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DAVIDSON: Multitasking Renders You Less Productive

Seeking to complete multiple activities at once makes you less effective, not more.

Jeff Davidson

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The year 2020 saw a disruption in social patterns unlike anything in a long time, and 2021 doesn’t seem much different. On personal level, though, some behaviors haven’t changed much in the last decade or two. Many people still attempt to juggle competing responsibilities, tasks, and activities.

Dividing your attention to complete multiple activities at once, however, can and usually does make you less effective at everything you’re doing. From top executives to newbie hires, every career professional has numerous tasks to manage throughout the course of a day, week, month, and year.

The multitude of responsibilities on your plate requires the capacity for self-management, time management, and the effective allocation of your resources. However, don’t confuse legitimate workplace skills with the contemporary, ill-advised phenomenon called multitasking.

Trending: Fauci Thinks It Is ‘Inexplicable’ That Texas Is Re-Opening Businesses, Ending Mask Mandate

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Multitasking might appear to be a reliable way to tackle many issues that compete for your time and attention. It seems intuitive that if you can juggle both A and B concurrently, you’re achieving a productivity gain and saving significant time. But the fallacy in that argument is surmising that the human brain can double-up or triple-up on tasks with no loss of attention, focus, or effectiveness.

A plethora of psychological studies have shown that the human brain can only give “sharp attention” in one direction at a time. Seeking to give this level of attention in multiple directions yields a reverberating type of attention allotted to each activity and predictably results in a loss of mental acuity and productivity.

A clear example of multitasking is when you’re driving along the highway and speaking on a cell phone. Even if you switch to the hands-free speaker phone feature, both activities compete for your brain’s vital sharp attention. So you execute neither activity as effectively as you could by undertaking one activity at a time. It’s also prudent to point out that driving while talking on the phone-hands-free or not-contributes to distracted driving and an elevated rate of vehicular accidents.

Multitasking Coexists Best With Routine

Certainly, it’s okay to multitask while completing some repetitive and familiar work activities. You can run a print job while you work with a file on your screen, for example.

As long as the printer has adequate toner and the paper feeds through as designed, there is no deficit in multitasking in this manner. Nevertheless, for whatever task you are attempting to handle, the fact that you are running a print job at the same time is likely to diminish your overall effectiveness.

The loss in mental acuity will be relatively minor, and you might not even be aware of it. The real risk of workplace multitasking, however, is that you never quite retreat to that mental space where you can offer concerted concentration and, hence, your best work. But if you trace your actions over time, you’ll likely see that for the larger tasks you executed effectively, you stopped multitasking and focused on the task at hand.

Sending the Wrong Message

Multitasking sends a message to your subconscious that this is the way you have to proceed to stay competitive and succeed. When multitasking becomes ingrained in your psyche, you’re telling yourself deep down that you can’t make it in real estate any other way. You end up missing the benefits derived from practicing the art of “doing one thing at a time.”

Multitaskers have trouble “seeing the forest for the trees” and often fail to focus on the most critical components of their day-to-day operations, abandoning less palatable tasks because they require creativity, concentration, and analysis. As an everyday practice, repeated often, multitasking separates those who continually scramble to keep pace from those who rise to the top.

Since we all face multiple priorities on the job, it’s easy to equate managing multiple priorities with multitasking. The larger and more vital the task, the more essential it is to focus on it intently. Practice doing one thing at a time. When you’ve finished a project or have taken it as far as you can, only then should you switch focus to your second most important task, and so on.

One Thing at a Time

As your day and work unfold, mastering the art of doing one thing at a time is the best way to proceed. You may, however, multitask on issues that represent the routine or familiar and that carry few consequences for lost time on the trail. In general, though, your best strategy for high productivity is to forsake multitasking, and its false promise, as you handle the many priorities that you face.

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Fauci Thinks It Is ‘Inexplicable’ That Texas Is Re-Opening Businesses, Ending Mask Mandate

Go home, doc. The adults got it from here!

John Salvatore

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Have you wondered yet how the flu just happened to magically disappear? That’s not opinion. It is fact, apparently. In the words of Matthew McConaughey’s character from “Wolf of Wall Street,” the flu is fugazi (it’s a woozy, it’s a wazzy…fairy dust). If you still don’t believe that people are assigned covid, then you’re not paying attention. Here’s a quick example, for ya: This author knows a person who went to get tested, the place ended up taking too long so she had to leave early (without being tested) – she later received a notice that she tested positive. Funny how that worked out, huh? Check out Fauci ripping Texas Governor Greg Abbott (R) for daring to get his state back on track… https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1367510351827369985?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1367510351827369985%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thegatewaypundit.com%2F2021%2F03%2Ffauci-rips-texas-governor-reopening-businesses-ending-mask-mandate-video%2F From Fox News: Texas’s Republican Gov. Greg Abbott on Tuesday said he planned to open the state next week “100%,” roughly a year after the coronavirus pandemic broke out throughout the U.S. Abbott issued an executive order that rescinds many of the state’s previous orders, allowing all businesses in the state to fully reopen and revoking the statewide mask mandate as of next Wednesday. And in Mississippi… https://twitter.com/tatereeves/status/1366849019935412228?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1366849019935412228%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Ftherightscoop.com%2Fbreaking-mississippi-also-stopping-mask-mandate-and-reopening-all-businesses-without-restriction%2F In honor of the upcoming baseball season, let us never forget the worst first pitch in…well…maybe ever! WATCH: https://twitter.com/bennyjohnson/status/1286441829643235328?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1286441829643235328%7Ctwgr%5E&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailywire.com%2Fnews%2Fhouse-votes-to-remove-confederate-statues-justice-roger-b-taney-from-capitol

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Leaked Docs Show Migrants are Overwhelming Border Agents Thanks to Joe’s Policies

This is what 80 million people voted for!??

John Salvatore

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If you voted for a pro-choice, anti-American, beta male, weak-on-the-border presidential candidate last November, who hurt you as a child? Who taught you so poorly in your youth? Shame shame. From Axios: Fresh internal documents from the Department of Health and Human Services show how quickly the number of child migrants crossing the border is overwhelming the administration’s stretched resources. Driving the news: In the week ending March 1, the Border Patrol referred to HHS custody an average of 321 children per day, according to documents obtained by Axios. That’s up from a weekly average of 203 in late January and early February — and just 47 per day during the first week of January. The same documents, dated Tuesday, say the shelter system is at 94% occupancy and expected to reach its maximum this month. LOOK: H/T: Right Scoop

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