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Canadian Cyberattack Investigated for Potential Russian Connection

And so it begins.

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To describe the way in which Russian President Vladimir Putin operates is difficult to do unless you’re willing to use some colorful, albeit crass language.  In fact, perhaps the most succinct way to put it is that he’s sleazy, particularly once he’s set a plan in motion…such as his undeniable desire to invade Ukraine.

For instance, Putin is building up a massive force of Russia troops and resources near the border of Ukraine as we speak, with tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousand of troops involved.  This has, unsurprisingly, drawn the attention of the entire world, who’ve all made it very clear, in unison, that any attempt to invade Ukraine will be met with retaliation.

But Putin surely expected that, and he has declared that the rest of the world is not well-enough abreast of the situation to make any judgement on his actions, while also threatening nuclear war against those who try to stop him.

Worse still are the fears that Russia could employ one of its favorite anti-western tactics in this tempter tantrum as well:  Cyberattacks.

America’s friendly neighbors to the north are wondering if this sort of rebuke hasn’t already begun.

An attack on the computer systems of Canada’s Global Affairs Department last week has kept at least some diplomats without access to some online functions, the government’s Treasury Board said.

The board said Tuesday that “access to a very limited number of internet-based services remain restricted as part of the mitigation measures.” It didn’t say who was behind the Jan. 19 attack or give details of what occurred.

The timing was suspect, to say the least.

The incident came a day before the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security urged companies to bolster protections against the potential for Russian-backed attacks amid escalating tensions over a potential Russian invasion of Ukraine.

“The Government of Canada deals with ongoing and persistent cyber risks and threats every day,” the board said. “Cyberthreats can result from system or application vulnerabilities, or from deliberate, persistent, targeted attacks by outside actors to gain access to information.”

Moscow is currently in a military standoff with NATO — including Canada — over Russia’s military buildup on the border with Ukraine, which reported Jan. 16 that Russia appeared to be behind an attack on its websites — something Russia denied.

Putin is undoubtedly playing some sort of tawdry game here, as he is wont to do, and it will be up to the rest of the world to put him in his place in the coming days.

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Secret Service Shamed After Drunk Agents Assault Cab Driver in South Korea

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations.

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You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it.

For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression.

This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets.

Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident.

The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News.

Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver.

There could be more trouble coming, as well.

In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed.

One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed.

The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives.

“The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.”

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it. For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression. This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets. Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident. The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News. Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver. There could be more trouble coming, as well. In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed. One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed. The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives. “The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.” There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

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See No Evil Flags

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

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A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

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