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Opinion

Georgia Governor’s Race Not Over Yet as Dem Refuses to Concede

Stacy Abrams is making it very difficult for Georgians to move forward on Wednesday.

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The main story of the American midterm elections of 2018 has been written, and it goes a little something like this:

Democrats predictably snagged the House while republicans kept the Senate, meaning that Donald Trump will have some uphill battles to face in doing forward with his stated agenda.

But not every storyline from Tuesday has been wrapped up neatly with a bow.  Take Georgia’s gubernatorial contest for instance, where democratic nominee Stacy Abrams has declined to concede, believing that the election will be subject to a December runoff.

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Early Wednesday morning, Georgia’s Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams refused to concede to Republican challenger Brian Kemp.

“Votes remain to be counted. There are voices that were waiting to be heard,” Abrams said before a crowd of supporters. “Across our state, folks are opening up the dreams of voters in absentee ballots and we believe our chance for a stronger Georgia is just within reach. But we cannot seize it until all voices are heard. And I promise you tonight we are going to make sure that every vote is counted – every single vote.”

Just how far off is Abrams?

As Abrams gave her speech, NBC News reported on screen that with 99% of precincts reporting, the gubernatorial hopeful was down by 115,362 votes, or approximately 3%.

According to The New York Times, with 100% of precincts reporting as of publication, Abrams still trails Kemp by 94,468 votes, or approximately 2.5%.

Georgia state law dictates that if no candidate receives a majority of votes, the top two candidates enter into a runoff election. According to NBC News, such a runoff would take place on December 4.

Abrams’ opponent Brian Kemp is the current Secretary of State in the state of Georgia, with his office being responsible for electoral oversight in The Peach State.  This fact has added an unnecessary amount of drama to the proceedings, with Abrams doing little to shore up voter confidence in Kemp’s staff to remain neutral in the election.

 

 

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