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Milwaukee Brewers Give Biggest Honor Ever to Broadcaster Bob Uecker

“You can’t ask for a bigger honor.”

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You can’t ask for a bigger honor than the one the Milwaukee Brewers bestowed on long-time broadcaster Bob Uecker.

Clearly the players consider Bob one of their own, but the players did not serve Bob with mere lip service to tell him so. They spoke with their wallets!

Of course, Uecker once played for the Brewers way back in the 1960s. But, if what the team did for Bob last year is any indication, as far as they are concerned, the broadcast legend is still on the roster.

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Uecker caught in the big leagues from 1962-1967, including with the Milwaukee Braves, before returning to town as a broadcaster in 1971. Now 85 years old, Uecker still works as the beloved radio play-by-play man for the Brewers.

And when the Brewers made playoffs last fall, the players voted to give Uecker a full playoff share worth $123,000. Uecker, a man known for his sense of humor, couldn’t help but get choked up when he heard the news.

“To include me in that, I couldn’t believe it,” Uecker said. “I said, ‘I don’t believe it. Really?’ I’ve tried to make sure I thanked every one of them.”

It was apparent how much the Brewers love Uecker when they doused him in champagne after they clinched their first playoff spot in seven years. Uecker told the Journal Sentinel that the players made sure he joined them in the clubhouse to celebrate. Otherwise, the champagne would have made its way up to the broadcast booth.

The team members really love Bob, apparently.

“Bob belongs in a baseball clubhouse. He fits. He gets it. His sense of humor doesn’t have an age span. It plays to all audiences. The guys love having him around,” Brewers manager Craig Counsell said.

It is actually a pretty amazing honor for the team to cut Bob in on the playoffs cash.

Indeed, at his age and net worth, the money is not the thing. It is the honor that the team included him as a worthy member that deserved a cut.

What could b a bigger honor?

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Twitter @warnerthuston.

Sports

‘Transgender’ Weightlifter Set to Destroy Natural-Born Women at Tokyo Olympics

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has foolishly agreed to allow a man claiming to be a woman to enter the weightlifting competition.

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The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has foolishly agreed to allow a man claiming to be a woman to enter the weightlifting competition as a woman, and now that man is set to utterly destroy every natural-born female in the games. New Zealander Laurel Hubbard, 43, was born a man, but is now claiming to be a female weightlifter. And so far, every single competition he’s entered as a woman, he has made the natural-born female contestants look like 90-pound weaklings. And now that Hubbard has been allowed to join the New Zealand team, he is set to destroy every natural-born female contestant who will compete in Tokyo. Hubbard fell to sixth in 2019 after suffering an injury, but he is now fit and ready to go. Hubbard competed as a man for years in New Zealand, but seven years ago began transitioning to a female. Hubbard is now set to compete in the women’s 87-plus kg division in the Australian Open in Canberra on Sunday, NBC reports. The New Zealander won last month’s World Cup in Rome, lifting 270kg to beat Ukraine’s Anastasiia Lysenko by 4kg. Olympics candidates need to complete six events or more in the 18 months before the Olympic tryouts to qualify. Hubbard has qualified to compete as a woman per the newest rules put in place by the International Weightlifting Federation’s guidelines as well as the International Olympic Committee’s rules. Natural-born men who wish to compete as a woman must have testosterone levels are below ten nanomoles per liter for at least a year before their first competition, the IOC says. The IOC’s rules are not without controversy, though. The IOC recently shelved attempts to change its rules, but pulled back when the committee’s own scientists could not agree on standards. Hubbard has been tearing through…

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Opinion

Tokyo Woke No Mo’: IOC Bans BLM Apparel for Olympics

…and it was the players’ idea!

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Over the course of the last several years, Americans have been inundated with the melding of sports and politics, as athletes from around the nation continue to express their political and cultural beliefs while on the job. For many, this has been an annoyance and not an elevation of the game, as Americans continues to complain about their “escape” from the real world now being tainted with a whole lot of drama from the real world. That won’t be the case in Tokyo, however, as the International Olympic Committee looks to put the kibosh on virtue signaling.  Olympics athletes will not be allowed to wear “Black Lives Matter” apparel during ceremonies at the upcoming Tokyo Olympic games, according to new rules posted by the International Olympics Committee (IOC). The IOC revealed its newest policy changes last month, noting that no political demonstrations will be allowed on the field of play. And IOC officials have since confirmed that the rules also ban any use of Black Lives Matter imagery, logos, apparel, slogans, and activism, according to TMZ Sports. The move came after the IOC polled the participating athletes on the subject. The IOC claimed that its prohibitions on athlete activism came after a poll found that a “majority” of the 3,500 athletes polled favored the ban. “A very clear majority of athletes said that they think it’s not appropriate to demonstrate or express their views on the field of play, at the official ceremonies, or at the podium,” said IOC Athletes’ Commission chief Kirsty Coventry. “So our recommendation is to preserve the podium, field of play, and official ceremonies from any kind of protest or demonstrations or acts perceived as such,” Coventry added. Given the high profile nature of the IOC’s stance, it will be interesting to see just how many athletes attempt…

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