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NYT Publishes Cringeworthy Anti-God Piece for Passover

“Perhaps now is a good time to teach our children to pass over God — to be as unlike him as possible,” the author of the piece claimed.

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Print media, at least what’s left of it these days, has long demanded a sort of reverence that they perhaps hadn’t truly earned.

You see, they’ve equated their antiquated output with “quality”, the same way that folks love saying “they don’t make ’em like they used to” even though this is ostensibly untrue.  Human nature demands that we improve, and constantly, to satisfy our innate urge to create and understand.

And so when the New York Times is given some vaunted status within the media, we have to ask ourselves why, especially as they continue to resort to silly PR stunts meant to conjure controversy from thin air.

The New York Times decided to publish a guest essay heavily criticizing God on Good Friday and the start of Passover.

Shalom Auslander composed a piece insisting that this Passover, we should stop paying attention to God:

“In this time of war and violence, of oppression and suffering, I propose we pass over something else: God,” he began, before claiming God is “hateful,” full of “brutality,” and, if mortal, “would be dragged to the Hague.”

And then:

According to the author, Israel’s ancient enemies were troubling, “But just as troubling — even more so today in light of the brutal slaughter taking place in Ukraine — were the plagues themselves.”

“Egyptians young and old, innocent and guilty, suffered locusts and frogs, hail and darkness, beasts running wild and water becoming blood,” Auslander lamented.

“Surely, I wondered, there were some Egyptians who didn’t whip Jews, who didn’t have anything against Jews at all?” he asked.

The author opined, “God, it seems, paints with a wide brush. He paints with a roller. In Egypt, said our rabbi, he even killed first-born cattle. He killed cows.”

The author then invoked the war in Ukraine to bolster his purposefully-offensive point.

“Perhaps now, as missiles rain down and the dead are discovered in mass graves, is a good time to stop emulating this hateful God,” the guest essayist proposed.

“Perhaps we can stop extolling his brutality. Perhaps now is a good time to teach our children to pass over God — to be as unlike him as possible,” he added.

If this is what the New York Times is willing to publish during Passover and Easter, we can only imagine what sort of sacrilegious drivel will be coming for us near Christmas.

Faith

SCOTUS Rules Against Boston After City Refused to Fly Christian Flag

The decision was seen as a win for Christians everywhere.

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In the United States, we are guaranteed the freedom to practice whichever religion we should choose, and have been since the inception of this great nation.

What we are not guaranteed, however, is freedom from religion.  We are allowed to believe what we wish, but we must also understand that this means we may bear witness to the beliefs of others who are exercising their rights.  Maybe we’ll see a yarmulke at the grocery store, or get stuck in traffic as a baptist megachurch lets out on Sunday.

It also means that all religions must be treated equally – something that the City of Boston is learning the hard way this week.

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that a program of the city of Boston that allows outside groups to fly flags at city hall must permit the flying of flag with a cross that a camp referred to as a “Christian flag.”

The question before the court was whether flying the flag as part of a government program was considered government speech if the flag belonged to a private organization, in this case, Camp Constitution. The Supreme Court ruled that it is not.

The ruling left no room for interpretation.

“We conclude that, on balance, Boston did not make the raising and flying of private groups’ flags a form of government speech,” Justice Stephen Breyer wrote in the court’s opinion, stating that as a result the city improperly violated Camp Constitution’s free speech rights.

And that’s not all:

The court’s opinion pointed to how Boston said their goal is “to accommodate all applicants” looking to hold events in the city’s “public forums,” including City Hall Plaza, and the flag flying application only asked for contact information and a short description of the event being requested.

Breyer noted that the city employee who fields flag applications testified that before Camp Constitution’s application, he had never even asked to see a flag before granting approval or even before they were raised.

“The city’s practice was to approve flag raisings, without exception,,” Breyer wrote.

The news comes as the mainstream media continues to equate the religious right with the lesser opinions they hold of conservatives in general, thereby creating a soft vilification of Christianity in the process.

In the United States, we are guaranteed the freedom to practice whichever religion we should choose, and have been since the inception of this great nation. What we are not guaranteed, however, is freedom from religion.  We are allowed to believe what we wish, but we must also understand that this means we may bear witness to the beliefs of others who are exercising their rights.  Maybe we’ll see a yarmulke at the grocery store, or get stuck in traffic as a baptist megachurch lets out on Sunday. It also means that all religions must be treated equally – something that the City of Boston is learning the hard way this week. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that a program of the city of Boston that allows outside groups to fly flags at city hall must permit the flying of flag with a cross that a camp referred to as a “Christian flag.” The question before the court was whether flying the flag as part of a government program was considered government speech if the flag belonged to a private organization, in this case, Camp Constitution. The Supreme Court ruled that it is not. The ruling left no room for interpretation. “We conclude that, on balance, Boston did not make the raising and flying of private groups’ flags a form of government speech,” Justice Stephen Breyer wrote in the court’s opinion, stating that as a result the city improperly violated Camp Constitution’s free speech rights. And that’s not all: The court’s opinion pointed to how Boston said their goal is “to accommodate all applicants” looking to hold events in the city’s “public forums,” including City Hall Plaza, and the flag flying application only asked for contact information and a short description of the event being requested. Breyer noted that the city employee who…

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Faith

LOOK: Church Sees Vision of Jesus on Floor Ahead of Easter

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Around the world, as Christians gathered to celebrate Easter, there was much talk of Jesus rising from the tomb, and what that symbolizes about the forgiveness of sin in even our modern day.

But, for one church in New York State, the holiday was marked by something truly unique.

A priest in upstate New York believes that his church received a divine message over the weekend in the form of a peculiar marking, which he argues was an image of Jesus, mysteriously appeared on the floor of the building. Father Stepanos Doudoukjian reportedly made the remarkable discovery on Sunday morning just prior to the start of Easter services at St. Peter Armenian Church in the community of Watervliet. Much to the priest’s profound surprise, as he was opening the building to parishioners, he noticed a rather strange water stain had formed on the floor of the lobby and the curious discoloration resembled what he took to be Jesus Christ.

The moment was not lost for the clergyman.

“It was an Easter miracle and an apparition of the Lord,” Doudoukjian declared to a local media outlet, “many of our faithful were awestruck by this as well and made the sign of the cross and thanked God upon entering.” To that end, the priest indicated that the parish decided to burn incense at the location where the marking had appeared as a way of showing their appreciation for the potentially miraculous message. Much like many a mysterious apparition, the uplifting marking subsequently faded away a few hours later, though its impact was seemingly felt throughout the church.

The timing struck a chord as well.

“With all the ugly, evil, war and sickness in the world,” he mused, “perhaps what we need is the face of Jesus to assure us of God’s love.”

Video of the divine visage can be seen below.

Around the world, as Christians gathered to celebrate Easter, there was much talk of Jesus rising from the tomb, and what that symbolizes about the forgiveness of sin in even our modern day. But, for one church in New York State, the holiday was marked by something truly unique. A priest in upstate New York believes that his church received a divine message over the weekend in the form of a peculiar marking, which he argues was an image of Jesus, mysteriously appeared on the floor of the building. Father Stepanos Doudoukjian reportedly made the remarkable discovery on Sunday morning just prior to the start of Easter services at St. Peter Armenian Church in the community of Watervliet. Much to the priest’s profound surprise, as he was opening the building to parishioners, he noticed a rather strange water stain had formed on the floor of the lobby and the curious discoloration resembled what he took to be Jesus Christ. The moment was not lost for the clergyman. “It was an Easter miracle and an apparition of the Lord,” Doudoukjian declared to a local media outlet, “many of our faithful were awestruck by this as well and made the sign of the cross and thanked God upon entering.” To that end, the priest indicated that the parish decided to burn incense at the location where the marking had appeared as a way of showing their appreciation for the potentially miraculous message. Much like many a mysterious apparition, the uplifting marking subsequently faded away a few hours later, though its impact was seemingly felt throughout the church. The timing struck a chord as well. “With all the ugly, evil, war and sickness in the world,” he mused, “perhaps what we need is the face of Jesus to assure us of God’s love.”…

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