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Ohio School To Remove Ten Commandments Plaque On Display For Almost 100 Years After Atheist Group Whines

Oh look. More angry atheists.

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There’s nothing more obnoxious than a group of hypocritical angry atheists who whine and moan about how plaques and monuments with nods to Christianity are forcing religion down their throats, all the while they’re attempting to force their godless worldview down on the public at large.

This is exactly what’s happening in Ohio where a school is removing a plaque featuring the Ten Commandments, which has been on display for almost 100 years, to assuage the tender feelings of an atheist group.

Here’s more from The Daily Wire:

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CBN notes that the complaint from the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) was triggered by a disgruntled parent of a child at Welty Middle School in New Philadelphia. FFRF’s April 12 letter stated that the plaque was a “flagrant violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment,” adding, “The district’s promotion of the Judeo-Christian bible and religion over nonreligion impermissibly turns any non-Christian or non-believing student into an outsider. Schoolchildren already feel significant pressure to conform to their peers. They must not be subjected to similar pressure from their schools, especially on religious questions.”

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As the Times-Reporter noted, New Philadelphia Schools Superintendent David Brand issued a statement explaining why the district complied with the demand for the plaque’s removal and argued that the district simply could not afford to challenge FFRF:

Rather than meeting with the District to begin a dialogue, FFRF sent a letter from its office in Wisconsin and then used the local media to further the issue. Since receiving the letter, the District has gathered more information, listened to interested community members, and reviewed its options. As background, the plaque was a gift from the Class of 1926 to the District in 1927. To the best of its knowledge, the District believes the plaque has been displayed in the District ever since. With over 90 years on display, the plaque is recognized as part of the tradition and history of New Philadelphia City Schools.

While the plaque is a well-established and historic piece of New Philadelphia City Schools history, the laws of the United States are pretty clear regarding the display of the Ten Commandments in a school setting. To preserve the plaque, the District would need to overturn a U.S. Supreme Court decision from 1980. Additionally, the District would need to become the first public school to successfully defend a Ten Commandments display in a school setting.

Despite offers from local law professionals to help the district, the ‘costs’ of defending are substantial. In addition to funding multi-year litigation, the District will divert staff, time, and energy from the District’s true purpose — student learning. Even more troubling, if the District’s case is unsuccessful as all other school cases have been, FFRF can seek for the District to pay FFRF’s legal fees, which have in at least one instance, exceeded $900,000.00. Clearly, challenging the issue legally would be an enormous risk and burden to the local taxpayers.

The District will review the process to donate the plaque to preserve the history of the 92-year-old Ten Commandments plaque. Furthermore, rather than engaging FFRF in an action where the community’s resources are at stake, the District will consider filing an amicus brief in a forthcoming case on the matter. While members of the District do not agree with FFRF’s conduct, the District believes acting on its own terms is the most effective way to oppose FFRF and to continue to serve its students.

Atheists try to pretend they are freethinkers that have no religion, but their adherence the tenets of science and humanism are just as much the practicing of a religion as going to church, reading the Bible, and prayer.

The thing here isn’t that atheists aren’t religious. They are. The problem is they don’t want to admit that they want to see their worldview be the dominant one that everyone believes.

It’s not that they want to eradicate religion. They just want to force their own on the public. Which, ironically, is exactly what they are hating on Christians for doing by having a plaque like this in a school.

It’s absurd. Totally, utterly, absurd.

Nowhere in the Constitution or the writings of the founders does it say that religious beliefs shouldn’t have anything to do with politicals in the public square. The whole separation of church and state is a principle that was designed to prevent the government from picking a particular denomination of Christianity and making it the official church of the country.

If these folks understood history, they’d know this already.

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DA Says Andrew Brown Shooting was ‘Justified’, ‘Tragic’

New video evidence was released on Tuesday to explain the justification.

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Weeks ago, the small town of Elizabeth City, North Carolina was rocked by another police-involved shooting of an unarmed man named Andrew Brown Jr. Police had arrived to execute an arrest warrant on Brown, who had attempted to flee the scene when he was shot by officers.  Lawyers for Brown’s family suggested that the shooting was an “execution”, and demanded that authorities release body cam footage of the killing to the public. Now, the county’s district attorney has stated that, while the incident was certainly “tragic”, the police officers were justified in their use of force. North Carolina District Attorney Andrew Womble said at a press conference on Tuesday that the deputy-involved shooting of Andrew Brown Jr. “while tragic, was justified” – and no law enforcement officers will be criminally charged in the case. Womble, the elected district attorney for Judicial District 1, which covers seven counties of the northeastern part of the state, said that Brown was shot at by three Pasquotank deputies, whose actions were “justified because Brown’s actions caused deputies to reasonably believe it necessary to use force to protect themselves and others.” Womble began playing four body camera videos during the press conference, which was broadcast by several news outlets. Brown ignored deputies’ commands to stop and began to drive his car directly at one of the officers, Womble said. He said the first shot fired at Brown’s car went through the front windshield, not the back as was previously reported. The newly released portion of video was available online, and is graphic in nature. https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1394751010938183684?s=20 There is no telling if the explanation will satisfy police reform protesters, however, and Elizabeth City could see renewed protests in the coming days.

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CDC Mask Guidline Confusion Demonstrated in Latest Polling

Americans just don’t seem to trust the CDC.

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Around the nation, businesses are reopening to full capacity, fans are filling the stadium stands, and bands are announcing their touring plans, thanks to the diminishing perception of a threat stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. This has been a long time coming for Americans, and some carry with them a wee bit of trepidation still about the coming recovery. A new poll shows that many Americans are even having a hard time processing the CDC’s latest mask-guideline adjustment. A significant portion of the public still believes in wearing a mask outside regardless of guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to a recent survey. The survey indicates that forty-two percent of respondents believe everyone in their area should continue to wear a mask regardless of the CDC guidelines. Of the respondents, 39 percent said everyone should follow the CDC guidelines that state masks are only necessary outdoors when in crowds compared to only 19 percent of respondents who actually believe “everyone should do [what] they want regardless of guidelines.” And, somewhat surprisingly: Of those who believe in continuing to wear masks, broken down by party, the results were almost even; 36 percent of Republicans and 37 percent of Democrats want everyone around them to wear masks. Of course, the distrust that Americans naturally have for their government shouldn’t be overlooked either, as their handling of the coronavirus pandemic has spawned a number of protests and lawsuits around the nation.

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