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Congress Agrees to $900 Billion COVID Package, $600 Checks Going to Most Americans

Done deal.

John Salvatore

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They said it would get done, they just never gave an exact date. We now know that Pelosi and her goons in the House held up a COVID relief bill until it was apparent that Joe Biden had stolen the election.

Late on Sunday evening, though, a deal was finally reached.

Here’s what’s up, via Fox News:

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday evening said lawmakers have reached a long-awaited coronavirus relief bill, though it will be hours before the full details are made public, Fox News has learned.

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[…]

According to congressional leaders, the agreement would establish temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefits and $600 direct stimulus payments to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction.

Mitch McConnell noted, “For months, literally months, Senate Republicans have been calling for another targeted package to reopen the job-saving Paycheck Protection Program, extend federal unemployment benefits, fund K-12 schools, fund vaccine distribution and get a lot more help onto the front lines as fast as possible. I’m relieved that we appear to be hours away from legislation that will finally do that.

LOOK:

VIDEO:

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Content Warning: VA Schoolbook So Vile, It Legally Must Be Blurred When Shown on TV

Western Journal

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When we were kids, our parents had to watch out to make sure we weren’t exposed to filth on television. Now, apparently, television has to ensure our parents aren’t exposed to the filth their kids are seeing in school.

That’s at least the situation in Virginia — ground zero for educational unpleasantness at the moment, where progressive educators are aghast that parents apparently think they have some say in what their kids are exposed to at school, no matter how objectionable or dissipated it might be.

The educators have an ally in Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate this year and a former governor of the Old Dominion. During his time as governor, McAuliffe vetoed a bill that would have allowed parents to remove sexually explicit books from Virginia schools.

During the final gubernatorial debate last month with Republican Glenn Youngkin, McAuliffe vigorously defended his policies on education.

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“I’m not gonna let parents come into schools and actually take books out and make their own decisions,” McAuliffe told Youngkin. “I stopped the bill that I don’t think parents should be telling schools what they should teach.”

Most of the coverage regarding McAuliffe’s remark during the debate centered on the battles surrounding curricula that include elements of critical race theory, a controversial far-left school of thought that argues both the United States and Western civilization were founded on systemic racism.

That’s a rabbit hole for another day, but there’s a creepier side to McAuliffe’s remark, given another front in Virginia’s education battles: Pornographic materials that are either part of the curriculum or available to children.

Take the book “Gender Queer” by Maia Kobabe. As a recent ad from conservative group Independent Women’s Voice noted, the material in the book is so graphic that “TV rules say adults can’t see this, but VA schools think it’s fine for kids.”

The scene from the graphic novel shows a character, who is apparently a girl who identifies as a boy,  in a library exchanging sexual texts with someone. The text had to be redacted and the images blurred because even TV — home to “The Jerry Springer Show,” “Jersey Shore,” “The Real Housewives of [Insert City Here]” and “My Mother the Car” — still has some standards.  An unexpurgated version of the ad is available IWV website — and, if you must know, the conversation revolves around a sex toy and several sex acts.

“This is the most turned on I’ve been in my life. I am DYING,” the girl says.

On the next page, one of the aforementioned sex acts is demonstrated — and needed to be blurred out, natch. Apparently, the girl doesn’t like it, saying that it “was MUCH HOTTER when it was only in my imagination.”

“Let’s try something else,” she says, to which her lover says, “Of course.”

This is all deliberately vague because, well, you’re not reading Teen Vogue. The ad — including the uncensored version — can be seen here. Be forewarned: You’ll likely wish this all remained vague.

However, it’s important because, when he was governor, McAuliffe vetoed a 2016 bill that would have allowed parents to block their children from accessing or being taught sexually explicit material.

“McAuliffe (D) said a state law is ‘unnecessary’ because the Virginia Board of Education is considering changing state policy to accommodate parents’ concerns,” The Washington Post reported at the time.

“School boards are best positioned to ensure that our students are exposed to those appropriate literary and artistic works that will expand students’ horizons and enrich their learning experiences,” McAuliffe said at the time.

This includes “Gender Queer,” which was one of two books a Virginia mom was able to check out of her kids’ high school in Fairfax, Virginia. She went viral after she confronted the school board about the availability of the material.

“Both of these books include pedophilia,” Stacy Langton told the board, according to a Fox News from Sept. 24. “Sex between men and boys … One book describes a fourth-grade boy performing oral sex on an adult male. The other book has detailed illustrations of a man having sex with a boy.”

When she began reading from the books, one of the school board members interrupted her with this immortal line: “There are children in the audience here.” I’d recommend laughing at the irony as opposed to crying over the rank depravity, if only because the latter is unbecoming.

WARNING: The following video contains graphic language that some viewers will find offensive.

So apparently, that “changing state policy to accommodate parents’ concerns” part turned out swimmingly in the intervening five years.

And now, the Democrats are looking to elect a man who says, “I’m not gonna let parents come into schools and actually take books out and make their own decisions.” This, presumably, includes “Gender Queer.”

This is why it would behoove parents to elect candidates who allow them to make the decision to take porn out of their child’s library.

According to the FCC, “Federal law prohibits obscene, indecent and profane content from being broadcast on the radio or TV.” The FCC acknowledges that what constitutes “obscene,” “indecent” or “profane” is subjective, but even in 2021, there are few sane adults who would argue that the scene depicted in the Kobabe work doesn’t fill the bill — and then some.

If they can’t show it on TV, schools shouldn’t be showing it to kids, either.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

When we were kids, our parents had to watch out to make sure we weren’t exposed to filth on television. Now, apparently, television has to ensure our parents aren’t exposed to the filth their kids are seeing in school. That’s at least the situation in Virginia — ground zero for educational unpleasantness at the moment, where progressive educators are aghast that parents apparently think they have some say in what their kids are exposed to at school, no matter how objectionable or dissipated it might be. The educators have an ally in Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate this year and a former governor of the Old Dominion. During his time as governor, McAuliffe vetoed a bill that would have allowed parents to remove sexually explicit books from Virginia schools. During the final gubernatorial debate last month with Republican Glenn Youngkin, McAuliffe vigorously defended his policies on education. “I’m not gonna let parents come into schools and actually take books out and make their own decisions,” McAuliffe told Youngkin. “I stopped the bill that I don’t think parents should be telling schools what they should teach.” Terry McAuliffe: “I don’t think parents should be telling schools what they should teach.” pic.twitter.com/rs6pSWZw79 — Corey A. DeAngelis (@DeAngelisCorey) October 19, 2021 Most of the coverage regarding McAuliffe’s remark during the debate centered on the battles surrounding curricula that include elements of critical race theory, a controversial far-left school of thought that argues both the United States and Western civilization were founded on systemic racism. That’s a rabbit hole for another day, but there’s a creepier side to McAuliffe’s remark, given another front in Virginia’s education battles: Pornographic materials that are either part of the curriculum or available to children. Take the book “Gender Queer” by Maia Kobabe. As a recent ad from…

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Procter & Gamble Exec Announces Prices of Household Staples Will Raise ‘Week After Week’

Western Journal

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Allison, a mother from Chicago, told the New York Post that as she sees her grocery bill keep rising, her family is starting to feel the pinch.

“There are no more splurges like going to Home Depot to buy an extra plant or eating out,” Allison said.

Many Americans are in the same position as Allison. Inflation is growing worse across the U.S., and now producers are warning their consumers that this is a problem that will not be going away soon.

Procter & Gamble, for example, announced that many of its prices will rise in the coming weeks since the cost of raw materials remains high, according to the Post. The company owns huge brands like Tide, Gillette and Crest.

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“We do not anticipate any easing of costs,” P&G chief financial officer Andre Schulten said. “We continue to see increases week after week, though at a slower pace.”

The Post cited an interview Schulten gave to The Wall Street Journal, though the WSJ appears to have removed that specific quote.

And this is not P&G’s first announcement of a price hike. Back in April, the company warned that many paper products would begin costing more, including essentials such as tampons, diapers and paper towels.

And other corporate giants such as Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and General Mills have warned buyers throughout the year that costs will keep going up, according to CNBC.

These costs keep climbing in the aftermath of the economic disruption of COVID-19, and now everyone is suffering from inflation.

The Wall Street Journal reported that U.S. inflation has reached the highest level seen in a decade.

This comes from the jump in the cost of the most basic materials that every producer needs. Lumber costs skyrocketed this spring, and wheat, copper, oil, corn, wood-pulp and other such essential raw materials have seen big surges in prices after last year’s COVID-19 economic crashes.

And with the price of materials rising, it’s only natural that corporate prices are going to follow suit. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported that P&G is expecting to spend $2.1 billion more on transportation and raw materials. And though P&G’s shares have risen 2 percent, other giants like Unilever, Colgate-Palmolive and Kimberly-Clark have watched their shares fall 7 percent or more.

Many are labeling this era “Bidenflation.” And Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has warned that she expects it to last a while.

“Supply bottlenecks have developed that have caused inflation. I believe that they’re transitory, but that doesn’t mean they’ll go away over the next several months,” Yellen said in a recent CNBC interview.

This current inflation is unsurprising after such a massive economic shutdown during COVID-19. But it’s a sharp contrast to the economic health and low inflation rates of previous years.

In 2018 and 2019, inflation rates were 2.4 percent and 1.8 percent. Last month, however, the Federal Reserve had to raise its estimated inflation rate for the year from 3.4 percent to 4.2 percent, according to MarketWatch.

Though inflation is obviously hitting corporate America hard, it is also damaging the entire distribution chain of the United States, meaning that every single person going into the grocery store is going to run into problems finding and affording what they need.

Moody’s Analytics reported that the current inflation means that families are having to spend an extra $175 a month on the basic necessities of housing, food and fuel.

These are the unfortunate costs that Americans now have to pay in the aftermath of COVID-19 and such upheaval of the economic structure and broader culture. After massive unemployment and a deep dive in the prices of raw materials during COVID-19 shutdowns last year, as things recover, prices are surging.

Like Allison’s family, many will begin to feel they can no longer afford splurges. And there are no signs of this ending soon.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Allison, a mother from Chicago, told the New York Post that as she sees her grocery bill keep rising, her family is starting to feel the pinch. “There are no more splurges like going to Home Depot to buy an extra plant or eating out,” Allison said. Many Americans are in the same position as Allison. Inflation is growing worse across the U.S., and now producers are warning their consumers that this is a problem that will not be going away soon. Procter & Gamble, for example, announced that many of its prices will rise in the coming weeks since the cost of raw materials remains high, according to the Post. The company owns huge brands like Tide, Gillette and Crest. “We do not anticipate any easing of costs,” P&G chief financial officer Andre Schulten said. “We continue to see increases week after week, though at a slower pace.” The Post cited an interview Schulten gave to The Wall Street Journal, though the WSJ appears to have removed that specific quote. And this is not P&G’s first announcement of a price hike. Back in April, the company warned that many paper products would begin costing more, including essentials such as tampons, diapers and paper towels. And other corporate giants such as Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and General Mills have warned buyers throughout the year that costs will keep going up, according to CNBC. These costs keep climbing in the aftermath of the economic disruption of COVID-19, and now everyone is suffering from inflation. The Wall Street Journal reported that U.S. inflation has reached the highest level seen in a decade. This comes from the jump in the cost of the most basic materials that every producer needs. Lumber costs skyrocketed this spring, and wheat, copper, oil, corn, wood-pulp and other such essential…

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