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Jeff Flake Makes Not-So-Subtle Hint at 2020 Trump Mutiny

Is this the sort of nonsense we should except come 2020?

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Jeff Flake

With the election of President Trump in 2016, it certainly feels as though a great many of the longstanding political rules have been tossed out of the window in America.

Of course, a great deal of this unorthodox feeling comes from Donald Trump’s unwillingness to set aside Twitter during his presidency, using the platform to circumnavigate the mainstream media in ways that many networks have yet to find an effective counter for.

Given this brave, new world of political non-conformity, it stands to reason that Trump may not breeze through the 2020 primaries either, especially given the massive RINO contingent that is bubbling just below the right wing’s surface.  Now, Senator Jeff Flake is putting some weight behind this possibility.

Jeff Flake said Friday that a Republican needs to challenge Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination in 2020. And it might be him.

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Flake gave at least some credence to the widespread speculation that he might mount a quixotic primary campaign against Trump, given the retiring senator’s public fretting about the state of the party. The Arizona GOP senator, who has visited New Hampshire recently, is decidedly keeping his name out there.

“I’ve not ruled it out. I’ve not ruled it in. Just, somebody needs to run on the Republican side,” Flake said on Friday in a lengthy conversation with POLITICO and The Hill on Friday. Flake said both outgoing Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Nebraska GOP Sen. Ben Sasse could give Trump a credible challenge.

Flake insisted that Trump’s popularity in the party is ruining the GOP’s long-term viability and predicted only a brutal electoral loss could make that clear.

“I hope somebody does [run], just to remind Republicans what it means to be conservative and what it means to be decent. We’ve got to bring that back,” Flake said. “You can whip up the base for a cycle or two but it wears thin. Anger and resentment are not a governing philosophy.”

Flake and the President have been at odds several times over the course of these first two years of the Trump Era, with the President mentioning the Senator by name at least once this week alone.

 

 

News

‘RUST’ SHOOTING: Alec Baldwin Not Out of The Woods Yet, Says Santa Fe District Attorney

Baldwin has suggested that he won’t be charged, but the local DA has other ideas.

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The story surrounding the shooting death of cinematographer Halya Hutchins continues to grow stranger by the day, and a district attorney in New Mexico just dropped a major bombshell in the direction of Alec Baldwin.

Baldwin was rehearsing for a scene when the firearm he was holding discharged live ammunition, killing Hutchins and injuring others.  The gun somehow had a live round in it, despite there being a number of ethical and legal reasons why this should not have been possible.

To further confuse things, Baldwin has wildly suggested that he never pulled the trigger of the gun – something that experts are going to have to find a way to prove in order to clear Baldwin’s culpability.

Now, a local litigator has suggested that Baldwin should be prepared for the worst.

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On Friday, First Judicial District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies clarified that it is still very possible for Alec Baldwin to be “criminally culpable” in Hutchins’ death depending on what the investigation yields.

“Certain individuals may be criminally culpable for his/her actions and/or inactions on the set of Rust,” Carmack-Altwies told Deadline.

Carmack-Altwies asserted that she will “exercise my prosecutorial discretion to its fullest, including filing charges that are supported by probable cause.”

The possibilities are numerous.

The district attorney further clarified that “everyone” handling firearms on the set of Rust had a duty to follow safety protocols.

“Everyone involved in the handling and use of firearms on the set had a duty to behave in a manner such that the safety of others was protected, and it appears that certain actions and inactions contributed to this outcome,” Carmack-Altwies the attorney said.

During the interview in which Baldwin suggested that he never pulled the trigger, he also insinuated that he’d spoken with the local sheriff’s department, and that there was some sort of understanding between he and them regarding the lack of charges to be brought.

The story surrounding the shooting death of cinematographer Halya Hutchins continues to grow stranger by the day, and a district attorney in New Mexico just dropped a major bombshell in the direction of Alec Baldwin. Baldwin was rehearsing for a scene when the firearm he was holding discharged live ammunition, killing Hutchins and injuring others.  The gun somehow had a live round in it, despite there being a number of ethical and legal reasons why this should not have been possible. To further confuse things, Baldwin has wildly suggested that he never pulled the trigger of the gun – something that experts are going to have to find a way to prove in order to clear Baldwin’s culpability. Now, a local litigator has suggested that Baldwin should be prepared for the worst. On Friday, First Judicial District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies clarified that it is still very possible for Alec Baldwin to be “criminally culpable” in Hutchins’ death depending on what the investigation yields. “Certain individuals may be criminally culpable for his/her actions and/or inactions on the set of Rust,” Carmack-Altwies told Deadline. Carmack-Altwies asserted that she will “exercise my prosecutorial discretion to its fullest, including filing charges that are supported by probable cause.” The possibilities are numerous. The district attorney further clarified that “everyone” handling firearms on the set of Rust had a duty to follow safety protocols. “Everyone involved in the handling and use of firearms on the set had a duty to behave in a manner such that the safety of others was protected, and it appears that certain actions and inactions contributed to this outcome,” Carmack-Altwies the attorney said. During the interview in which Baldwin suggested that he never pulled the trigger, he also insinuated that he’d spoken with the local sheriff’s department, and that there was…

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Opinion

US State Pushes to Make Mask Mandates Permanent

The move is sure to have freedom advocates in the Beaver State enraged. 

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The American landscape is currently littered with a hodgepodge of coronavirus precautions, as each state, country, town, and business takes the COVID-19 pandemic at their own level of seriousness.

This has, of course, made it somewhat difficult for any individual to navigate their day in compliance to the ever-changing rigidity of the pandemic’s threat.  And, furthermore, it has led to some questionable decisions by local leaders looking to simplify the issue.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) assembled a Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) earlier this week to address a permanent indoor mask mandate in the state. Oregon is one of a few states that still retain one nearly two years into the pandemic.

The committee included several community stakeholders, including representatives from the hospitality industry, the business sector, and faith communities, according to local ABC affiliate KATU.

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Local leaders attempted to downplay the “permanent” status of the mandate.

Dr. Paul Cieslak, the medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations with OHA, explained to KATU that OHA’s potential “permanent” indoor mask mandate is not necessarily permanent because it can be repealed.

“Permanent means indefinite. It doesn’t necessarily mean permanent,” Cieslak said. “We can repeal it as well, but we are only allowed to have a temporary rule for 180 days, and anything that goes beyond 180 days, we cannot extend it.”

The move is sure to have freedom advocates in the Beaver State enraged.

The American landscape is currently littered with a hodgepodge of coronavirus precautions, as each state, country, town, and business takes the COVID-19 pandemic at their own level of seriousness. This has, of course, made it somewhat difficult for any individual to navigate their day in compliance to the ever-changing rigidity of the pandemic’s threat.  And, furthermore, it has led to some questionable decisions by local leaders looking to simplify the issue. The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) assembled a Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) earlier this week to address a permanent indoor mask mandate in the state. Oregon is one of a few states that still retain one nearly two years into the pandemic. The committee included several community stakeholders, including representatives from the hospitality industry, the business sector, and faith communities, according to local ABC affiliate KATU. Local leaders attempted to downplay the “permanent” status of the mandate. Dr. Paul Cieslak, the medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations with OHA, explained to KATU that OHA’s potential “permanent” indoor mask mandate is not necessarily permanent because it can be repealed. “Permanent means indefinite. It doesn’t necessarily mean permanent,” Cieslak said. “We can repeal it as well, but we are only allowed to have a temporary rule for 180 days, and anything that goes beyond 180 days, we cannot extend it.” The move is sure to have freedom advocates in the Beaver State enraged.

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