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High School Principal Forced to Apologize for Using ‘Insensitive Language’ on Prom Tickets, Here’s What They Said

This is preposterous.

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We live in an unprecedented time of political correctness, a time when people are so deeply and easily offended that anything you might choose to say — and we do mean anything — could possibly be turned around on you and get you slapped with the label of “bigot” or “racist,” even if that couldn’t be further from the truth.

Just how far down the rabbit hole have we gone, Alice?

Far enough that a principal who wrote “party like it’s 1776” on prom tickets has been forced to apologize for his use of “insensitive language.”

The tickets urged students to “party like it’s 1776” during the event at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

But that prompted complaints from students who noted “not all communities can celebrate what life was like in 1776,” Principal Dennis Perry said in a letter to the community Friday.

“I am writing to apologize for the hurt feelings this reference caused for members of our school family,” wrote Perry.

“I especially apologize to our African American students, who I have let down by not initially recognizing the inappropriateness of this wording,” he added.

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Perry stated that all students attending the event will receive commemorative tickets without the phrase inscribed on them.

How ridiculous is it that a country cannot celebrate it’s own founding because someone somewhere is offended by it? This sort of thing is preposterous on every conceivable level.

Look, we can all agree that slavery was a blight on our nation, a fact that many founders also believed to be true. However, they were limited in their options for being able to persuade people to dump the institution, so many went along with it — which was still wrong — laying the foundation for abolition that came later on.

However, that was 200 years ago. Look at how much better life is for people of all walks of life in America today. It’s time to move on, folks. Time to focus on the future and honor the good that happened in our past.

We must never forget the ugly reality of racism and slavery, but we should allow it to serve as a reminder of why we keep taking steps forward, rather than being a crybaby generation over the usage of a harmless phrase.

Source: Courier Post

 

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