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Crucial Official Nowhere to Be Seen as Biden Attends Tribute for 491 Fallen Officers

Western Journal

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The 40th Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service was a difficult one indeed: 491 fallen officers were honored in front of the U.S. Capitol on Saturday, and the number wasn’t higher than average just because the 39th annual event was canceled due to COVID-19.

Law enforcement deaths in the line of duty in 2020 were up a staggering 96 percent over the year before, according to the National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum, with 264 in 2020 compared to 135 the year before. (Massive riots and lawlessness can have that effect.)

“Being a cop today is one hell of a lot harder than it’s ever been,” Biden said in his speech, according to a White House transcript.

“We expect you to be people ready to stand in the way and take a bullet for us. We expect you to be able to track down the bad guys. We expect you to be the psychologist who talks the couple that are having a violent confrontation together to step back. We expect you to be everything. We expect everything of you.”



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Just don’t expect the nation’s top law enforcement official to be there to honor them.

According to Fox News, Attorney General Merrick Garland wasn’t at the ceremony on Saturday for officers who died in the line of duty in 2019 and 2020, despite FBI Director Christopher Wray and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas attending.

Garland attended a candlelight vigil for fallen officers on Thursday, according to a news release from Customs and Border Protection. Then again, so did Mayorkas, who found time to attend Saturday memorial — and Garland’s absence wasn’t the only thing that likely sounded a wrong note to police, either.

Biden’s speech managed to split duty — and not successfully — between paying tribute to fallen law enforcement heroes and paying lip-service to the president’s legislative agenda, much of it not beloved by the law enforcement community.

See, for example, if you can tell just where the jaws started dropping among the men and women in uniform in attendance during this part of the speech:

“So, under the mournful sound of the bagpipes, we must also hear something else: A call to do better, to do more, to keep you safe, to keep our communities safer,” Biden said.

“For us to step up, to build trust and respect, and heal the breach we now see in so many communities. To recognize that the promise of equal and impartial justice remains a promise but not always a reality for you or others, particularly in low-income communities, too many communities — black and brown.”

Within mere moments, the president transitioned from honoring fallen police officers to a clarion call for social justice on racial and economic fronts. Not even the most deft rhetorical prestidigitator could have pulled that one off, and this is a president who, just a day prior, mispronounced “Nazi” as “nasity” and “transgender” as “chansgender” during a bizarre speech in Connecticut.

Moments later, Biden pitched the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, the Democrats’ police reform plan that would mostly eliminate qualified immunity — the legal doctrine that protects government employees, including police officers, from civil lawsuits if they had reason to believe their actions were legal and justified — and give broad new powers to the federal government to oversee local police.

Biden used the speech to paint his trillion-dollar-plus American Rescue Plan as a funding vehicle for police. He proposed “we invest again in community policing we know works” — even if we don’t necessarily know that it works and that “community policing” is often seen as existing in an either-or dichotomy with enforcing the law.

And speaking of that, there was also some of the coded language of the defund the police movement slipped into the speech, with Biden positing that “we have to stop asking law enforcement officers to do every single job under the sun. ”

“I’m committed to investing in mental health services and mental health professionals who can respond to a mental health crisis alongside you,” Biden said. “You shouldn’t be the one having to talk someone off the edge of the roof. You should have professional help with you. To support our law enforcement officers, it requires that we invest in the systems that provide adequate health care, counseling, drug treatment and prevention, housing, education, and other social services in the community so there is not a discord.”

Cops aren’t stupid. They know the rhetoric of police-defunders involves promising residents moving money from law enforcement to “mental health professionals” and “community services” under the theory that safety won’t be jeopardized.

Biden went on to stump for gun control measures, including so-called “red-flag laws.” In fact, there was just about as much in the speech about Democrat agenda items as there was about fallen police officers. Let not “the mournful sound of the bagpipes” take away from a political opportunity, apparently.

But then, what were we to expect? The administration and the party that undergirds it have been openly hostile to law enforcement since the death of George Floyd turned the left against police with a grotesque vehemence. For the tone-deaf Biden administration, the speech was probably considered a “win,” even though cops and anyone else who was listening had to realize the duplicitous cynicism on display.

It’d naturally be unseemly for the president to skip out on the 40th Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service, particularly after a year of unprecedented death and destruction aimed at police and sheriff’s deputies.

Don’t expect Merrick Garland — the nation’s top law-enforcement officer — to save the date, however. The message that sends to the men and women charged with law enforcement across the country is as clear as Biden’s message was muddied:

You’re on your own.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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Olympic Athlete Reveals Chilling Side Effect of COVID Booster Shot

Western Journal

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Professional athletes fine-tune their bodies in an effort to be the best in the world — but what happens when something goes wrong with a medical procedure?

That’s the unfortunate position Swiss sprinter and Olympian Sarah Atcho found herself in after having a severe reaction to a COVID-19 booster vaccine.

The 26-year-old who competed in the 2016 and 2020 Olympic Games took to social media on Monday to share her experience with the world, giving a matter-of-fact account of a possibly life-changing event.

“Obviously as you know, I’m trying to be as transparent as I can and now is more important than ever,” she began her lengthy post.

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“On December 22 I got my booster vaccination because I didn’t want to struggle with this when the season started. I was told that it was safer to get Pfizer (even though I had Moderna the first time) to avoid cardiac side effects,” she wrote.

A recent study found that Moderna’s vaccine is four times more likely to cause heart inflammation than Pfizer’s. Sweden and Finland have both halted its use.

“On December 27 I felt a tightness in the chest and started feeling dizzy while walking up the stairs,” the young athlete continued.

“This happened a few more times until I decided to check with a cardiologist who diagnosed me with pericarditis (inflammation of the thin membrane surrounding the heart).”

Atcho went on to say she would have to take time off from activities that increased her heart rate.

“I have to admit that I am upset at the situation because we don’t talk enough about the side effects. I feel helpless since this is completely out of my control,” Atcho disclosed.

“I am glad the vaccine helped avoid many deaths and reduce the pressure on the hospitals and hospital staff however I am frustrated that myself as well as other young and healthy people are suffering from these heavy side effects,” she added.

There have been other anecdotal accounts of young athletes experiencing serious side effects such as myocarditis and pericarditis after receiving COVID-19 vaccines, but officials still insist this occurrence is rare.

Of course, it’s hard to tell, since even talking about vaccine side effects or expressing skepticism about the jab is enough to get a person de-platformed.

Dr. Robert Malone, who was instrumental in inventing the mRNA technology used in the COVID-19 vaccines, was thrown off Twitter for expressing his concerns that the vaccines may be doing more harm than good.

Regardless of whether Malone is correct or not, any treatment or procedure should be able to withstand the scrutiny that comes with speaking about its potential side effects.

Perhaps Atcho is a one-in-a-million case — who knows? But the fact that vaccine injury is a subject too taboo to discuss in public raises major red flags.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Professional athletes fine-tune their bodies in an effort to be the best in the world — but what happens when something goes wrong with a medical procedure? That’s the unfortunate position Swiss sprinter and Olympian Sarah Atcho found herself in after having a severe reaction to a COVID-19 booster vaccine. The 26-year-old who competed in the 2016 and 2020 Olympic Games took to social media on Monday to share her experience with the world, giving a matter-of-fact account of a possibly life-changing event. “Obviously as you know, I’m trying to be as transparent as I can and now is more important than ever,” she began her lengthy post. “On December 22 I got my booster vaccination because I didn’t want to struggle with this when the season started. I was told that it was safer to get Pfizer (even though I had Moderna the first time) to avoid cardiac side effects,” she wrote. A recent study found that Moderna’s vaccine is four times more likely to cause heart inflammation than Pfizer’s. Sweden and Finland have both halted its use. “On December 27 I felt a tightness in the chest and started feeling dizzy while walking up the stairs,” the young athlete continued. “This happened a few more times until I decided to check with a cardiologist who diagnosed me with pericarditis (inflammation of the thin membrane surrounding the heart).” Atcho went on to say she would have to take time off from activities that increased her heart rate. “I have to admit that I am upset at the situation because we don’t talk enough about the side effects. I feel helpless since this is completely out of my control,” Atcho disclosed. “I am glad the vaccine helped avoid many deaths and reduce the pressure on the hospitals and hospital staff however I…

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GOP Reps Launch Probe After Solar Company Owned by Biden Megadonor Gets $500 Million Loan from Feds

Western Journal

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The U.S. International Development Finance Corporation is a federal agency providing financing mainly in developing countries for projects involving infrastructure, energy and more.

Last month, DFC loaned $500 million to Arizona-based First Solar to build a plant in India.

A Dec. 7 DFC news release chirped that the agency was “thrilled to be in a position to support First Solar’s new venture in India…vertically integrated photovoltaic solar modular manufacturing…” and the usual blah, blah, blah of a cheerleading news release.

What the news release did not say is that a big stockholder at First Solar is a major donor to the presidential campaign of Joe Biden.

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Lukas Walton, a Walmart heir, gave over $300,000 to the Biden campaign and more than $100,000  to the Democratic National Committee, The Washington Free Beacon reported.

That caught the attention of a pair of Republicans on the House Oversight Committee, Rep. James Comer of Kentucky, ranking member on the committee, and Rep. Ralph Norman of South Carolina, ranking member on the environmental subcommittee.

They want to see DFC records regarding the First Solar loan.

“The loan, which is DFC’s ‘largest single debt financing transaction,’ raises questions about the involvement of political considerations in the analysis and decision-making processes at the DFC,” Comer and Norman said in a letter to the DFC.

The congressmen want records of communications about First Solar between the DFC and the White House. They’re also interested in communications involving billionaire Walton or individuals representing him.

“Given Mr. Walton’s extensive history [of] fundraising for Democrats, this loan raises questions about what role his political contributions may have played in DFC’s decision to grant this loan,” Comer and Norman wrote.

First Solar referred the Free Beacon to the DFC for comment and the DFC declined to respond.

The Congressmen also are interested in a Jan. 7 class-action lawsuit by shareholders claiming First Solar executives put out misleading information and inflated its stock price.

In that suit, the pension fund of Pontiac, Michigan, employees claimed that a First Solar solar module was “grossly underperforming and was unable to hit its wattage targets.”

Those claims inappropriately boosted 2019 stock prices and caused investors to lose money, the Free Beacon said.

In 2020, First Solar settled for $350 million with two U.K. pension fund stockholders who filed suit claiming First Solar’s misleading financial statements had inflated stock prices between 2008 and 2012.

The DFC was known before 2019 as the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, which had a “history of deals gone bad when mixing taxpayer dollars with politically connected entities like First Solar,” Tom Anderson, director of the Government Integrity Project at the National Legal and Policy Center told the Free Beacon.

“This agency has a history of favoring entities backed by huge political contributors, like First Solar, by giving them less scrutiny while prioritizing politically connected projects above entities and individuals who are not politically active,” Anderson said.

But a DFC spokesperson, whom the Free Beacon said asked not to be named, said the December deal had “absolutely nothing to do with politics.”

This is not the first time First Solar has been scrutinized by Republican House Oversight Committee members. They examined it in 2012, while reviewing Obama administration federal loans to solar companies that included the bankruptcy of politically-connected Solyndra and its default on a $500 million federal loan.

During the Obama administration there were $3 billion in loan guarantees to First Solar despite the company not being qualified to receive them, Republican members of Congress at the time said.

While known as OPIC, the agency in 2010 facilitated a $10 million loan to a donor of then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Instead of using the money for a Haiti relief program, the donor kept it, later being sent to prison for fraud, according to the Free Beacon.

The current DFC loan was part of the Biden administration’s “Build Back Better World” program.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

The U.S. International Development Finance Corporation is a federal agency providing financing mainly in developing countries for projects involving infrastructure, energy and more. Last month, DFC loaned $500 million to Arizona-based First Solar to build a plant in India. A Dec. 7 DFC news release chirped that the agency was “thrilled to be in a position to support First Solar’s new venture in India…vertically integrated photovoltaic solar modular manufacturing…” and the usual blah, blah, blah of a cheerleading news release. What the news release did not say is that a big stockholder at First Solar is a major donor to the presidential campaign of Joe Biden. Lukas Walton, a Walmart heir, gave over $300,000 to the Biden campaign and more than $100,000  to the Democratic National Committee, The Washington Free Beacon reported. That caught the attention of a pair of Republicans on the House Oversight Committee, Rep. James Comer of Kentucky, ranking member on the committee, and Rep. Ralph Norman of South Carolina, ranking member on the environmental subcommittee. They want to see DFC records regarding the First Solar loan. “The loan, which is DFC’s ‘largest single debt financing transaction,’ raises questions about the involvement of political considerations in the analysis and decision-making processes at the DFC,” Comer and Norman said in a letter to the DFC. The congressmen want records of communications about First Solar between the DFC and the White House. They’re also interested in communications involving billionaire Walton or individuals representing him. “Given Mr. Walton’s extensive history [of] fundraising for Democrats, this loan raises questions about what role his political contributions may have played in DFC’s decision to grant this loan,” Comer and Norman wrote. First Solar referred the Free Beacon to the DFC for comment and the DFC declined to respond. The Congressmen also are interested…

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