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NFL Star J.J. Watt Will Personally Pay for the Funerals of all the Santa Fe High School Victims

I believe it goes without saying:  J.J. Watt is a national treasure.

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I have spent a great deal of time pondering the Supreme Court’s latest decision on sports gambling, wondering in earnest if there is more to it than meets the eye.

For the uninitiated, last week marked a huge victory for freedom advocates with a penchant for gambling, as the Supreme Court virtually opened the door for states to make up their own mind as to whether or not their citizens would like to risk their hard earned cash for the glory of picking the right ponies – figuratively speaking.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of New Jersey on Monday effectively killed the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA), the federal law that essentially limited sports betting to one state for the last 25 years.

PASPA was declared unconstitutional in the 6-3 decision, meaning it will be up to states – including New Jersey, which has sought to establish sports gambling for years – to decide whether to allow its residents to bet on sports.

If we want to assume that there is a bit more to the story, we needn’t look much further than the NFL, which has been plagued by the inexcusable actions of their players, both on and off the field, and has subsequently tanked in ratings and revenue.  This sports-betting green light will certainly bring more Americans back to the NFL, as they can now let their paychecks ride on the punting and passing.

Among all of the unsavory characters within the National Football League, there are a few genuine nice guys still kicking around, including J.J. Watt of the Houston Texans.

Santa Fe High School administrators have been notified that Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt will personally pay for the funerals of all the victims of the shooting. Dimitrios Pagourtzis, 17, a student at the school, was arrested and charged with capital murder and aggravated assault of a peace officer in the shooting in which ten people were killed and ten others were injured.

The gesture is only the latest in a series of philanthropic efforts by Watt, who along with Houston Astros second baseman Jose Altuve, was named the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year in 2017 for his contributions in helping the city of Houston following the devastation of Hurricane Harvey. He had established the Houston Flood Relief Fund on the YouCaring crowdfunding platform which would end up raising $37 million. Those funds were distributed among the Americares, Feeding America, SBP and Save the Children organizations.

I believe it goes without saying:  J.J. Watt is a national treasure.

 

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Secret Service Shamed After Drunk Agents Assault Cab Driver in South Korea

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations.

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You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it.

For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression.

This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets.

Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident.

The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News.

Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver.

There could be more trouble coming, as well.

In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed.

One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed.

The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives.

“The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.”

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it. For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression. This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets. Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident. The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News. Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver. There could be more trouble coming, as well. In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed. One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed. The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives. “The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.” There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

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See No Evil Flags

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

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A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

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