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Facebook Reexamining Their Ban of Donald Trump

But is this just another example of their unchecked power to control free speech?

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Facebook

As certain aspects of his world continue to close in around him, Donald Trump could find life anew online in the coming weeks.

Trump’s former personal attorney Rudy Giuliani saw his Manhattan office and apartment raided just days ago, in what appeared on the surface to be an investigation into the former NYC Mayor’s work in Ukraine.  The federal agents who executed the search warrant came away with several electronic devices, including Rudy’s cell phone, and this has some within the Trump inner circle beginning to fret.

All this while Trump is a persona non grata in most online spaces, with the former President reduced to issuing his missives via press release or PAC.

That could be changing in the coming days, however.

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The Facebook Oversight Board, a sort of supreme court that delivers rulings and can overturn moderation decisions made by the platform, will deliver its decision on the fate of former President Donald Trump’s page this week.

“The Oversight Board will announce its decision on the case concerning former US President Trump… on May 5, 2021, at approximately 9:00 a.m. EDT,” the board posted on Twitter.

Trump is also permanently banned from Twitter; a move that saw him escalate his feud with the social media platform.

“Twitter stock ‘plunged’ as results are no longer cutting it for investors,” Trump wrote, calling the platform “boring” and adding: “I guess that’s what happens when you go against FREEDOM OF SPEECH! It will happen to others also.”

Of course, the drawn out review process that Facebook is engaging in worries some freedom experts who believe that this could signify the beginning of a shift toward a technologically-controlled oligarchy in this nation.

Opinion

Russia Rebukes USA with Childish, Gibberish Response on Sanctions

The Kremlin isn’t quite as sharp as it used to be.

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Russia

The world fears Russia, this much is ostensibly true, but is it for the right reasons?

Sure, the wannabe superpower does own a rather large arsenal of nuclear weapons.  And Vladimir Putin certainly carries himself with all of the tact of a frat boy with a jacked up truck who’s very obviously compensating for something. But the Kremlin’s negotiating tactics have lately been closer to North Korea’s pedantic missile-waving contests than any chess-like, super-brain maneuvering. In fact, the military buildup near Ukraine and this prolonged “negotiation” about it feels rather beneath the Kremlin, doesn’t it?

Take, for instance, the latest rebuke from the Russian government on the US threat of sanctioning Vladimir Putin personally.

Russia on Wednesday dismissed the latest warning from President Joe Biden, who said the previous day that the U.S. could seek to sanction President Vladimir Putin personally if he sends forces across the border to invade Ukraine. Putin’s spokesman said any such sanctions would be “destructive,” but not “painful” because, according to the Kremlin press secretary, Russia’s senior leaders don’t hold overseas bank accounts or assets.

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Speaking with reporters on Tuesday, President Biden said that if Putin were to send the roughly 100,000 troops he’s massed along Ukraine’s borders into the U.S.-allied country, “it would be the largest invasion since World War II. It would change the world.”

Asked if his administration would sanction Putin personally, Mr. Biden replied: “Yes… I would see that.”

The Russian response was pure gibberish, and gave the impression of a young child smashing words together in an attempt to sound smart.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov delivered the rebuttal to the latest warning from Washington on Wednesday. He was quoted by Russian state news agency RIA Novosti as attributing the notion of sanctions against Putin or other Russian leaders to “U.S. congressmen and senators who are not entirely familiar with this topic,” and who would have been wise to first consult “those who are professionally engaged in Russia.”

He said it had “long been prohibited for representatives of senior leadership and officials” to hold foreign assets. “Therefore, of course, such a formulation of the question is absolutely not painful for any one of the representatives of the top management.”

This certainly isn’t the sort of cunning behavior that the world seems to expect from Russia, and it begs the question:  Is this Ukraine nonsense nothing but a big bluff from the belligerent mind of Putin?

The world fears Russia, this much is ostensibly true, but is it for the right reasons? Sure, the wannabe superpower does own a rather large arsenal of nuclear weapons.  And Vladimir Putin certainly carries himself with all of the tact of a frat boy with a jacked up truck who’s very obviously compensating for something. But the Kremlin’s negotiating tactics have lately been closer to North Korea’s pedantic missile-waving contests than any chess-like, super-brain maneuvering. In fact, the military buildup near Ukraine and this prolonged “negotiation” about it feels rather beneath the Kremlin, doesn’t it? Take, for instance, the latest rebuke from the Russian government on the US threat of sanctioning Vladimir Putin personally. Russia on Wednesday dismissed the latest warning from President Joe Biden, who said the previous day that the U.S. could seek to sanction President Vladimir Putin personally if he sends forces across the border to invade Ukraine. Putin’s spokesman said any such sanctions would be “destructive,” but not “painful” because, according to the Kremlin press secretary, Russia’s senior leaders don’t hold overseas bank accounts or assets. Speaking with reporters on Tuesday, President Biden said that if Putin were to send the roughly 100,000 troops he’s massed along Ukraine’s borders into the U.S.-allied country, “it would be the largest invasion since World War II. It would change the world.” Asked if his administration would sanction Putin personally, Mr. Biden replied: “Yes… I would see that.” The Russian response was pure gibberish, and gave the impression of a young child smashing words together in an attempt to sound smart. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov delivered the rebuttal to the latest warning from Washington on Wednesday. He was quoted by Russian state news agency RIA Novosti as attributing the notion of sanctions against Putin or other Russian leaders to “U.S. congressmen and…

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Opinion

Americans Groan as SCOTUS Opening Invites Further Dysfunction

Any nomination by Biden is sure to kick off a firestorm of controversy, grinding the gears of government to a halt.

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The sheer lack of progress that our political machine has made over the course of the last year is laughable.  The bipartisan bickering and nitpicking has gotten to an abominable point here in the United States, allowing our public servants to cash in on their elected positions while the American people suffer mightily.

It hasn’t been this bad in years, maybe decades, and the latest news out of the Supreme Court could make things even less manageable on Capitol Hill.

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer plans to retire, setting up a seismic confirmation battle at the start of a midterm election year as President Joe Biden tries to find his footing with his agenda stalled and Democrats divided in Congress.

Breyer, 83, is expected to stay on until the end of the court term and until a replacement is confirmed, a well-placed source familiar with the matter told CNN.

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He informed Biden of his plans last week and will formally announce his retirement at a White House event with the President as early as Thursday, two sources told CNN.

The news is sure to set off a firestorm of political posturing, with the GOP and Democratic Party likely to lock horns over whomever the Biden administration chooses to nominate.

Further more, some activists legislators on the left may now feel emboldened enough to make life difficult for the President should his choice not be radical enough.

 

The sheer lack of progress that our political machine has made over the course of the last year is laughable.  The bipartisan bickering and nitpicking has gotten to an abominable point here in the United States, allowing our public servants to cash in on their elected positions while the American people suffer mightily. It hasn’t been this bad in years, maybe decades, and the latest news out of the Supreme Court could make things even less manageable on Capitol Hill. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer plans to retire, setting up a seismic confirmation battle at the start of a midterm election year as President Joe Biden tries to find his footing with his agenda stalled and Democrats divided in Congress. Breyer, 83, is expected to stay on until the end of the court term and until a replacement is confirmed, a well-placed source familiar with the matter told CNN. He informed Biden of his plans last week and will formally announce his retirement at a White House event with the President as early as Thursday, two sources told CNN. The news is sure to set off a firestorm of political posturing, with the GOP and Democratic Party likely to lock horns over whomever the Biden administration chooses to nominate. Further more, some activists legislators on the left may now feel emboldened enough to make life difficult for the President should his choice not be radical enough.  

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