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Elizabeth Warren Tries Yet Again to Explain Her Claim of Being Native American. It’s Laugh Out Loud Funny.

She hasn’t learned a thing.

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren is having a really rough week after the release of her DNA test — which was done in a bid to prove she’s of Native American descent — backfired on her, showing that she has as little as .09 percent Indian blood.

Rather than just owning up to being wrong and touting her actual lineage, she’s is attempting to once again explain away the whole situation. It doesn’t appear to be going all that well for her.

“I have an election,” Warren said. “Donald Trump goes in front of crowds multiple times a week to attack me. Both of my opponents have made the same attack. I got this analysis back, and I made it public.”

Trending: American Music Icon Dead at 72; Was Set to Tour This Summer

The move turned out to be a PR disaster. While the mainstream media happily went along with the notion that 1/1,032 heritage actually makes someone Native American, many mocked Warren for the bizarre claim. Trump himself joined in, writing on Twitter: “Now that her claims of being of Indian heritage have turned out to be a scam and a lie, Elizabeth Warren should apologize for perpetrating this fraud against the American Public. Harvard called her ‘a person of color’ (amazing con), and would not have taken her otherwise!”

And Warren now says she regrets how she rolled out the DNA report — but stopped well short of apologizing.

“There’s a distinction between citizenship and ancestry. I wish I had been more mindful of that distinction,” she told the Globe. “The tribes and only the tribes determine citizenship. It’s their right as a matter of sovereignty, and they exercise that in the ways they choose to exercise it. I respect that distinction.”

Asked whether she made a mistake when she began identifying herself as Native American 30 years ago, Warren once again said she’s not really claiming to be part of any Indian group. “The distinction is: I’m not a citizen, never have claimed to be, and I wish I had been more mindful of that 30 years ago,” Warren said. “I wish I had been clearer about that — been more mindful, is the word.”

Warren was condemned for implying she was among the nearly 300,000 members of the Cherokee Nation in a statement released earlier this week. Warren is ineligible to join the group because she has no relatives listed on the Dawes Rolls, a hundred-year-old set of government documents that list Cherokee members.

As if that’s not rough enough, a descendent of Pocahontas, the famous 17-century Powhatan princess, has asked Warren for an apology for her wrongful claim of Native American ancestry, citing she did so for political gain.

“It did prove that she wasn’t the Cherokee Indian that she was claiming to be for so long,” Debbie White Dove Porreco said on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “I think she’s guilty of claiming she’s an American Indian but has no proof — and then [is] using it for applications for college and for political reasons.”

“She needs to … apologize to everybody for what she has done,” Porreco said, adding that Native Americans “feel betrayed, they feel disappointed.”

Much of the controversy over this situation stems from the fact that Warren listed herself as Native American in the Association of American Law School Directory and, according to a report from the Boston Globe, changed her ethnicity from white to Native American at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she taught from 1987 to 1995, and also at Harvard University Law School.

Some of her most ardent critics claim that her declaring herself to be Native American is what helped her land the Harvard gig.

Even more troubling is the fact that Fordham Law Review actually gave Warren the title of Harvard Law’s “first woman of color.”

Source: Daily Wire

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American Music Icon Dead at 72; Was Set to Tour This Summer

Rest in peace, amigo.

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When it comes to gritty guitars and even grittier songs, there is no act quite like that little ol’ band from Texas. ZZ Top mainlined American blues standards directly into the electric era of 1970’s rock, and then reinvented the genre once again with the synthesizers of the 1980’s.  From there, the band toured the world incessantly, bringing their grimy grooves and unforgettable stage presence to audiences from Dusseldorf to Delaware. Now, just weeks before the band was set to take to the road once again, one member of the holy triumvirate of honky-tonk has passed away. Dusty Hill, the bassist for ZZ Top, has died. He was 72. Billy Gibbons and Frank Beard of the Texas-based trio issued a statement to Variety on Tuesday, writing: “We are saddened by the news today that our Compadre, Dusty Hill, has passed away in his sleep at home in Houston, TX. We, along with legions of ZZ Top fans around the world, will miss your steadfast presence, your good nature and enduring commitment to providing that monumental bottom to the ‘Top’. We will forever be connected to that ‘Blues Shuffle in C.’” And then, echoing the sentiments of music fans the nation over: “You will be missed greatly, amigo,” the statement added. We couldn’t have said it better ourselves, so we’ll just leave you all with a classic. Make sure to turns those speakers up, y’all. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5WB5ouP-8c  

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Mask Mandates Coming Back to Capitol Hill After CDC Switcheroo

This isn’t likely to go over well with some lawmakers.

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With the “delta” variant now raging in some parts of the country, and breakthrough infections of vaccinated individuals continuing to be reported, the CDC has made a stark decision, stating that even vaccinated folks should be wearing a mask when they are indoors or in parts of the country with high COVID transmission rates. This has now prompted the House of Representatives to bring back a previously criticized policy themselves. Capitol Attending Physician Brian Monahan said late Tuesday that the House of Representatives is reinstating its mask mandate – and therefore the threat of fines to members who don’t comply – following updated guidance from the Centers from Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on the delta variant of the coronavirus. The White House also appears to be going back to mandated masks. A White House press representative was seen Tuesday swapping a sign saying people are required to wear masks if unvaccinated with another saying masks are required regardless of vaccination status. Monahan didn’t leave much room for interpretation. “For the Congress, representing a collection of individuals traveling weekly from various risk areas (both high and low rates of disease transmission), all individuals should wear a well-fitted, medical-grade filtration mask (for example an ear loop surgical mask or a KN95 mask) when they are in an interior space,” Monahan said in a letter sent to congressional staffers. The move will almost certainly see pushback from the far right side of the aisle, where the mandating of masks has been a very unpopular policy, and a point of contention in almost every arena in which it has been implemented.

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