process more than 80 percent of the country’s cattle.

Ranchers, who in the 1970s got 35 cents out of every dollar consumers spent on food, now get 14 cents.

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Consumers got a glimpse of the impact of consolidation earlier this year when meat packing giant JBS stopped operations at 13 plants after a cyberattack, according to CBS. The company ended up forking over about $11 million in order to resume operations.

Rancher Rusty Kemp of Nebraska said he and others decided it was time to quit complaining and start competing.

“We’ve been complaining about it for 30 years,” Kemp told Fox. “It’s probably time somebody does something about it.”

This fall, a dream that was $300 million in the making will take shape as construction begins on the Sustainable Beef plant on nearly 400 acres near North Platte, Nebraska.

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is a fan, saying ranchers and consumers both win.

“Ranchers have been getting screwed long enough, it is time we fight back. This is how we do it, we go head to head with the big processors,” he said.

Kemp said the project will bring growth to the region with a plant expected to employ about 900 people.

“If we are going to grow this economy, it needs to be through added value agriculture,” Kemp said, according to KNOP-TV. “We need to take the ag products we produce in Lincoln County and the surrounding area – the North Platte trade area, and add value to it. That’s how we grow our economy here.”

Even the Biden administration has raised questions. White House National Economic Council Director Brian Deese said price hikes for meat may have been driven by profiteering, according to the New York Post.

“It raises a concern about pandemic profiteering, about companies that are driving price increases in a way that hurts consumers who are going to the grocery store,” Deese said last month

David Briggs, the CEO of Sustainable Beef, said the battle will not be easy, but he is up for it.

“Cattle people are risk-takers and they’re ready to take a risk,” Briggs told Fox News.

Chad Tentinger, who is working to unite cattle ranchers and build a Cattlemen’s Heritage plant near Council Bluffs, Iowa, said he thinks the small ranchers can beat the big guys.

“We want to revolutionize the plant and make it an attractive place to work,” he said.

More modern facilities and better pay are two of the pieces they hope will let them compete.

Derrell Peel, an agricultural economist at Oklahoma State University, said bigger plants historically have greater efficiency, which means lower costs.

“We have these very large plants because they’re extremely efficient,” Peel said.

But Kemp said he will give it a try.

“The market is what it is, and it provides opportunities as well as challenges,” Kemp said, according to the North Platte Telegraph.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

There is nothing more American than that moment when the guys at the bottom send a message to the guys at the top: We’re changing the rules. So it is in the cattle industry, where ranchers who have been getting less and less are now uniting to build meat packing plants, according to Fox News. Since the 1970s, four companies have had a stranglehold on the beef industry by running slaughterhouses that process more than 80 percent of the country’s cattle. Ranchers, who in the 1970s got 35 cents out of every dollar consumers spent on food, now get 14 cents. Consumers got a glimpse of the impact of consolidation earlier this year when meat packing giant JBS stopped operations at 13 plants after a cyberattack, according to CBS. The company ended up forking over about $11 million in order to resume operations. Rancher Rusty Kemp of Nebraska said he and others decided it was time to quit complaining and start competing. “We’ve been complaining about it for 30 years,” Kemp told Fox. “It’s probably time somebody does something about it.” This fall, a dream that was $300 million in the making will take shape as construction begins on the Sustainable Beef plant on nearly 400 acres near North Platte, Nebraska. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is a fan, saying ranchers and consumers both win. “Ranchers have been getting screwed long enough, it is time we fight back. This is how we do it, we go head to head with the big processors,” he said. Kemp said the project will bring growth to the region with a plant expected to employ about 900 people. “If we are going to grow this economy, it needs to be through added value agriculture,” Kemp said, according to KNOP-TV. “We need to take the…

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Mandate Abolished? DeSantis, Republican Governors Boldly Vow to Take On Biden

Western Journal

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The Biden administration’s vaccine mandate for companies with over 100 employees through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is expected to be put in place soon, and Republican governors around the country are prepared to take legal action against the measure.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis made it clear that his state will be suing the administration for the invasive policy.

“I think that the mandate is going to lose in court,” he said at a news conference Thursday. According to Fox News, a lawsuit from the state would be filed through the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

“No one should lose their job over these shots. I think we want to protect people’s jobs,” DeSantis said. “These are folks that have been working throughout this whole time, they were put in situations where they were exposing themselves to risk knowingly to help others, and we did that, and we considered them heroes just a year ago.

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“Now, you’re gonna let them go by the wayside?”

In Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott took preventive action by signing an executive order banning a requirement for vaccines by any person or group in the public or private sector.

“No entity in Texas can compel receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine by any individual, including an employee or a consumer, who objects to such vaccination for any reason of personal conscience, based on a religious belief, or for medical reasons, including prior recovery from COVID-19,” the order states, directly bucking both President Joe Biden and companies that want to mandate the coronavirus vaccine.

A criticism of Abbott’s order is that is interferes with the freedom of private businesses to determine health guidelines for their employees, which explains why many Republican governors are not considering that level of action.

Regardless, there is almost uniform consensus from conservative state leaders that the government should not be forcing the vaccine onto the public through employers.

An example of the nuanced difference between Abbott’s approach and other governors was articulated in Republican Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt’s remarks earlier this week about the imminent mandate.

“This action is not just federal overreach, it’s unconstitutional,” Stitt said. “I’ve talked this over with Attorney General John O’Connor, and I know he’s on our side. He’s ready to take President Biden to court the second the rules are made public.”

“I don’t believe it’s the government’s job to dictate policies to private companies. Just as I believe Joe Biden can’t tell businesses they have to mandate a vaccine, I don’t believe the government should tell a company they can’t. Businesses should have the freedom to make decisions based on their circumstances. When the government starts to pick winners and losers, we are headed down a slippery slope.”

While the debate over how far bans on vaccine mandates will rage on, one thing is being made perfectly clear by Republicans: They will fight back against the Biden administration’s overreach.

The argument that this is not truly a vaccine mandate because companies also have the option to conduct weekly tests does not hold much weight.

It’s a major hassle to require weekly testing, especially at large companies, so many will likely take the easy way out and lay off employees that reject the shot.

As Stitt mentioned, this is not about the effectiveness of the vaccine or whether somebody “should” get the shot. It’s about the principle.

It is possible for someone to be vaccinated and also understand that it is a personal health decision, but the divisive nature of left-wing politicians has encouraged a caste system based on vaccination status.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

The Biden administration’s vaccine mandate for companies with over 100 employees through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is expected to be put in place soon, and Republican governors around the country are prepared to take legal action against the measure. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis made it clear that his state will be suing the administration for the invasive policy. “I think that the mandate is going to lose in court,” he said at a news conference Thursday. According to Fox News, a lawsuit from the state would be filed through the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. “No one should lose their job over these shots. I think we want to protect people’s jobs,” DeSantis said. “These are folks that have been working throughout this whole time, they were put in situations where they were exposing themselves to risk knowingly to help others, and we did that, and we considered them heroes just a year ago. “Now, you’re gonna let them go by the wayside?” Floridians should not lose their jobs due to heavy-handed mandates. pic.twitter.com/zhgYZYsrIL — Ron DeSantis (@GovRonDeSantis) October 15, 2021 In Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott took preventive action by signing an executive order banning a requirement for vaccines by any person or group in the public or private sector. “No entity in Texas can compel receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine by any individual, including an employee or a consumer, who objects to such vaccination for any reason of personal conscience, based on a religious belief, or for medical reasons, including prior recovery from COVID-19,” the order states, directly bucking both President Joe Biden and companies that want to mandate the coronavirus vaccine. A criticism of Abbott’s order is that is interferes with the freedom of private businesses to determine health guidelines for their employees, which explains…

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