Connect with us

News

Lab Leak Theory Downplayed in Public Despite Private Concerns from Scientists

Who were they protecting?

Published

on

In the very first days of this coronavirus pandemic, China was in the driver’s seat, and that proved to be an unfortunate happenstance for the rest of the world.

The first outbreak, which occurred just miles from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, was largely reported to have occurred after the virus jumped from bats to humans at a local wet market.  But then, as the virus spread overwhelmingly effectively overseas, it became apparent that China had severely downplayed the severity of the issue, leaving the rest of the world to simply be caught off guard.

And then came a great deal of obstinance from Beijing as far as getting a good look at the aforementioned virology institute.  This led to a creeping suspicion about the origins of the pandemic, and the same scientists who were downplaying that theory on television were secretly fearful behind the scenes.

“I really can’t think of a plausible natural scenario where you get from the bat virus … to nCoV where you insert exactly four amino acids 12 nucleotide that all have to be added at the exact same time to gain this function,” Dr. Robert Garry from Tulane’s School of Medicine said, according to notes from a February 2020 meeting released by House Republicans.

“I just can’t figure out how this gets accomplished in nature,” Garry added in his group comments at the time. “Don’t mention a lab origin, as that will just add fuel to the conspiracists.”

But, in response:

“NO one said that – I certainly never believed that. At that time of the teleconference we’d been looking all the options – all were on the table including a lab origin. The simple boring fact is we got new data and our opinions changed – that is the lab origin looked progressively less likely,” Garry told Fox News in an exclusive statement. “The insinuation that we were somehow bought off with a large NIH grant is absurd – that grant was written and peer-reviewed before anyone had heard of SARS-CoV-2.”

And then…

Dr. Kristian Anderson, a prominent virologist at the Scripps lab, told Fauci Jan. 31 2020, that “the genome is inconsistent with expectations from evolutionary theory,” an observation that points to synthetic manufacturing.

After Fauci was already made aware of Anderson’s observations, a conference call with dozens of expert virologists around the world was organized.

Contacted by Fox News, Anderson denied any influence on his perception of the virus, saying that

“No, I do not believe that origin theories were obscured, censored, or suppressed, although the question has become heavily politicized by lab leak proponents,” Anderson told Fox. “Our scientific investigations – published in peer-reviewed scientific journals – have only been driven by scientific enquiry. Any suggestions to the contrary are false.”

China’s apparent coverup of some of the facts surrounding COVID-19’s origins is suspicious at best, and it may behoove the scientific community not to obscure their opinions so thoroughly.

News

Secret Service Shamed After Drunk Agents Assault Cab Driver in South Korea

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations.

Published

on

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it.

For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression.

This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets.

Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident.

The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News.

Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver.

There could be more trouble coming, as well.

In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed.

One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed.

The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives.

“The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.”

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it. For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression. This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets. Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident. The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News. Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver. There could be more trouble coming, as well. In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed. One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed. The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives. “The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.” There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

Continue Reading

News

See No Evil Flags

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

Published

on

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

Continue Reading

Latest Articles

Best of the Week