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Dana Loesch Touching Story of Encounter With Military Widow…Try Not to Cry

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Dana Loesch, the thick-skinned and quick-witted radio host and NRA spokeswoman is usually in the news for sparring with gun control advocates and destroying false narratives with cold-hard facts.

Those who are more familiar with Loesch’s work, however, know that she’s a devout Christian with a big, soft heart and that there are few people for whom she has more respect than our men and women in uniform.

So when she and her husband were traveling on their 18th anniversary over the weekend and noticed an older woman who seemed to be distressed and carried a folded flag on their lap throughout the flight, she took to Instagram to share the story of their touching encounter.

“Today my husband and I are celebrating our 18th wedding anniversary. I am grateful for this man. Yesterday we celebrated a dear friend and his new wife as they began their married life,” she began.

“While on the first flight Friday to get us from Dallas to our destination we noticed that we each had aisle seats and wondered if anyone would be willing to switch with one of us so we could sit together.

“A soft-spoken older woman a grandmother’s age kindly offered. She was traveling alone with only a small black suitcase and an blue, ordinary cloth grocery bag. We thanked her and promised to help her with her luggage after we landed.

As the flight prepared for departure, they couldn’t help she seemed quite somber.

“A flight attendant asked if she needed anything, she shook her head, thanked him,” she explained,
“and reached for something in her grocery bag and removed an unmistakable triangle-folded flag.

“She placed it on her lap, her hands over it, and closed her eyes as the plane sped down the runway and ascended into the sky,” Loesch explains.

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Today my husband and I are celebrating our 18th wedding anniversary. I am grateful for this man. Yesterday we celebrated a dear friend and his new wife as they began their married life. While on the first flight Friday to get us from Dallas to our destination we noticed that we each had aisle seats and wondered if anyone would be willing to switch with one of us so we could sit together. A soft-spoken older woman a grandmother’s age kindly offered. She was traveling alone with only a small black suitcase and an blue, ordinary cloth grocery bag. We thanked her and promised to help her with her luggage after we landed. As the cabin door shut after the last passenger boarded I noticed from the corner of my eye that she seemed upset. A flight attendant asked if she needed anything, she shook her head, thanked him, and reached for something in her grocery bag and removed an unmistakable triangle-folded flag. She placed it on her lap, her hands over it, and closed her eyes as the plane sped down the runway and ascended into the sky. I nudged my husband and gestured to her. She kept that flag on her lap for the entire flight, only carefully placing it back into her humble cloth bag after we touched down in Chicago. My husband leaned up and gently touched her elbow. “I noticed the flag you’re carrying,” he said. “Are you coming back from a funeral service?” “My husband’s,” she said, tears in her eyes. “He was an Army captain. Served in Vietnam …” her voice trailed off. “Is this home for you?” She shook her head yes. “Well,” Chris continued, “we are grateful to him and so sorry for your loss. We will keep you in our prayers.” I leaned over him and gently clasped her hand in mine. “Thank you,” she said through tears and a sweet smile. As we stood to disembark, Chris grabbed her luggage and placed it in front of her. “I heard you say you’re going to a wedding?” she asked. “Yes,” Chris replied, and Sunday is our 18th wedding anniversary.” “Wonderful, wonderful,” she said, her eyes glistening. “Don’t waste a single moment of it. Not one.” She grasped the grocery bag tightly to her chest and walked alone off of the plane. Celebrating a new marriage, celebrating 18

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They asked her if she needed anything but she declined and remained seated with the flag in her lap throughout the flight.

When they landed, Loesch’s husband, Chris, leaned over to her and asked if she was coming from a military service.

She explained that her husband, a Vietnam veteran, had passed away and she was returning home from his funeral.

“Well,” Chris said, “we are grateful to him and so sorry for your loss. We will keep you in our prayers.”

“I leaned over him and gently clasped her hand in mine. “Thank you,” she said through tears and a sweet smile,” Loesch recounts.

When they helped the woman with her luggage, she said she’d overheard that they were going to a wedding. Chris then explained that it was also their anniversary.

“Wonderful, wonderful,” the woman said, her eyes glistening. “Don’t waste a single moment of it. Not one.”

A poignant and heartwarming reminder just how precious strong, beautiful marriages are. Treasure those you love, and remember to keep our service members and their families in prayer each and every day.

Faith

Pelosi is Barred from Communion by Archbishop of San Fran

WHOA!

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Of all of the personal, bitter, hot topics that our nation is facing, perhaps none is quite as raw as abortion.

With the Supreme Court seemingly poised to overturn Roe v. Wade sometimes in the not-so-distant future, the issue is once again at the forefront of the American political theater, and the fervor is increasing by the minute.

Now, in a wild escalation of the national narrative, church is giving state a little bit of blowback.

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone announced Friday that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is barred from receiving Holy Communion due to her pro-abortion stance — marking an escalation in a decades-long tension between the Roman Catholic Church and liberal Democratic politicians on abortion.

Cordileone has written to the California Democrat, informing her that she should not present herself for Holy Communion at Mass, and that priests will not distribute communion to her if she does present herself.

He did not hold back.

“A Catholic legislator who supports procured abortion, after knowing the teaching of the Church, commits a manifestly grave sin which is a cause of most serious scandal to others. Therefore, universal Church law provides that such persons ‘are not to be admitted to Holy Communion,'” he says in the letter.

And also:

Cordileone says in his letter that he wrote to her on April 7, informing her that “should you not publicly repudiate your advocacy for abortion ‘rights’ or else refrain from referring to your Catholic faith in public and receiving Holy Communion, I would have no choice but to make a declaration, in keeping with canon 915, that you are not to be admitted to Holy Communion.” He says that since that time, she has not done so.

“Therefore, in light of my responsibility as the Archbishop of San Francisco to be ‘concerned for all the Christian faithful entrusted to [my] care” (Code of Canon Law, can. 383, §1), by means of this communication I am hereby notifying you that you are not to present yourself for Holy Communion and, should you do so, you are not to be admitted to Holy Communion, until such time as you publically repudiate your advocacy for the legitimacy of abortion and confess and receive absolution of this grave sin in the sacrament of Penance.” he said.

And with Catholics making up a rather large voting bloc in America, (and California, too), Nancy Pelosi may have to get to praying.

Of all of the personal, bitter, hot topics that our nation is facing, perhaps none is quite as raw as abortion. With the Supreme Court seemingly poised to overturn Roe v. Wade sometimes in the not-so-distant future, the issue is once again at the forefront of the American political theater, and the fervor is increasing by the minute. Now, in a wild escalation of the national narrative, church is giving state a little bit of blowback. San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone announced Friday that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is barred from receiving Holy Communion due to her pro-abortion stance — marking an escalation in a decades-long tension between the Roman Catholic Church and liberal Democratic politicians on abortion. Cordileone has written to the California Democrat, informing her that she should not present herself for Holy Communion at Mass, and that priests will not distribute communion to her if she does present herself. He did not hold back. “A Catholic legislator who supports procured abortion, after knowing the teaching of the Church, commits a manifestly grave sin which is a cause of most serious scandal to others. Therefore, universal Church law provides that such persons ‘are not to be admitted to Holy Communion,'” he says in the letter. And also: Cordileone says in his letter that he wrote to her on April 7, informing her that “should you not publicly repudiate your advocacy for abortion ‘rights’ or else refrain from referring to your Catholic faith in public and receiving Holy Communion, I would have no choice but to make a declaration, in keeping with canon 915, that you are not to be admitted to Holy Communion.” He says that since that time, she has not done so. “Therefore, in light of my responsibility as the Archbishop of San Francisco to be ‘concerned for all…

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SCOTUS Rules Against Boston After City Refused to Fly Christian Flag

The decision was seen as a win for Christians everywhere.

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In the United States, we are guaranteed the freedom to practice whichever religion we should choose, and have been since the inception of this great nation.

What we are not guaranteed, however, is freedom from religion.  We are allowed to believe what we wish, but we must also understand that this means we may bear witness to the beliefs of others who are exercising their rights.  Maybe we’ll see a yarmulke at the grocery store, or get stuck in traffic as a baptist megachurch lets out on Sunday.

It also means that all religions must be treated equally – something that the City of Boston is learning the hard way this week.

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that a program of the city of Boston that allows outside groups to fly flags at city hall must permit the flying of flag with a cross that a camp referred to as a “Christian flag.”

The question before the court was whether flying the flag as part of a government program was considered government speech if the flag belonged to a private organization, in this case, Camp Constitution. The Supreme Court ruled that it is not.

The ruling left no room for interpretation.

“We conclude that, on balance, Boston did not make the raising and flying of private groups’ flags a form of government speech,” Justice Stephen Breyer wrote in the court’s opinion, stating that as a result the city improperly violated Camp Constitution’s free speech rights.

And that’s not all:

The court’s opinion pointed to how Boston said their goal is “to accommodate all applicants” looking to hold events in the city’s “public forums,” including City Hall Plaza, and the flag flying application only asked for contact information and a short description of the event being requested.

Breyer noted that the city employee who fields flag applications testified that before Camp Constitution’s application, he had never even asked to see a flag before granting approval or even before they were raised.

“The city’s practice was to approve flag raisings, without exception,,” Breyer wrote.

The news comes as the mainstream media continues to equate the religious right with the lesser opinions they hold of conservatives in general, thereby creating a soft vilification of Christianity in the process.

In the United States, we are guaranteed the freedom to practice whichever religion we should choose, and have been since the inception of this great nation. What we are not guaranteed, however, is freedom from religion.  We are allowed to believe what we wish, but we must also understand that this means we may bear witness to the beliefs of others who are exercising their rights.  Maybe we’ll see a yarmulke at the grocery store, or get stuck in traffic as a baptist megachurch lets out on Sunday. It also means that all religions must be treated equally – something that the City of Boston is learning the hard way this week. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that a program of the city of Boston that allows outside groups to fly flags at city hall must permit the flying of flag with a cross that a camp referred to as a “Christian flag.” The question before the court was whether flying the flag as part of a government program was considered government speech if the flag belonged to a private organization, in this case, Camp Constitution. The Supreme Court ruled that it is not. The ruling left no room for interpretation. “We conclude that, on balance, Boston did not make the raising and flying of private groups’ flags a form of government speech,” Justice Stephen Breyer wrote in the court’s opinion, stating that as a result the city improperly violated Camp Constitution’s free speech rights. And that’s not all: The court’s opinion pointed to how Boston said their goal is “to accommodate all applicants” looking to hold events in the city’s “public forums,” including City Hall Plaza, and the flag flying application only asked for contact information and a short description of the event being requested. Breyer noted that the city employee who…

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