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‘If You’re Black, You’re Not Safe In US Schools’ Says New York University Professor

Just jaw-dropping!!

John Salvatore

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Far too many people with advanced degrees are intentionally dumbing down education for the current generation of students. They think they are doing the right thing.

They are wrong.

And they look stupid.

From The Daily Wire:

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A professor at New York University said that black students are not safe in American schools.

As the one-year anniversary of school closures approaches, New York University (NYU) professor David Kirkland sent out a tweet saying that he was fearful of the nationwide push to reopen schools for in-person learning.

LOOK:

Does it get more irritating than this? How does this bring about unity?

Ridiculous.

Anyway, CNN President Jeff Zucker for mayor of NYC? Anyone? Anyone?

From The Daily Wire:

During an interview with Ben Smith of Buzzfeed News several years ago, CNN President Jeff Zucker entertained the idea of entering politics in the future, albeit without a specific position in mind. But now, over seven years into his tenure as an executive at the news agency, Zucker teased in another interview with Smith that he’s open to running for mayor of New York City.

As The New York Times reports, Smith asked Zucker whether he would consider running for mayor in 2021, when term-limited Democratic mayor Bill de Blasio will be through with his final full year in office.

Zucker said, “New York City is going to need a very strong mayor in the aftermath of this, and I always like a challenge.

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Major Disparity Discovered Between Moderna and Pfizer Vaccines

This could make an enormous difference when it comes to the subject of COVID boosters.

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These days, when you get your polio or tetanus vaccines, you don’t really go shopping around, right?  These two inoculations have been perfected to death, over decades and decades, and really just come with one choice:  Be vaccinated or don’t.

But, in the case of COVID-19 and the swiftly-developed vaccines against it, there are several competing options to choose from, which has created and fomented a hotly-debated choice for many Americans.

Now, new evidence seems to suggest that there is truly a difference in efficacy between the two most popular jabs.

Data collected from 18 states between March and August suggest the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine reduces the risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19 by 91% in the first four months after receiving the second dose. Beyond 120 days, however, that vaccine efficacy drops to 77%.

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Meanwhile, Moderna’s vaccine was 93% effective at reducing the short-term risk of COVID-19 hospitalization and remained 92% effective after 120 days.

Overall, 54% of fully vaccinated Americans have been immunized with the Pfizer shot.

The news could create a major shift in the way country considers the possibly of vaccine booster shots, which has been a confusing and fraught subject over the course of the last several weeks.

One clinical study suggested that the Pfizer boosters could return the efficacy to the 95% range, but the addition of another shot is likely to move the needle on vaccine hesitancy as well, which is a balance that health experts are wary of teetering.

These days, when you get your polio or tetanus vaccines, you don’t really go shopping around, right?  These two inoculations have been perfected to death, over decades and decades, and really just come with one choice:  Be vaccinated or don’t. But, in the case of COVID-19 and the swiftly-developed vaccines against it, there are several competing options to choose from, which has created and fomented a hotly-debated choice for many Americans. Now, new evidence seems to suggest that there is truly a difference in efficacy between the two most popular jabs. Data collected from 18 states between March and August suggest the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine reduces the risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19 by 91% in the first four months after receiving the second dose. Beyond 120 days, however, that vaccine efficacy drops to 77%. Meanwhile, Moderna’s vaccine was 93% effective at reducing the short-term risk of COVID-19 hospitalization and remained 92% effective after 120 days. Overall, 54% of fully vaccinated Americans have been immunized with the Pfizer shot. The news could create a major shift in the way country considers the possibly of vaccine booster shots, which has been a confusing and fraught subject over the course of the last several weeks. One clinical study suggested that the Pfizer boosters could return the efficacy to the 95% range, but the addition of another shot is likely to move the needle on vaccine hesitancy as well, which is a balance that health experts are wary of teetering.

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Texas Doctor Defies Abortion Ban, Setting Up New Legal Challenge to Enforcement

This is just a game of courts and time, and this doctor is betting that with enough of the latter, the former will swing to his favor.

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While the Supreme Court is often seen as a finish line for certain legal challenges here in the United States, in some cases, it is truly only the beginning of another, larger fight.

Such seems to be the case in Texas, where a new abortion ban has already been defied by one doctor.

A Texas doctor claimed Saturday that he has deliberately violated the state’s new abortion law in order to help test whether it’s legal.

Alan Braid, an obstetrician-gynecologist in San Antonio, explained his actions in an essay published in The Washington Post.

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Braid writes that he understands “there could be legal consequences” because of his action.

It seems that “legal consequences” were the whole point.

“But I wanted to make sure that Texas didn’t get away with its bid to prevent this blatantly unconstitutional law from being tested.”

He added later: “I understand that by providing an abortion beyond the new legal limit, I am taking a personal risk, but it’s something I believe in strongly.”

The news comes just days after the Attorney General, Merrick Garland, stated his unequivocal opinion that the new Texas law was unconstitutional – something that very well may have factored into the decision by Braid.

Braid’s case, should Texas choose to enforce the law against him, certainly has the makings of a situation that could again reach the Supreme Court.  Should there be any changes to the makeup of that judicial body ahead of Braid’s case, there could be a reasonable chance that the Texas law gets overturned.

This is why the GOP is so concerned about the Biden administration’s willingness to consider the possibility of packing the court.

While the Supreme Court is often seen as a finish line for certain legal challenges here in the United States, in some cases, it is truly only the beginning of another, larger fight. Such seems to be the case in Texas, where a new abortion ban has already been defied by one doctor. A Texas doctor claimed Saturday that he has deliberately violated the state’s new abortion law in order to help test whether it’s legal. Alan Braid, an obstetrician-gynecologist in San Antonio, explained his actions in an essay published in The Washington Post. Braid writes that he understands “there could be legal consequences” because of his action. It seems that “legal consequences” were the whole point. “But I wanted to make sure that Texas didn’t get away with its bid to prevent this blatantly unconstitutional law from being tested.” He added later: “I understand that by providing an abortion beyond the new legal limit, I am taking a personal risk, but it’s something I believe in strongly.” The news comes just days after the Attorney General, Merrick Garland, stated his unequivocal opinion that the new Texas law was unconstitutional – something that very well may have factored into the decision by Braid. Braid’s case, should Texas choose to enforce the law against him, certainly has the makings of a situation that could again reach the Supreme Court.  Should there be any changes to the makeup of that judicial body ahead of Braid’s case, there could be a reasonable chance that the Texas law gets overturned. This is why the GOP is so concerned about the Biden administration’s willingness to consider the possibility of packing the court.

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