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DC Restaurant Unleashes on Protesters Who Accosted Kavanaugh: 'An Act of Selfishness and Void of Decency'

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A Washington restaurant condemned a group of pro-abortion agitators who drove Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh to leave the establishment Wednesday night.

“Honorable Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh and all of our other patrons at the restaurant were unduly harassed by unruly protestors while eating dinner at our Morton’s restaurant,” Morton’s said in a statement shared with Politico.

“Politics, regardless of your side or views, should not trample the freedom at play of the right to congregate and eat dinner,” the restaurant continued.

“There is a time and place for everything. Disturbing the dinner of all of our customers was an act of selfishness and void of decency,” it said.

Pro-abortion protesters targeting Kavanaugh descended on the steakhouse and started creating a ruckus, demanding that the justice be thrown out, Politico reported.

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Kavanaugh left the restaurant through a secondary exit with his security detail, the leftist group Shut Down DC, which was involved in the incident, said in a Wednesday post on Twitter.

It said Morton’s “should be ashamed for welcoming a man who so clearly hates women.”

The outfit responded to the restaurant’s statement in a tweet Friday, saying, “No rights for us, no peace for you. Get f***ed @mortons.”

It added, “PS Eat the rich.”

WARNING: The following tweet contains vulgar language that some viewers may find offensive.

The agitator outfit also called for workers in D.C. to notify it if they spot Kavanaugh or Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch, Amy Coney Barett or Clarence Thomas. All of them have been targeted over the court’s abortion ruling last month.

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“We’ll venmo you $50 for a confirmed sighting and $200 if they’re still there 30 mins after your message,” Shut Down DC tweeted.

The activists declare on their website that they are using “strategic direct action to advance justice and hold officials accountable.”

“We’re a growing movement working together and showing up for each other to preserve the pillars of democracy and fight for a better future,” the group’s website stated.

Should harassing Supreme Court justices in public be made a crime?

Kavanaugh was part of the Supreme Court majority who overturned the 1973 Roe v. Wade abortion decision in their June 24 ruling on Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization.

Since then, he has been a target of harassment, with pro-abortion groups holding demonstrations near his Maryland home to the dismay of neighbors who had to deal with the protesters’ unruly behavior.

Kavanaugh even faced a death threat. A federal grand jury on June 22 indicted a 26-year-old Simi Valley, California, resident allegedly found loitering near the justice’s home with a handgun, pepper spray, zip ties, a hammer, a screwdriver, a nail punch, a crowbar, a pistol light and duct tape.

Nicholas Roske was charged with attempting to assassinate a Supreme Court justice later that day, to which he later pleaded not guilty.

The Department of Homeland Security, in a June 7 National Terrorism Advisory System bulletin, warned that the nation could experience political violence related to the abortion ruling and other polarizing topics in recent months.

Targets of such violence may include “public gatherings, faith-based institutions, schools, racial and religious minorities, government facilities and personnel, U.S. critical infrastructure, the media, and perceived ideological opponents,” the DHS said in the bulletin.

Chasten Buttigieg, the husband of Biden administration Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, made light of the protests that forced Kavanaugh to leave Morton’s in a tweet Friday.

“Sounds like he just wanted some privacy to make his own dining decisions,” he said.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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