Connect with us

News

CNN Contributor Suggests Making it ‘Hard’ to be Unvaccinated

So much for bodily sovereignty.

Published

on

vaccines

We are fast approaching the point of the pandemic in which everyone who wanted to be vaccinated against COVID-19 has achieved that goal.  For the government, this should be the point where they  pat themselves on the back for making those shots available as quickly as they did, and they move on.  After all, we have bodily sovereignty here in the United States, and the feds shouldn’t be sticking their nose too far into our business on that front.

But no.  Instead of respecting the decisions that so many Americans have made, it appears as though governmental forces and corporate entities are pushing the idea of treating unvaccinated Americans like second-class citizens, segregating them within crowds and requiring them to maintain stricter safety standards than the rest of us.

Now, one CNN contributor has said the quiet part out loud, stating that life should be “hard” for those who choose to remain unvaccinated.

Trending: Civilian Alerts Airmen After Noticing Something Odd Coming from Back of F-15 Jet, Now They're Thanking Him

CNN medical contributor Dr. Leana Wen suggested Saturday that life needs to be “hard” for Americans who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine and individuals who refuse to get shots should perhaps face weekly testings.

take our poll - story continues below

Do you think Cubans are fighting for healthcare or freedom from Communism?

  • Do you think Cubans are fighting for healthcare or freedom from Communism?

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

“It needs to be hard for people to remain unvaccinated,” Wen, the former Planned Parenthood president, said. “Right now, it’s kind of the opposite.”

Unvaccinated people, she fretted, can at the moment go about their lives as normal without any consequence.

“But at some point these mandates, by workplaces, by schools, I think it will be important to say, ‘Hey, you can opt out, but if you want to opt out, you have to sign these forms, you have to get twice weekly testing,’” Wen said. “Basically, we need to make getting vaccinated the easy choice.”

The sentiment isn’t likely to go over well with the roughly 30% of Americans who’ve decided against receiving a COVID-19 inoculation.

News

International Athletic Authorities Set to Review Marijuana Use Policies

The marijuana revolution is going global.

Published

on

Things are changing rapidly within society here in the 21st century, as our governing bodies finally begin to take a look at some long-held, but naive beliefs about certain medical plants. In the United States, for instance, the marijuana revolution is happening right before our eyes, as more than half the states in the nation now allow citizens to indulge in some form of legal, medicinal, or decriminalized use of the plant.  About a third of the states even allow for recreational use, and those locales have been enjoying both incredible tax revenues from the highly-regulated sale of legal weed, as well as the societal benefits that come along with – including a sharp decrease in the use of more dangerous drugs. Now it appears as though this sentiment is going global. Sebastian Coe wants to ensure what happened this month to American sprinter Sha’Carri Richardson won’t knock another athlete out of the Olympics in the future. Richardson, who won the 100 meters at the U.S. trials last month, didn’t travel to Japan for the Tokyo Games after being caught smoking marijuana. Coe, the president of international track body World Athletics, said Tuesday the absence of the 21-year-old Richardson is “a loss to the competition” and added he supports a review of marijuana’s status as a doping substance in light of her case. And he wasn’t mincing his words. “It should be. It’s sensible,” Coe said when asked if a rethink was needed about marijuana being on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s prohibited list. “Nothing is set in tablets of stone,” said Coe, who has asked track’s independent Athletics Integrity Unit to work with WADA. “You adapt and occasionally reassess.” Congressional leaders on both sides of the aisle have expressed optimism that a new bill meant to decriminalize marijuana at the…

Continue Reading

News

CDC Set to Make Major Change to Mask Policy as Delta Variant Spreads

One step forward, two steps back…

Published

on

We were so close, weren’t we?  It has very much felt like the American people were on the precipice of pandemic peace in recent weeks, as restaurants and movie theaters and concert venues all began to open back up in earnest. But then the “delta” variant began to spread, having mutated out of the unvaccinated populations of the world, spreading faster and more vociferously than the strain we’d been battling for well over a year.  Now, thanks to a major uptick in transmission rates, the CDC is about to take a large step backward. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to recommend Tuesday that fully vaccinated people begin wearing masks indoors again in places with high Covid-19 transmission rates, according to people familiar with the matter. Federal health officials still believe fully vaccinated individuals represent a very small amount of transmission, according to the sources. Still, some vaccinated people could be carrying higher levels of the virus than previously understood and potentially transmit it to others, they said. The CDC is slated to hold a briefing at 3 p.m. ET on Tuesday. The weather had something to do with it, as well. The updated guidance comes ahead of the fall season, when the highly contagious delta variant is expected to cause another surge in new coronavirus cases and many large employers plan to bring workers back to the office. In mid-May, the CDC said fully vaccinated people didn’t need to wear masks in most settings, whether indoors or outdoors. The move is certainly not going to be a popular one in the United States, where the vaccination rate has essentially peaked, with nearly half the country having opted to forego the inoculation.

Continue Reading

Latest Articles

Best of the Week