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Flashback: Schiff Says Trump Could Sell Alaska to Russia, Have Kushner ‘Run the Country’

Congressman Funnyguy.

John Salvatore

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The day after the nation watched the Kansas City Chiefs defeat the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl 54, far-left Rep. Adam Schiff (CA) took to the Senate floor to say some pretty crazy stuff – even for him.

Trump might sell Alaska to Russia if they rig the election in his favor this November? Trump might reside at Mar-A-Lago and let his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, run the nation? What the heck is the guy talking about?

Schiff clearly represents everything wrong with ungrateful Americans today. And it’s sad to see.

Trending: Tokyo Woke No Mo’: IOC Bans BLM Apparel for Olympics

WATCH:

It looks like Schiff got caught lying – again. Go figure.

Here’s the scoop, via Politico:

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff appears to have mischaracterized a text message exchange between two players in the Ukraine saga, according to documents obtained by POLITICO — a possible error the GOP will likely criticize as another example of the Democrats’ rushed effort to impeach President Donald Trump.

The issue arose when Schiff (D-Calif.) sent a letter to House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) last week summarizing a trove of evidence from Lev Parnas, an indicted former associate of Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani. In one section of the letter, Schiff claims that Parnas “continued to try to arrange a meeting with President Zelensky,” citing a specific text message exchange where Parnas tells Giuliani: “trying to get us mr Z.” The remainder of the exchange — which was attached to Schiff’s letter — was redacted.

Continued:

But an unredacted version of the exchange shows that several days later, Parnas sent Giuliani a word document that appears to show notes from an interview with Mykola Zlochevsky, the founder of Burisma, followed by a text message to Giuliani that states: “mr Z answers my brother.” That suggests Parnas was referring to Zlochevsky not Zelensky.

The word document contains a series of questions and answers, but doesn’t identify who is doing the asking or answering. Yet the questions center on the hiring practices at Burisma, while the responses include statements such as “we wanted to build Burisma as [an] international company” and “we also thought it would help in Ukraine to have strong international board figures,” which seems to point to Zlochevsky — not the Ukrainian president — as the respondent.

WATCH:

WATCH:

POTUS called out Schiff for being the lying [insert word here] that he is. And in typical Trump fashion, he spoke the truth and did so with confidence.

See for yourself…

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CDC Readies Cruises, Complete with Human Guinea Pigs

Fingers crossed!

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As the world prepares for its grand reopening, there are a number of high value industries that are eagerly awaiting permission from medical authorities to resume operations. First and foremost, there are the service industries:  Places like restaurants, bars, music venues, and sports arenas whose entire livelihood depends on whether or not people are being allowed to gather in public.  While many of these venues are now beginning to ramp up their capacity, there are issues bringing some of these workers back into the fold thanks to the enhanced unemployment benefits provided by the federal government. And then there’s the tourism industry, whose regulatory structure is far more susceptible to interference by government agencies. Now, after over a year of stagnation, it appears as though at least one facet of this wide-ranging corporate amalgam will be given a chance to sail on. Cruise lines can soon begin trial voyages in U.S. waters with volunteer passengers helping test whether the ships can sail safely during a pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave ship operators final technical guidelines Wednesday for the trial runs. The CDC action is a step toward resuming cruises in U.S. waters, possibly by July, for the first time since March 2020. A spokeswoman for the cruise industry’s trade group said the group was reviewing the CDC instructions. So, how will this work? Each practice cruise — they’ll run two to seven days — must have enough passengers to meet at least 10% of the ship’s capacity. Volunteers must be 18 or older and either fully vaccinated or free of medical conditions that would put them at high risk for severe COVID-19. The ship operator must tell passengers that they are simulating untested safety measures “and that sailing during a pandemic is an inherently risky activity,” the…

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Strange New Correlation Discovered Between COVID and Bald Men

This strain of coronavirus just keeps getting weirder.

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From the very onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the medical community appeared stumped.  Sure, this was a novel virus and, as such, came complete with a number of strange and unknown consequences. There were your “long-haulers”; folks who seemed to continually have issues recovering from the illness.  Others lost their senses of taste and smell, sometimes for months on end.  There were even reports of so-called “COVID toes” – an ailment that affected the coloration of the skin on toes and fingers of a small percentage of patients. Now, in another odd correlation within the coronavirus spectrum, it appears that men who’d gone bald are at particular risk for certain side effects of COVID-19. New research suggests they spend up to twice as long in hospital with Covid than those who still have a full head of hair. Science seems to have at least some idea of why this is. They are also admitted to intensive care in higher numbers. Scientists say men’s Covid vulnerability largely comes down to male sex hormones called androgens. Men who are genetically more sensitive to androgens appear to be more likely to suffer severe Covid. They are also more likely to have hair loss, called androgenetic alopecia, which affects around half of men over the age of 50. The science seemed to back this up. A team of US doctors measured men’s sensitivity to androgens by counting a chemical called CAG. High levels indicate that a man is more likely to have hair loss. Of 65 men hospitalised with the infection, those with high CAG levels had worse Covid outcomes in the 60 days following their hospitlisation. They spent 47 days in hospital, on average, and 70.6 per cent were admitted to ICU. For comparison, those with low CAG levels spent an average of 25 days…

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