Connect with us

News

HERE WE GO: First Republican Rep. Comes Out & Calls For Trump’s Impeachment (Details)

The MSM is about to have a field day…

John Salvatore

Published

on

Well, this isn’t good.

The first sitting Republican Congressman has pretty much declared that President Trump needs to be impeached.

The media is sure to run with this story like they’re being chased.

Trending: NYC Police Chief Confirms: Nearly ‘All’ Arrested Rioters Will Be Released Without Bail

Check it out…

take our poll - story continues below

Trump or Biden, who will win?

  • Why wait until November 3? Show all of America who you're voting for in 2020  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

From Politico:

Michigan Rep. Justin Amash became the first Republican lawmaker to declare that President Donald Trump committed impeachable offenses and that Attorney General William Barr “deliberately misrepresented” special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

Amash, whose libertarian views often put him at odds with Trump and his fellow Republicans, posted a series of tweets Saturday afternoon outlining positions that even some Democrats have been unwilling to embrace — an extraordinary development that comes as Democratic leaders face increasing pressure from progressives to launch impeachment proceedings.

His tweets:

Here are my principal conclusions:
1. Attorney General Barr has deliberately misrepresented Mueller’s report.
2. President Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct.
3. Partisanship has eroded our system of checks and balances.
4. Few members of Congress have read the report.

I offer these conclusions only after having read Mueller’s redacted report carefully and completely, having read or watched pertinent statements and testimony, and having discussed this matter with my staff, who thoroughly reviewed materials and provided me with further analysis.

In comparing Barr’s principal conclusions, congressional testimony, and other statements to Mueller’s report, it is clear that Barr intended to mislead the public about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s analysis and findings.

Barr’s misrepresentations are significant but often subtle, frequently taking the form of sleight-of-hand qualifications or logical fallacies, which he hopes people will not notice.

Under our Constitution, the president “shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” While “high Crimes and Misdemeanors” is not defined, the context implies conduct that violates the public trust.

Contrary to Barr’s portrayal, Mueller’s report reveals that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment.

In fact, Mueller’s report identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice, and undoubtedly any person who is not the president of the United States would be indicted based on such evidence.

Impeachment, which is a special form of indictment, does not even require probable cause that a crime (e.g., obstruction of justice) has been committed; it simply requires a finding that an official has engaged in careless, abusive, corrupt, or otherwise dishonorable conduct.

While impeachment should be undertaken only in extraordinary circumstances, the risk we face in an environment of extreme partisanship is not that Congress will employ it as a remedy too often but rather that Congress will employ it so rarely that it cannot deter misconduct.

Our system of checks and balances relies on each branch’s jealously guarding its powers and upholding its duties under our Constitution. When loyalty to a political party or to an individual trumps loyalty to the Constitution, the Rule of Law—the foundation of liberty—crumbles.

We’ve witnessed members of Congress from both parties shift their views 180 degrees—on the importance of character, on the principles of obstruction of justice—depending on whether they’re discussing Bill Clinton or Donald Trump.

Few members of Congress even read Mueller’s report; their minds were made up based on partisan affiliation—and it showed, with representatives and senators from both parties issuing definitive statements on the 448-page report’s conclusions within just hours of its release.

America’s institutions depend on officials to uphold both the rules and spirit of our constitutional system even when to do so is personally inconvenient or yields a politically unfavorable outcome. Our Constitution is brilliant and awesome; it deserves a government to match it.

Let’s hear your thoughts in the comments section…

Save conservative media!

News

Trump Steps Back From Insurrection Act, But Not Before Military Leaders Issue Strong Rebuke

Published

on

President Donald Trump has signaled that he is going to step back from threats he’s made concerning the deployment of federal troops to states that are refusing to use the military to quell riots and violent protests, but not before leaders in the military issued sharp rebukes for his position on the matter. Trump spoke with with former White House spokesman Sean Spicer on Newsmax TV Wednesday saying, “I don’t think we’ll have to,” referring, of course, to the invoking of the Insurrection Act, which would dispatch active-duty military troops on the streets to help reign in the current chaos. “We have very strong powers to do it. The National Guard is customary, and we have a very powerful National Guard, over 300,000 men and women, and we can do pretty much whatever we want as far as that,” the president said. “But as far as going beyond that, sure, if it was necessary.” via The Washington Examiner: On a leaked call Monday, Trump called governors “weak” and urged them, with the backing of Defense Secretary Mark Esper and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley, to call up more National Guard members to quell protests in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody. “If a city or state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them,” he said. Esper went on to say on Wednesday morning that the military lexicon was inappropriate. “I’ve always believed and continue to believe that the National Guard is best suited for performing domestic support to civil authorities in these situations,” Esper stated. “I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act.” The former National Guardsman…

Continue Reading

News

Lindsey Graham Weighs In On Mattis Criticism of Trump, Says He’s ‘Buying Into A Narrative’

Published

on

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on some rather brutal comments made by former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis about President Donald Trump, stating that he was “buying into a narrative” after slamming the president for his handling of the riots and protests in light of the death of George Floyd. Graham made an appearance on Fox & Friends where he said that Mattis isn’t understanding, despite the several years he spent serving in his administration, that Trump is the victim of a political blame game. “The one thing I would tell Gen. Mattis is that you don’t quite understand that from the time President Trump wakes up until he goes to bed, there’s an effort to destroy his presidency. … Nobody wants to send active-duty troops into American cities unless they are invited and unless they are absolutely necessary,” Graham said during the interview. Here’s more from The Washington Examiner: “But I would say that Gov. Cuomo should have called out the National Guard early on, and I would ask Gen. Mattis to look at the behavior of the politicians in these cities and see if you can find fault with them,” he said, referring to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. “It is so fashionable to blame President Trump for every wrong in America, and he can be a handful, and can he do better? Yes. But the problems we have in America today weren’t caused by Donald Trump, and hopefully, he can help the nation heal some of these problems.” Mattis claimed that Trump was ordering the National Guard to “violate the constitutional rights of their fellow citizens” so that the president could have a “bizarre photo op” in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church near the White House on Monday. Trump responded to Mattis’s condemnation by tweeting,…

Continue Reading

Latest Articles

Best of the Week

 
Send this to a friend