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Matthew Perry WASTED $9 Million On Rehab

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Matthew Perry, known primarily for playing Chandler in the show Friends, recently released a new memoir, in which he admits that he has probably spent around $9 million dollars on going to rehab 15 times and paying for surgeries needed as a result of his drug use. This admission, along with his descriptions of his near death experiences from heavy opioid use, have been making headlines on a number of major websites. Not one of the writers for any of these sites thought to point out the insanity of spending such an absurd amount of money attending 15 rehabs, at which he almost surely learned the same things. Additionally, not one of these writers questioned why it took 15 trips for him to “recover.”

The article from Vanity Fair closes with a quote from Perry saying that “If you don’t have sobriety, you’re going to lose everything that you put in front of it . . .”1 This is a pretty common saying in the rooms of AA – one of the many designed to keep your entire life revolving around attending meetings and working the steps, or else face “jails, institutions, and death.” As you would expect from someone who has attended rehab 15 times, Perry seems like he’s bought into AA and the disease dogma that we know are both built entirely on harmful falsehoods. Funny enough, in the article he admits that the moment he decided to stop doing drugs came from being presented with the choice of living life with or without a colostomy bag–NOT the steps, NOT a meeting, and NOT working with a sponsor or a higher power. He simply decided that he would be happier abstaining from drug use because of the health issues he experienced as a result of using drugs, and at this point he has maintained that decision.

Almost certainly, he could have avoided spending all that money on so many rehabs and the health problems he experienced had he never gone to any rehab and learned that he was diseased and powerless. Perry learned that drug addiction was a lifetime to battle, and a battle it became for him. Those rehabs stripped him of his agency and ability to clearly assess his relationship to the drug, the very things needed for him to just solve his problem and move on the moment it became a serious problem in his life. As we know, the majority of people who qualify for substance use disorders simply “age out” without treatment over time.2 Likely, had he never encountered these horrible treatment centers and AA-centric recovery lifestyle, he could have resolved his problematic substance on his own much earlier and easier. Sadly, his story is not uncommon – anecdotally, many people I encountered in treatment had been to treatment centers multiple times. Several people I considered my friends are now dead after being sent through the treatment center cycle multiple times. Treatment doesn’t work and only serves to harm people and generate an enormous amount of money for the monolithic multi-billion-dollar treatment industry. The Freedom Model‘s Online Coaching guides through the Freedom Model Online Program and teaches you how to choose what is best for you, and to move on from addiction and recovery forever. For a limited time, we are offering a free coaching class for those looking to see if the Freedom Model is right for you. You can call directly at 1-888-424-2626 and talk with someone to schedule your free class.


Written by Matthew Sparks

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CITATIONS:

Kirkpatrick, Emily. “Matthew Perry Has Spent around $9 Million Trying to Get Sober.” Vanity Fair, 24 Oct. 2022, https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2022/10/matthew-perry-spent-9-million-sober-journey-addiction-rehab-stomach-surgery-oxycontin.

Blanco, Carlos et al. “Probability and predictors of remission from life-time prescription drug use disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.”

Journal of psychiatric research vol. 47,1 (2013): 42-9. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2012.08.019

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