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Covering for Kaepernick: Couric Edited Anti-Kneeling Comments Due to RBG’s Racial Justice ‘Blind Spot’

Western Journal

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Employment apparently isn’t a very appealing prospect to former “CBS Evening News” anchor Katie Couric.

After bouncing around the nether regions of the media landscape since she left CBS in 2011 — her last major gig was with Yahoo’s streaming division, which is the mainstream media’s version of the direct-to-video movie — Couric has decided to write a tell-all called “Going There.” It manages to earn the title.

In the book, Couric admits to sabotaging the careers of other female journalists and anchors because she felt threatened.

She said Martha Stewart needed “some healthy humbling (prison will do that … ) to develop a sense of humor.”

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She jokingly implied Diane Sawyer, former host of ABC’s “Good Morning America,” would trade sexual favors for interviews. (But don’t worry, Couric didn’t really mean it: “I’m pretty sure I speak for Diane when I say neither of us ever resorted to actual fellatio to land an interview,” she wrote, “but we both engaged in the metaphoric kind — flattering gatekeepers, family members, and whoever else stood in the way of a big get.” Who said ethics in journalism was dead?)

In short, “Going There” has taken Couric from unemployed to very unemployable, and the book hasn’t even come out yet.

As if to put a finer point on the matter, the latest leaked anecdote from the forthcoming tome regarding an interview with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg manages the impressive feat of infuriating both the right and the left simultaneously.

According to a Monday piece from the Daily Mail, Couric said she selectively edited her 2016 sit-down interview with Ginsburg to omit the liberal icon’s scathing remarks directed at athletes who knelt during the national anthem, ostensibly in the name of “protecting” her.

The interview was done for Yahoo News in October 2016. At that point, two careers were in the process of terminal decline.

One was Couric’s, as she had gone from CBS News to ABC News to the news division of the MySpace of search engines.

The other was that of then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who’d placed himself in the midst of a media maelstrom by choosing to kneel during “The Star-Spangled Banner” in protest of American-centric injustice; it didn’t help that the controversy this created occurred concurrently with a precipitous decline in the quality of Kaepernick’s play.

However, other athletes joined Kaepernick and anthem-kneeling became A Thing™ in the fall of 2016, albeit as a phenomenon far more controversial than it is five years later. It was against this backdrop that Couric asked RBG what she thought of the athletes kneeling for the anthem.

The interview as published made it clear that Ginsburg wasn’t a fan. “I think it’s really dumb of them,” she said.

“Would I arrest them for doing it? No,” the justice continued. “I think it’s dumb and disrespectful. I would have the same answer if you asked me about flag burning. I think it’s a terrible thing to do, but I wouldn’t lock a person up for doing it. I would point out how ridiculous it seems to me to do such an act.”

Couric went further, asking: “But when it comes to these football players, you may find their actions offensive, but what you’re saying is, it’s within their rights to exercise those actions?”

“Yes,” she said. “If they want to be stupid, there’s no law that should be preventive. If they want to be arrogant, there’s no law that prevents them from that. What I would do is strongly take issue with the point of view that they are expressing when they do that.”

However, according to the Daily Mail, Couric revealed in “Going There” that Ginsburg — the most far-left justice to have ever sat on the high court bench by almost any metric — went even further, saying athletes like Kaepernick were showing “contempt for a government that has made it possible for their parents and grandparents to live a decent life.”

“Which they probably could not have lived in the places they came from … as they became older they realize that this was youthful folly. And that’s why education is important,” Ginsburg said.

Do you agree with Ginsburg's comments on anthem protests?

Couric said that while she tried to keep her “personal politics” out of her journalism (do try to stifle your laughter as you read that), she was a “big RBG fan” and felt the remarks were “unworthy of a crusader for equality” like Ginsburg.

She decided to leave the remarks out, obviously. Couric’s reasoning? Ginsburg was “elderly and probably didn’t fully understand the question” and racial justice was a “blind spot” for her. The justice was 83 at the time and died four years later.

Much like every other anecdote we’ve heard Couric share in her upcoming memoir, this makes the former “CBS Nightly News” anchor look nowhere near as good as one imagines she thinks it does.

First, yes — in 2021, the suggestion that athletes kneeling for the national anthem to protest vague notions of injustice is disrespectful to the country, to those who have sacrificed for it and to the fans whose expenditures pay their salaries is widely considered heretical and reactionary. In 2016, however, that was not the case.

In fact, as late as 2018, 54 percent of respondents to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll said kneeling for “The Star-Spangled Banner” was “not appropriate.”

Couric’s memory, one might say, is as selective as her editing; it’s not too much of a leap to assume she wasn’t “protecting” Ginsburg so much as she was protecting her own opinion. If one of the country’s leftist heroines was willing to go as far as to say anthem protests show “contempt for a government that has made it possible for their parents and grandparents to live a decent life,” maybe it wasn’t Ginsburg who had the “blind spot.”

It’s also worth noting that nowhere in the Yahoo interview (or other contemporaneous sit-downs) did the justice come across as unduly “elderly” — and her response made clear the excuse Ginsburg “probably didn’t fully understand the question” is silly. For that matter, if RBG really were in such a state of decline that she couldn’t properly comprehend the question and Couric was “protecting” her, why was the interview published at all?

The likely answer is that Couric believes none of her own excuses. In this case, her “personal politics” couldn’t allow her to let conservatives have the pleasure of Ginsburg pointing out the obvious when it comes to anthem protesters. She published a narrative, not the news.

It’s worth noting this revelation will have the added bonus of further enraging progressives still unhappy with Ginsburg for not retiring in 2014 when the Democrats had the White House and the Senate.

Her death in September 2020 led to Amy Coney Barrett’s ascension to the high court. After the Supreme Court refused to block Texas’ abortion law, that led to tweets like this one from writer Nandini Balial:

Hey, speaking of “dumb and disrespectful.”

Whatever the case, Couric’s memoir is shaping up to be one of the great media miscalculations of recent years, a self-sabotaging tell-all that spills plenty of dirt — and almost all of it about Katie Couric.

She killed the careers of other female journalists because she felt threatened by them. She admits to engaging in “metaphoric” sex acts to get scoops. And now we know she selectively edited an interview when RBG made too much sense.

At this rate, by the time “Going There” is released on Oct. 26, Katie Couric might not even be able to get a gig on TikTok.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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Stranger Saves Teen Hit by Car, Then Disappears After Rescue

Western Journal

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Lily Irigoyen, 14, from Escondido, California, was headed to Westfield North County Mall with a friend to do some shopping on May 23 when Irigoyen’s life was turned upside down.

As she was crossing a street — using a crosswalk — a driver failed to stop at a stop sign and hit the teenager. She immediately blacked out.

Two other drivers saw what had happened and raced to help. Police later said that a female good Samaritan called 911 and contacted Irigoyen’s family using her cell phone, and a man performed CPR on the teen’s lifeless body — an act that would later turn out to have made all the difference.

The girl’s mother, Isabel Torres, remembers getting the call that broke her heart.



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“Her dad called me that she was in an accident and she was airlifted to the hospital,” she told KNSD.

Irigoyen had suffered a long list of serious injuries, including a damaged kidney, a broken arm, a broken leg, a broken hip and a punctured lung. Worst of all, she had also suffered a brain injury.

For three weeks, the teen was in a coma. Even after coming out of it, she had to stay at the hospital for six months, recovering. She finally made it home in August, and her mom has hope that she will recover.

“We’re getting there,” Torres told KNSD. “With time, I think she’s going to get better and better.”

Police later said that, while the driver who hit the teen was determined to be at fault, no criminal charges were made.

After a recent checkup, Irigoyen has a new goal: To find and thank the good Samaritan who saved her life.

“The doctor told her that everything that happened and she mentioned that, thanks to the person that assisted at the accident with the CPR, she always had air to her brain and for that main reason, they saved her life,” Torres explained.

“I just like felt, like happy, just the fact that someone had that kindness in their heart to help me was nice,” Irigoyen added. “I just want to say how grateful I am … that they helped me and that I’m alive now because of them.”



The man is believed to be a dental surgeon, according to KGTV, though he has not yet been identified or stepped forward.

“I think they’re angels,” a teary Torres told KGTV. “God put them there for a reason … I think it’s a great time to find them, and tell them what a great thing they did … What they did was just amazing.”

“They saved me!” said Irigoyen. “They’re the reason I’m here right now … I would just hug them. No words to express how thankful I am.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Lily Irigoyen, 14, from Escondido, California, was headed to Westfield North County Mall with a friend to do some shopping on May 23 when Irigoyen’s life was turned upside down. As she was crossing a street — using a crosswalk — a driver failed to stop at a stop sign and hit the teenager. She immediately blacked out. Two other drivers saw what had happened and raced to help. Police later said that a female good Samaritan called 911 and contacted Irigoyen’s family using her cell phone, and a man performed CPR on the teen’s lifeless body — an act that would later turn out to have made all the difference. The girl’s mother, Isabel Torres, remembers getting the call that broke her heart. “Her dad called me that she was in an accident and she was airlifted to the hospital,” she told KNSD. Irigoyen had suffered a long list of serious injuries, including a damaged kidney, a broken arm, a broken leg, a broken hip and a punctured lung. Worst of all, she had also suffered a brain injury. For three weeks, the teen was in a coma. Even after coming out of it, she had to stay at the hospital for six months, recovering. She finally made it home in August, and her mom has hope that she will recover. “We’re getting there,” Torres told KNSD. “With time, I think she’s going to get better and better.” Police later said that, while the driver who hit the teen was determined to be at fault, no criminal charges were made. After a recent checkup, Irigoyen has a new goal: To find and thank the good Samaritan who saved her life. “The doctor told her that everything that happened and she mentioned that, thanks to the person that…

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Brian Laundrie’s Parents Flee Florida Home as ‘For Sale’ Sign Appears Outside

Western Journal

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Brian Laundrie’s parents may be looking for a new place to live after weeks of scrutiny on the couple.

Their North Port, Florida, home now has a “For Sale by Owner” sign in the front yard, according to the New York Post.

The house became the site of a media circus, with outlets looking for answers in the death of Laundrie’s fiancee Gabby Petito and the whereabouts of Laundrie himself.

Petito’s remains were found at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Laundrie was found dead at the Carlton Reserve in Sarasota County, Florida in October.

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Laundrie’s lawyer announced that he had died by suicide, with a gunshot wound to the head.

As for Chris and Roberta Laundrie, rumors ran rampant that they knew the whereabouts of their son, who was the sole murder suspect in Petito’s death.

The Post reported that neighbors took advantage of the Laundrie couple having the spotlight, with some even renting their front yards to media outlets for up to $3,500 a week in order to pester the pair around the clock.

No charges have been filed against the parents, but their “lack of cooperation” at times during the investigation may have created unnecessary obstacles, according to a North Port police spokesman last month.

According to WNBC-TV, authorities mistook Roberta Laundrie for her son as she drove his Mustang home at the beginning of the manhunt, a move viewed as part of the parents’ resistance to complying fully with investigators early on.

“Other than confusion, it likely changed nothing. We just wanted people to better understand why we thought we knew Brian was in his home,” North Port Police spokesman Josh Taylor said Oct. 29, the outlet reported.

The family’s attorney, Steve Bertolino, has remained firm that his clients fully complied with the investigation, but was talking with law enforcement in November, WFLA-TV reported.

Still, there is no indication as of now that the parents will have charges against them.

If the couple decides to leave their home, they might want to consider changing their names and buying fake mustaches to protect their identity.

Based on the attitude of their current neighbors, it would not be surprising if they were met with hostility wherever they choose to move.

For now, the toughest task will be finding a new owner for the property, which has now become a symbol for one of the most highly followed crime stories of the century.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Brian Laundrie’s parents may be looking for a new place to live after weeks of scrutiny on the couple. Their North Port, Florida, home now has a “For Sale by Owner” sign in the front yard, according to the New York Post. The house became the site of a media circus, with outlets looking for answers in the death of Laundrie’s fiancee Gabby Petito and the whereabouts of Laundrie himself. Petito’s remains were found at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Laundrie was found dead at the Carlton Reserve in Sarasota County, Florida in October. Laundrie’s lawyer announced that he had died by suicide, with a gunshot wound to the head. As for Chris and Roberta Laundrie, rumors ran rampant that they knew the whereabouts of their son, who was the sole murder suspect in Petito’s death. The Post reported that neighbors took advantage of the Laundrie couple having the spotlight, with some even renting their front yards to media outlets for up to $3,500 a week in order to pester the pair around the clock. No charges have been filed against the parents, but their “lack of cooperation” at times during the investigation may have created unnecessary obstacles, according to a North Port police spokesman last month. According to WNBC-TV, authorities mistook Roberta Laundrie for her son as she drove his Mustang home at the beginning of the manhunt, a move viewed as part of the parents’ resistance to complying fully with investigators early on. “Other than confusion, it likely changed nothing. We just wanted people to better understand why we thought we knew Brian was in his home,” North Port Police spokesman Josh Taylor said Oct. 29, the outlet reported. The family’s attorney, Steve Bertolino, has remained firm that his clients fully complied with the investigation, but was…

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