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Canceled: ‘Censoring the Pilgrims’ Left Demands WSJ Stop Publishing Thanksgiving Editorials

Western Journal

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How long before Thanksgiving becomes another holiday celebrating American self-flagellation?

To a certain extent, it’s already there. Talk much about the Pilgrims in mixed political company, and it won’t be long until the left-leaning members present start talking about genocide. If Columbus Day is the Washington Redskins of holidays, Thanksgiving is like the Atlanta Braves: not quite as objectionable to those who believe we only started being moral creatures about five years ago, but you get the feeling it’s only a matter of time before they’re the Atlanta Baseball Team.

And even if you can’t get the holiday changed, you can certainly gain a certain amount of notoriety for being a staunch revisionist. Take Randy Kritkausky, an author who focuses on Native Americans. Quite a few more people know his name this Thanksgiving, thanks to his petition to end a tradition at The Wall Street Journal: publishing two editorials by its former editor on the holiday.

“The progressives have come for our annual Thanksgiving editorials,” the Journal’s editorial board wrote in a Monday piece titled “Censoring the Pilgrims.”

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“They won’t succeed, but we thought we’d share the tale with readers for an insight into the politicization of everything, even Thanksgiving.”

“Since 1961, we’ve run a pair of editorials written by our former editor Vermont Royster. The first is a historical account about the Pilgrims in 1620 as related by William Bradford, a governor of Plymouth Colony. The second is a contemporary contrast from the mid-20th century about the progress a prosperous America has made that we can all be thankful for,” the piece continued.

“The editorials are popular with readers, who tell us they appreciate the sentiments about hardship and gratitude during what should be a unifying national holiday. For decades we’ve run them with nary a discouraging word.”

Enter Kritkausky, whose petition on Change.org has garnered over 50,000 signatures as of Wednesday morning.

Should The Wall Street Journal continue running its Thanksgiving editorials?

He wrote that the first editorial, the one which gives a historical account of the Pilgrims’ first winter in America, “is full of disdain and racism towards indigenous people, and it’s time to stop publishing it.”

“Tell the Wall Street Journal that it’s 2021. It’s time to stop publishing 17th century racism,” he wrote.

“The passage includes lines such as, ‘What could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wilde beasts and wilde men?’ The pilgrim writes that they were separate from ‘all the civil parts of the world.’

“The Wampanoag indigenous people saved the colonists from starvation and death, a story that our nation now celebrates as Thanksgiving,” Kritkausky continued.

“But even more than this disturbing lack of gratitude is the notion that there were no civilized people in the Americas. This world view generated centuries of genocidal practices that eliminated 90% of the indigenous population, my ancestors.”

And so it continued. Kritkausky mentioned the discovery of over 1,300 unmarked graves of indigenous children at Canada’s so-called residential schools and how, given the events of late, the editorials “should not be acceptable in a newspaper claiming to be an international media source.”

“I have previously written to The Wall Street Journal requesting an end to this annual practice. My request has been ignored,” Kritkausky wrote.

“Now I ask you to stand with me calling for The Wall Street Journal to end this racist insult. Such an action would be an appropriate commemoration of the 400th anniversary of Thanksgiving in the United States.”

The good news for Kritkausky, I suppose, is that he finally has a response. The bad news is that he’s essentially being made an object lesson for what happens when an institution stands up against the digital mob.

The editorial board wrote Kritkausky’s petition was “a willful misreading of the editorial, which recounts the bravery and trials of the Pilgrims as they sought a better life in a new land.

“The petition makes a historical point, which is fair enough, but then wraps it in the grievances of contemporary politics to claim the editorial is racist. Somehow the Pilgrims and their chronicler share responsibility for genocide. The point of the statement and petition isn’t to promote debate but to shut it down.”

“We don’t mind giving critics a chance to make their case, but we won’t bend to political demands for censorship. We will run the editorials as usual this week.”

Even if it’s not Thanksgiving, you can read them here (the evil one about the Pilgrims that Kritkausky believes is a “racist insult”) and here (the less-offensive one about living in a thriving, prosperous America).

It’s worth noting that, to close the second editorial, Royster said Americans “can remind ourselves that for all our social discord we yet remain the longest enduring society of free men governing themselves without benefit of kings or dictators. Being so, we are the marvel and the mystery of the world, for that enduring liberty is no less a blessing than the abundance of the earth.

“And we might remind ourselves also, that if those men setting out from Delftshaven [the Pilgrims] had been daunted by the troubles they saw around them, then we could not this autumn be thankful for a fair land.”

These are arguably stormier days than when Royster first wrote the editorial in 1961, with more than a few troubles for us to be daunted by. Many of these troubles stem from those who believe we’re not a “society of free men governing themselves without benefit of kings or dictators” and never have been. Others would rather those who share their values were our cultural “kings or dictators” and did away with the many of the enduring liberties we enjoy.

We can be thankful the Pilgrims didn’t fold to the troubles which faced them. We can also be thankful the Journal, when faced with an entirely different hindrance, didn’t flinch, either.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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Epstein Pilot Drops Names of Who Flew on Jet, Including 2 Presidents and a Prince – But That’s Not All

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It was high living, Jeffrey Epstein-style.

Jurors in the sex-trafficking trial of Ghislaine Maxwell, sometime paramour and longtime associate of the deceased financier and convicted sex offender, got a glimpse this week of some of the circles Epstein traveled in before his death in a federal prison cell more than two years ago.

And as a former pilot on Epstein’s private jet testified, his acquaintances included some of the most famous men in the world.

It wasn’t just former President Bill Clinton who logged significant flying time on the plane known as “The Lolita Express.”

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How much time Clinton actually spent is a matter of dispute. He admits to being on four flights; flight records show at least 26.

Raise your hand if you automatically believe Bill Clinton about anything. (Your left hand.)

It wasn’t just former President Donald Trump, who banned Epstein from his estate in Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach County, Florida, and is known to have flown on the Epstein jet just once.

It wasn’t even just Prince Andrew of the British royal family whom pilot Lawrence Paul Visoski Jr. remembered flying around the world.

During his testimony Tuesday, according to the New York Post, Visoski also dropped the names of several well-known figures.

John Glenn, the first American to orbit the earth in space who later became a Democratic United States senator from Ohio, was mentioned, along with former Sen. George Mitchell, the Democrat from Maine best known for helping lead the 9/11 Commission into the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington in 2001 and forging a lasting, if occasionally tenuous, peace in Northern Ireland.

There were also big names from the world of entertainment like internationally known violinist Itzhak Perlman and — perhaps not so surprisingly — actor Kevin Spacey, a man with a reputation nearly as bad as Bill Clinton’s.

Having big names on board is probably par for the course when you’re a pilot for a man as wealthy as Epstein was before his death (if he wasn’t a billionaire, he was worth hundreds of millions, according to a Fortune article from 2019.)

But there’s no doubt the big names Epstein associated with are regretting their acquaintance with the man who pleaded guilty in 2008 to procuring a minor for prostitution as a way to settle accusations of multiple sex crimes.

While Maxwell’s trial — and Visoski’s testimony — provides liberals with a finger-pointing opportunity to claim Trump had an involvement with Epstein, the situation for Bill Clinton is worse.

His relationship with Epstein was closer (Epstein favored Democrats), he flew on Epstein’s plane much more often and, realistically speaking, his reputation for sexual misbehavior is not only worldwide, it’s a matter of historical record.

(In fact, it was just featured in the FX drama “Impeachment: An American Crime Story”).

It would be hard to find an honest American who would claim true surprise to hear of anything the 42nd president might have done when it comes to the fairer sex.

But for all of Epstein’s associates — very much including Prince Andrew — the trial of Ghislaine Maxwell on charges of procuring underage girls to satisfy the late financier’s unnatural sexual urges has to be opening up some very unwelcome cans of worms.

As Epstein showed before his “suicide” more than two years ago, the higher anyone flies, the farther, and harder, the fall.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

It was high living, Jeffrey Epstein-style. Jurors in the sex-trafficking trial of Ghislaine Maxwell, sometime paramour and longtime associate of the deceased financier and convicted sex offender, got a glimpse this week of some of the circles Epstein traveled in before his death in a federal prison cell more than two years ago. And as a former pilot on Epstein’s private jet testified, his acquaintances included some of the most famous men in the world. It wasn’t just former President Bill Clinton who logged significant flying time on the plane known as “The Lolita Express.” How much time Clinton actually spent is a matter of dispute. He admits to being on four flights; flight records show at least 26. Raise your hand if you automatically believe Bill Clinton about anything. (Your left hand.) Epstein’s pilot just said that Clinton flew on the plane many times. We know of 26 locations Clinton flew with Epstein. This is getting dangerous.https://t.co/XlIXoe8bir — Maxwell Trial Tracker (@TrackerTrial) November 30, 2021 It wasn’t just former President Donald Trump, who banned Epstein from his estate in Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach County, Florida, and is known to have flown on the Epstein jet just once. It wasn’t even just Prince Andrew of the British royal family whom pilot Lawrence Paul Visoski Jr. remembered flying around the world. During his testimony Tuesday, according to the New York Post, Visoski also dropped the names of several well-known figures. John Glenn, the first American to orbit the earth in space who later became a Democratic United States senator from Ohio, was mentioned, along with former Sen. George Mitchell, the Democrat from Maine best known for helping lead the 9/11 Commission into the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington in 2001 and forging a lasting, if occasionally tenuous, peace in…

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Photo: Here’s the Creepy Ghislaine Maxwell Moment Court Illustrator Caught – It Will Haunt You

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Jane Rosenberg, a court artist currently covering the trial of Ghislaine Maxwell, captured a rather haunting image during a pre-trial hearing in New York City.

Maxwell currently faces several charges related to her alleged participation in the many sex crimes committed by notorious financier Jeffrey Epstein, who is now deceased.

According to Reuters, as court artists drew their sketches of Maxwell, she stared right back at them and, in turn, made sketches of the artists.

Rosenberg depicted this in one of her illustrations of the proceedings.

“Ghislaine Maxwell, the Jeffrey Epstein associate accused of sex trafficking, makes a sketch of court artists while seated between defense attorneys Bobbi Sternheim and Jeffrey Pagliuca, during a pre-trial hearing ahead of jury selection, in a courtroom sketch in New York City, U.S.,” Reuters wrote in its description of the illustration.

Apparently, this was not a first for Rosenberg.

The accomplished courtroom artist told The Western Journal that, during the trial of Lev Parnas — a Ukrainian-American businessman who was convicted on charges related to violating campaign finance laws — one of the co-defendants drew a sketch of her.

“Maybe I got more interesting looking since [the] pandemic?” Rosenberg told The Western Journal in an email.

As it turns out, Rosenberg had actually drawn sketches of Epstein as well during a few pre-trial hearings.

“There wasn’t a trial,” she told the New York Post. “So it was just a few hearings before he killed himself, or didn’t kill himself.”

Rosenberg noted that she’s very careful to make sure her drawings are not too judgemental.

“I have to hear the facts before I make a judgment on how I would vote,” she said.

Despite this, she told the Post what she thought of Epstein.

“He’s totally a sicko, weirdo,” she said.

Many of the crimes committed by Epstein — of which Maxwell is alleged to be a conspirator — appear rather sick by any standard.

On Wednesday, the first of Maxwell’s accusers — identified as “Jane” — gave graphic testimony related to the abuse she had allegedly suffered at the hands of both Epstein and Maxwell.

According to Jane, Maxwell not only groomed her for sexual abuse but also participated in the abuse herself.

“I was abused pretty much every time that I would go over to his house, and it all started to seem the same after a while — whether it was just him or there were other women involved, or me and Jeffrey and Ghislaine, it all started to seem the same,” Jane testified.

“After a while, you just become numb to it.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Jane Rosenberg, a court artist currently covering the trial of Ghislaine Maxwell, captured a rather haunting image during a pre-trial hearing in New York City. Maxwell currently faces several charges related to her alleged participation in the many sex crimes committed by notorious financier Jeffrey Epstein, who is now deceased. According to Reuters, as court artists drew their sketches of Maxwell, she stared right back at them and, in turn, made sketches of the artists. Rosenberg depicted this in one of her illustrations of the proceedings. I asked the courtroom artist — Jane Rosenberg — how it felt to have Maxwell draw her & if this had ever happened before “Oddly it happened in the last trial I sketched [Lev Parnas]. His co defendant was sketching me. Maybe I got more interesting looking since [the] pandemic?” pic.twitter.com/2u9wKxtJPa — Michael Austin (@mikeswriting) December 2, 2021 “Ghislaine Maxwell, the Jeffrey Epstein associate accused of sex trafficking, makes a sketch of court artists while seated between defense attorneys Bobbi Sternheim and Jeffrey Pagliuca, during a pre-trial hearing ahead of jury selection, in a courtroom sketch in New York City, U.S.,” Reuters wrote in its description of the illustration. Apparently, this was not a first for Rosenberg. The accomplished courtroom artist told The Western Journal that, during the trial of Lev Parnas — a Ukrainian-American businessman who was convicted on charges related to violating campaign finance laws — one of the co-defendants drew a sketch of her. “Maybe I got more interesting looking since [the] pandemic?” Rosenberg told The Western Journal in an email. As it turns out, Rosenberg had actually drawn sketches of Epstein as well during a few pre-trial hearings. “There wasn’t a trial,” she told the New York Post. “So it was just a few hearings before he killed himself, or…

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