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Free Speech Win: Supreme Court Sides with Cheerleader Tossed from Squad after Cursing Online

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the free speech rights of a high school cheerleader who was tossed her off the squad.

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Tucker Carlson

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the free speech rights of a high school cheerleader who said her school had no right to toss her off the squad over a profanity-laden post on social media.

Brandi Levy, who was a 14-year-old cheerleader at a Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania, high school at the time, went on a tear on Snapchat with a vulgar tirade. Once the school found out about her posting, though, officials tossed her off the cheer squad saying she was a bad role model for the school. But Levy said that since she was not on school grounds and since she made the comments on her private Snapchat account, the school punished her illicitly and violated her right to free speech.

On Wednesday, in an 8-1 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) agreed with the teenager.

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Per Just The News, “Justice Stephen Breyer in writing the court’s opinion stated the suspension violated Levy’s First Amendment rights.”

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Still, Breyer added that schools still have the right to discipline students for off-campus behavior in some instances.

According to the Associated Press, Breyer wrote that “we do not believe the special characteristics that give schools additional license to regulate student speech always disappear when a school regulates speech that takes place off campus. The school’s regulatory interests remain significant in some off-campus circumstances.”

The case came to the SCOTUS after a lower court ruled in Levy’s favor and ordered the school to reinstate her to the cheerleading team.

The school, though, took the case to the highest court insisting that the lower court made the wrong ruling.

Breyer added, “It might be tempting to dismiss [the student’s] words as unworthy of the robust First Amendment protections discussed herein. But sometimes it is necessary to protect the superfluous in order to preserve the necessary.”

Anytime a government entity loses the capability to quash free speech is a good thing.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Facebook at: facebook.com/Warner.Todd.Huston.

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Swastika Found Engraved at State Department Draws Condemnation

The Secretary of State was LIVID.

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There’s nothing funny about the Nazi regime, and everyone knows it, except for a certain breed of adolescent dolt who’s simply looking to appear edgy and dangerous as some hormonal ploy to attract a mate. These are the kids that would draw toothbrush mustaches on the faces in the magazines, or throw up a sig heil behind the teacher’s back for a laugh. But this phase almost always fades as the years climb on, and most of these young idiots looks back at themselves in a perpetual state of cringe. This leaves us to assume that anyone continuing to exude such Hitleresque nonsense into adulthood is doing so very purposefully, and not with the naïveté of their younger years. At the State Department, this reality is causing a bit of concern. A swastika carved into an elevator car has been discovered at the State Department in Washington—in a location within the building’s security perimeter. The elevator is close to the office of the special envoy charged with monitoring and opposing anti-semitism, Axios reports. Secretary of State Antony Blinken emailed all employees Tuesday about the discovery. Blinken was livid. “The hateful graffiti has been removed and this incident will be investigated,” he wrote. Blinken is the stepson of a Holocaust survivor, per the Washington Post, and has emphasized the threat of anti-semitism, which he wrote “isn’t a relic of the past.” Officials have said President Biden will nominate an ambassador-at-large to deal with the problem; the Jerusalem Post called for such a position in an editorial this month. Hate has been on the rise in America in recent years, as white supremacist groups continue to recruit and spread their message online, and then, often violently, in real life.

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International Athletic Authorities Set to Review Marijuana Use Policies

The marijuana revolution is going global.

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Things are changing rapidly within society here in the 21st century, as our governing bodies finally begin to take a look at some long-held, but naive beliefs about certain medical plants. In the United States, for instance, the marijuana revolution is happening right before our eyes, as more than half the states in the nation now allow citizens to indulge in some form of legal, medicinal, or decriminalized use of the plant.  About a third of the states even allow for recreational use, and those locales have been enjoying both incredible tax revenues from the highly-regulated sale of legal weed, as well as the societal benefits that come along with – including a sharp decrease in the use of more dangerous drugs. Now it appears as though this sentiment is going global. Sebastian Coe wants to ensure what happened this month to American sprinter Sha’Carri Richardson won’t knock another athlete out of the Olympics in the future. Richardson, who won the 100 meters at the U.S. trials last month, didn’t travel to Japan for the Tokyo Games after being caught smoking marijuana. Coe, the president of international track body World Athletics, said Tuesday the absence of the 21-year-old Richardson is “a loss to the competition” and added he supports a review of marijuana’s status as a doping substance in light of her case. And he wasn’t mincing his words. “It should be. It’s sensible,” Coe said when asked if a rethink was needed about marijuana being on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s prohibited list. “Nothing is set in tablets of stone,” said Coe, who has asked track’s independent Athletics Integrity Unit to work with WADA. “You adapt and occasionally reassess.” Congressional leaders on both sides of the aisle have expressed optimism that a new bill meant to decriminalize marijuana at the…

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