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Former CIA Chief Says MAGA is ‘Our Taliban’

A despicable comparison, indeed.

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Joe Biden’s campaign promises were largely comprised of vagaries and reversals.  First, he insisted that he would undo any number of Donald Trump’s policies “on day one”, which, of course, had the “resistance” crowd foaming at the mouth.

And then, in an appeal to the softer, more empathic among the liberal left, Biden redundantly repeated a number of stump-speech lines about being a “healer” or a “uniter” or, his favorite, “a President for every American”.

But we should have known better.  There was no way that Joe Biden was going to get petty political bickering to stop.

So, instead of being “healed”, were hearing more and more harmful slurs being bandied about.

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Former CIA Director Gen. Michael Hayden was widely panned for a retweet that signaled he equated President Trump’s supporters in the United States with the Taliban in Afghanistan.

On Thursday, Hayden retweeted a split image. The top showed black-clad Islamic militants waving guns and flags from a line of cars with a caption reading: “Their Taliban.” Beneath that was a line of pickup trucks hoisting American flags and “Trump 2020” flags with the caption: “Our Taliban”

Twitter users were quick to pounce.

While some of the replies seemed to concur with Hayden’s sentiment – that Trump supporters and the Taliban are essentially the same – the vast majority were critical.

“Wow. Hate much,” tweeted one user.

“Wow, with all of your experience, if you can’t tell the difference between a real threat and media hype…and retweeting this crap? Swampier than most,” wrote another user.

“The CIA is a joke,” read another Tweet.

The tweet was circulating just days after the actual Taliban managed to take over the entirety of Afghanistan in an astounding eleven days.

Entertainment

Spotify Chooses Joe Rogan Over Neil Young After Egregious Ultimatum

Young thought that he had enough clout to make Spotify blink. He did not.

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Earlier in the week, a Canadian folk rocker with a penchant for sticking his nose into American culture and politics gave streaming giant Spotify an ultimatum:  Either cancel immensely popular podcaster Joe Rogan, or pull Neil Young’s music from the platform.

Young, whose nosiness in matters not of his own was forever enshrined in Lynyrd Skynyrd’s seminal hit “Sweet Home Alabama”, told his own streaming service that Joe Rogan’s “misinformation” was enough to make him want to leave the platform.  Young appeared to believe that he had enough clout to make Spotify blink.

He did not.

Spotify Technology is removing Neil Young’s music, as the folk-rock star isn’t wavering in his objections to Joe Rogan’s podcast.

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The “Heart of Gold” and “Harvest Moon” singer earlier this week penned an open letter to his manager and label asking them to remove his music from the service, saying it is spreading fake information about COVID-19 vaccines through Mr. Rogan’s show. “They can have Rogan or Young. Not both,” he wrote.

Spotify was unapologetic.

“We want all the world’s music and audio content to be available to Spotify users. With that comes great responsibility in balancing both safety for listeners and freedom for creators,” a Spotify spokesman said. The company has detailed content policies in place and has removed over 20,000 Covid-related podcast episodes since the start of the pandemic, he added.

“We regret Neil’s decision to remove his music from Spotify, but hope to welcome him back soon,” he said.

Rogan’s allegedly controversial “misinformation”, (which is literally a set of two-way conversations being misconstrued to manufacture some faux outrage), has been defended by Spotify several times in recent weeks, often with a reminder about the First Amendment included.

Earlier in the week, a Canadian folk rocker with a penchant for sticking his nose into American culture and politics gave streaming giant Spotify an ultimatum:  Either cancel immensely popular podcaster Joe Rogan, or pull Neil Young’s music from the platform. Young, whose nosiness in matters not of his own was forever enshrined in Lynyrd Skynyrd’s seminal hit “Sweet Home Alabama”, told his own streaming service that Joe Rogan’s “misinformation” was enough to make him want to leave the platform.  Young appeared to believe that he had enough clout to make Spotify blink. He did not. Spotify Technology is removing Neil Young’s music, as the folk-rock star isn’t wavering in his objections to Joe Rogan’s podcast. The “Heart of Gold” and “Harvest Moon” singer earlier this week penned an open letter to his manager and label asking them to remove his music from the service, saying it is spreading fake information about COVID-19 vaccines through Mr. Rogan’s show. “They can have Rogan or Young. Not both,” he wrote. Spotify was unapologetic. “We want all the world’s music and audio content to be available to Spotify users. With that comes great responsibility in balancing both safety for listeners and freedom for creators,” a Spotify spokesman said. The company has detailed content policies in place and has removed over 20,000 Covid-related podcast episodes since the start of the pandemic, he added. “We regret Neil’s decision to remove his music from Spotify, but hope to welcome him back soon,” he said. Rogan’s allegedly controversial “misinformation”, (which is literally a set of two-way conversations being misconstrued to manufacture some faux outrage), has been defended by Spotify several times in recent weeks, often with a reminder about the First Amendment included.

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Opinion

Russia Rebukes USA with Childish, Gibberish Response on Sanctions

The Kremlin isn’t quite as sharp as it used to be.

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Russia

The world fears Russia, this much is ostensibly true, but is it for the right reasons?

Sure, the wannabe superpower does own a rather large arsenal of nuclear weapons.  And Vladimir Putin certainly carries himself with all of the tact of a frat boy with a jacked up truck who’s very obviously compensating for something. But the Kremlin’s negotiating tactics have lately been closer to North Korea’s pedantic missile-waving contests than any chess-like, super-brain maneuvering. In fact, the military buildup near Ukraine and this prolonged “negotiation” about it feels rather beneath the Kremlin, doesn’t it?

Take, for instance, the latest rebuke from the Russian government on the US threat of sanctioning Vladimir Putin personally.

Russia on Wednesday dismissed the latest warning from President Joe Biden, who said the previous day that the U.S. could seek to sanction President Vladimir Putin personally if he sends forces across the border to invade Ukraine. Putin’s spokesman said any such sanctions would be “destructive,” but not “painful” because, according to the Kremlin press secretary, Russia’s senior leaders don’t hold overseas bank accounts or assets.

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Speaking with reporters on Tuesday, President Biden said that if Putin were to send the roughly 100,000 troops he’s massed along Ukraine’s borders into the U.S.-allied country, “it would be the largest invasion since World War II. It would change the world.”

Asked if his administration would sanction Putin personally, Mr. Biden replied: “Yes… I would see that.”

The Russian response was pure gibberish, and gave the impression of a young child smashing words together in an attempt to sound smart.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov delivered the rebuttal to the latest warning from Washington on Wednesday. He was quoted by Russian state news agency RIA Novosti as attributing the notion of sanctions against Putin or other Russian leaders to “U.S. congressmen and senators who are not entirely familiar with this topic,” and who would have been wise to first consult “those who are professionally engaged in Russia.”

He said it had “long been prohibited for representatives of senior leadership and officials” to hold foreign assets. “Therefore, of course, such a formulation of the question is absolutely not painful for any one of the representatives of the top management.”

This certainly isn’t the sort of cunning behavior that the world seems to expect from Russia, and it begs the question:  Is this Ukraine nonsense nothing but a big bluff from the belligerent mind of Putin?

The world fears Russia, this much is ostensibly true, but is it for the right reasons? Sure, the wannabe superpower does own a rather large arsenal of nuclear weapons.  And Vladimir Putin certainly carries himself with all of the tact of a frat boy with a jacked up truck who’s very obviously compensating for something. But the Kremlin’s negotiating tactics have lately been closer to North Korea’s pedantic missile-waving contests than any chess-like, super-brain maneuvering. In fact, the military buildup near Ukraine and this prolonged “negotiation” about it feels rather beneath the Kremlin, doesn’t it? Take, for instance, the latest rebuke from the Russian government on the US threat of sanctioning Vladimir Putin personally. Russia on Wednesday dismissed the latest warning from President Joe Biden, who said the previous day that the U.S. could seek to sanction President Vladimir Putin personally if he sends forces across the border to invade Ukraine. Putin’s spokesman said any such sanctions would be “destructive,” but not “painful” because, according to the Kremlin press secretary, Russia’s senior leaders don’t hold overseas bank accounts or assets. Speaking with reporters on Tuesday, President Biden said that if Putin were to send the roughly 100,000 troops he’s massed along Ukraine’s borders into the U.S.-allied country, “it would be the largest invasion since World War II. It would change the world.” Asked if his administration would sanction Putin personally, Mr. Biden replied: “Yes… I would see that.” The Russian response was pure gibberish, and gave the impression of a young child smashing words together in an attempt to sound smart. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov delivered the rebuttal to the latest warning from Washington on Wednesday. He was quoted by Russian state news agency RIA Novosti as attributing the notion of sanctions against Putin or other Russian leaders to “U.S. congressmen and…

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