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Media Mocks Texas Lt. Gov for His Comments on School Shootings. Here’s Why He’s Right.

These are the people who want to disarm you.

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Mainstream news outlets and gun control advocates were quick to criticize Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick over his comments that the construction of the school in Santa Fe in which a 17-year-old gunman opened fire on Friday, killing 10, may have worsened the outcome.

What they didn’t understand was that he was actually right–the floorplans and exit and entrance strategies to any given building is the difference between a soft target and a hard target. There’s one problem: these critics simply have so little of an understanding of strategies for tactical defense, they couldn’t even recognize the language he was using.

“From what we know, this student walked in … with a long coat and a shotgun under his coat,” he said Sunday, according to a CNN article oh-so-objectively titled Texas official blames school shooting on too many exits and entrances. “It’s 90 degrees. Had there been one single entrance possibly for every student, maybe he would have been stopped.”

“We need to get down to one or two entrances into our schools,” Patrick said again on Sunday. “You have the necessary exits for fire, of course, but we have to funnel our students into our schools so we can put eyes on them.”

CNN, in their boldfaced and shameless bias turned this into: “Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick blamed Friday’s massacre at a high school near Houston in part on ‘too many entrances and too many exits’ on the campus, prompting some to mock his perspective as ‘”door control.'”

It’s unclear, if anyone other than CNN “mocked” Patrick for this, but they were in good, left-leaning, gun-grabbing company:

https://twitter.com/TomNamako/status/997557776850268162

Dana Loesch on her radio program Monday said those mocking Patrick, however, are nothing more than “tactical keyboard warriors” on Twitter and know nothing of the plain security knowledge Patrick is displaying.

“Dan Patrick was mocked because he talked about something that the people mocking him didn’t understand. They don’t understand what it takes to secure something like a school,” she said. “Dan Patrick was absolutely right.”

She also referenced veteran J.R. Salzman who corrected Patrick’s critics by explaining “he’s talking about secure entrances. My kid’s school only has one entrance to get in and you have to be buzzed in by the front desk. That’s what he’s talking about. Controlling access, establishing a secure perimeter.”

https://twitter.com/jrsalzman/status/997615698334498817

This is very basic security lingo, and yet those who are most adamant about your Second Amendment rights being destroyed are the least knowledgeable in the issues they claim the most to know about: mass shootings, and keeping our children safe.

These are the people who want to disarm you.

 

 

Opinion

Biden Bailed Out by Germany as 78,000 Pounds of Formula Arrives

The administration has been abysmal in addressing the crisis.

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Everywhere we look in America today, something is amiss.  This is not the well-oiled machine of yore, and in such an astounding way that the stagnation could only have come from the top.

And yes, the Biden administration’s reluctance to lead has been a rather apparent issue from the get-go.  (Heck, it didn’t even look like Biden even wanted to run for President, let alone be the President).

Even now, as an astonishing baby formula shortage affects our nation’s parents, it took help from Germany to get anything done.

A military plane carrying enough specialty infant formula for more than half a million baby bottles arrived Sunday in Indianapolis, the first of several flights expected from Europe aimed at relieving a shortage that has sent parents scrambling to find enough to feed their children.

President Joe Biden authorized the use of Air Force planes for the effort, dubbed “Operation Fly Formula,” because no commercial flights were available.

The formula weighed 78,000 pounds (35,380 kilograms), White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters aboard Air Force One as Biden flew from South Korea to Japan.

The administration tried to spin this into a “win”.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was in Indianapolis to greet the arrival of the first shipment.

The flights are intended to provide “some incremental relief in the coming days” as the government works on a more lasting response to the shortage, Brian Deese, director of the White House National Economic Council, said Sunday.

Deese told CNN’s “State of the Union” that Sunday’s flight brought 15% of the specialty medical grade formula needed in the U.S., and because of various actions by the government, people should see “more formula in stores starting as early as this week.”

There is still a good possibility that the American manufacturers who’ve fallen behind won’t be getting back up to speed for several weeks still, which means Germany may be called on for another drop sooner rather than later.

Everywhere we look in America today, something is amiss.  This is not the well-oiled machine of yore, and in such an astounding way that the stagnation could only have come from the top. And yes, the Biden administration’s reluctance to lead has been a rather apparent issue from the get-go.  (Heck, it didn’t even look like Biden even wanted to run for President, let alone be the President). Even now, as an astonishing baby formula shortage affects our nation’s parents, it took help from Germany to get anything done. A military plane carrying enough specialty infant formula for more than half a million baby bottles arrived Sunday in Indianapolis, the first of several flights expected from Europe aimed at relieving a shortage that has sent parents scrambling to find enough to feed their children. President Joe Biden authorized the use of Air Force planes for the effort, dubbed “Operation Fly Formula,” because no commercial flights were available. The formula weighed 78,000 pounds (35,380 kilograms), White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters aboard Air Force One as Biden flew from South Korea to Japan. The administration tried to spin this into a “win”. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was in Indianapolis to greet the arrival of the first shipment. The flights are intended to provide “some incremental relief in the coming days” as the government works on a more lasting response to the shortage, Brian Deese, director of the White House National Economic Council, said Sunday. Deese told CNN’s “State of the Union” that Sunday’s flight brought 15% of the specialty medical grade formula needed in the U.S., and because of various actions by the government, people should see “more formula in stores starting as early as this week.” There is still a good possibility that the American manufacturers who’ve fallen behind won’t be getting…

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Opinion

Trouble Coming as Global Food Shortage Looms Just Weeks Away

Now this is getting a little scary…

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The Russian invasion of Ukraine may look small on television, as it bellows away thousands of miles to our east, shown to us in soundbites and tidbits and tweets.  But for those living within that daily nightmare, the trouble is real and it is heavy.

Soon, however, the world at large will begin to feel the reverberations of this illegal and immoral invasion, as we begin to find ourselves hungrier and hungrier.

A food supply expert warns that the world faces a global crisis in just 10 weeks, echoing a warning from Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.

“Russia has blocked almost all ports and all, so to speak, maritime opportunities to export food – our grain, barley, sunflower and more. A lot of things,” Zelenskyy said Saturday. “There will be a crisis in the world. The second crisis after the energy one, which was provoked by Russia.”

“Now it will create a food crisis if we do not unblock the routes for Ukraine, do not help the countries of Africa, Europe, Asia, which need these food products,” he added.

Just how bad could it get?

Zelenskyy said that if Ukraine does not regain control of the contested southern ports, the world will face a difficult situation: The country produces a substantial amount of the global food supply, including between 25% and 30% of the world’s grain supply along with Russia.

According to data from the Observatory of Economic Complexity, Ukraine also accounts for 9.29% of the world’s corn supply.

One expert had a chilling warning about the issue, labeling it as potentially “seismic”.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine may look small on television, as it bellows away thousands of miles to our east, shown to us in soundbites and tidbits and tweets.  But for those living within that daily nightmare, the trouble is real and it is heavy. Soon, however, the world at large will begin to feel the reverberations of this illegal and immoral invasion, as we begin to find ourselves hungrier and hungrier. A food supply expert warns that the world faces a global crisis in just 10 weeks, echoing a warning from Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. “Russia has blocked almost all ports and all, so to speak, maritime opportunities to export food – our grain, barley, sunflower and more. A lot of things,” Zelenskyy said Saturday. “There will be a crisis in the world. The second crisis after the energy one, which was provoked by Russia.” “Now it will create a food crisis if we do not unblock the routes for Ukraine, do not help the countries of Africa, Europe, Asia, which need these food products,” he added. Just how bad could it get? Zelenskyy said that if Ukraine does not regain control of the contested southern ports, the world will face a difficult situation: The country produces a substantial amount of the global food supply, including between 25% and 30% of the world’s grain supply along with Russia. According to data from the Observatory of Economic Complexity, Ukraine also accounts for 9.29% of the world’s corn supply. One expert had a chilling warning about the issue, labeling it as potentially “seismic”.

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