Connect with us

Wire

Op-Ed: Companies Should Abandon College Degree Requirements if They Really Want to Increase Diversity

Western Journal

Published

on

While most parents were practically filling out their children’s college applications, my mom was trying to convince me that I didn’t need a fancy degree to start earning money.

“You want to be a writer — just start writing!” she would tell me. As a teenager, her advice only made my desire to attend college grow stronger. Much to my great disappointment, I can now say she was absolutely right.

There are things I love about college: The people I’ve met and the places it’s taken me around the world. But in terms of educational outcomes, I gained more knowledge in the first week of my internship than from the last four years of classes.

In my experience, college is no longer about passing tests, engaging in discourse, or even learning about a subject area. College is about regurgitating what professors want to hear and rubbing elbows with an elitist society of well-connected people who can offer you a job that you aren’t qualified for.

take our poll - story continues below

Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?

  • Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

If I did it all over again, I probably would have skipped the whole thing and saved $200,000.

Of course, there are some technical careers that do require higher education. I probably wouldn’t allow a self-taught doctor to operate on me, and I wouldn’t drive over a bridge built by a self-taught engineer. But I can confidently say I would hire a self-taught, independent journalist over one who has been corrupted by a homogenous batch of like-minded academics.

Businesses removing the requirement of a college degree would not only increase the diversity of the workforce but also attract free-thinking individuals who have talent and character, all while undercutting the overvalued and overpriced nature of those degrees.

It’s not the color of a person’s skin but the school on their degree that remains the most artificial barrier keeping them from entering the workforce.

Prior to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many companies had a history of discriminating against women and people of color. After Title VII was enacted, society demanded that those companies reverse their discriminatory practices. The way many organizations decided to treat discrimination was by implementing diversity initiatives and imposing racial quotas in hiring practices.

According to a report by Bloomberg last year, an increasing number of companies have adopted workforce quotas. Wells Fargo announced it would “increase black leadership” to 12 percent, Ralph Lauren pledged that 20 percent of its “global leaders” would be people of color, and Delta Airlines said it will double its percentage of black “officers and directors” by 2025.

Implementing racial quotas, however, fails to account for individuals who have faced adversity due to their financial circumstances. A Harvard graduate certainly has not faced the same challenges as a kid who grew up on the South Side of Chicago.

In a system that screens only for race, wealthy people of color will inevitably fill the spots, while individuals with fewer resources remain on the outside. Eliminating the necessity of college degrees would allow people who did not have the financial ability to afford school to enter the workforce.

According to a 2018 article in the Harvard Business Review, “Black men and women still represent a very low percentage of the professional white-collar workforce (less than 8%), given their overall representation in the population.”

The driving factor behind the underrepresentation of black Americans is seen in college graduation statistics. Among workers over age 25, Census Bureau data from 2019 show that while 40 percent of white adults hold at least a bachelor’s degree, only 26 percent of black adults have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

If corporations hope to promote diversity and equal opportunity, they should work less on creating artificial racial compositions and turn focus to eliminating the barriers that keep people from employment.

Additionally, those without college degrees often have the skills and work ethic needed for higher-paying jobs, yet the positions are typically filled with those carrying collegiate pedigrees.

According to a report by the nonprofit [email protected], as many as 30 million U.S. workers without college diplomas have the skills necessary to earn 70 percent more. The report argues that employer education requirements are keeping these workers from attaining jobs they are qualified for.

Those who do not attend college have many other ways to gain skills through alternative routes. Some might enroll in tech bootcamps or community college programs. Others complete free workforce training, on-the-job skills building and military service. In this digital age, people can even use YouTube as a resource for education.

In the business world, nothing matters more than work ethic. According to Forbes, a growth mindset, continuous learning, survival skills and resilience are among the top skills recruiters are looking for in 2021.

The assumption that college graduates are more equipped in these areas simply does not hold up. My own observation is that college radicalizes students, leads them to shut down ideas that challenge their thinking and breeds mechanical memorizers. Those who carve their own path in life tend to take more responsibility for themselves and respect learning from others.

Finally, requiring a college education drives up the value of undergraduate degrees, which most students already agree are not worth the money or time.

Inside Higher Ed examined surveys that evaluated students’ college experiences post-pandemic. Roughly two-thirds agreed with the statement that “higher education is not worth the cost to students anymore.”

The burnout I’ve seen is astonishing. Students turn their cameras off and sleep through Zoom class. Those who go in person watch Netflix on their computers. Some professors are so desperate to engage students that they ask them to write daily reports on anything they learned. I don’t blame them.

With the average price of college sitting at $35,720 per year, students practically sell their souls for a degree. On average, it takes a student close to 20 years to pay off their loan debt. For some graduates, it can take more than 45 years. Those numbers don’t even take into consideration the other costs associated with college — everything from textbooks to housing.

The need for college is changing, and it’s time for companies to catch up with the times.

Corporations like Costco, Home Depot and Google have already rejected considering college degrees while screening candidates for employment opportunities. If more companies want to increase diversity, attract better talent and reject a system that drains millions of bank accounts, then it’s time for them to follow in their footsteps.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Wire

Stranger Saves Teen Hit by Car, Then Disappears After Rescue

Western Journal

Published

on

Lily Irigoyen, 14, from Escondido, California, was headed to Westfield North County Mall with a friend to do some shopping on May 23 when Irigoyen’s life was turned upside down.

As she was crossing a street — using a crosswalk — a driver failed to stop at a stop sign and hit the teenager. She immediately blacked out.

Two other drivers saw what had happened and raced to help. Police later said that a female good Samaritan called 911 and contacted Irigoyen’s family using her cell phone, and a man performed CPR on the teen’s lifeless body — an act that would later turn out to have made all the difference.

The girl’s mother, Isabel Torres, remembers getting the call that broke her heart.



take our poll - story continues below

Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?

  • Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

“Her dad called me that she was in an accident and she was airlifted to the hospital,” she told KNSD.

Irigoyen had suffered a long list of serious injuries, including a damaged kidney, a broken arm, a broken leg, a broken hip and a punctured lung. Worst of all, she had also suffered a brain injury.

For three weeks, the teen was in a coma. Even after coming out of it, she had to stay at the hospital for six months, recovering. She finally made it home in August, and her mom has hope that she will recover.

“We’re getting there,” Torres told KNSD. “With time, I think she’s going to get better and better.”

Police later said that, while the driver who hit the teen was determined to be at fault, no criminal charges were made.

After a recent checkup, Irigoyen has a new goal: To find and thank the good Samaritan who saved her life.

“The doctor told her that everything that happened and she mentioned that, thanks to the person that assisted at the accident with the CPR, she always had air to her brain and for that main reason, they saved her life,” Torres explained.

“I just like felt, like happy, just the fact that someone had that kindness in their heart to help me was nice,” Irigoyen added. “I just want to say how grateful I am … that they helped me and that I’m alive now because of them.”



The man is believed to be a dental surgeon, according to KGTV, though he has not yet been identified or stepped forward.

“I think they’re angels,” a teary Torres told KGTV. “God put them there for a reason … I think it’s a great time to find them, and tell them what a great thing they did … What they did was just amazing.”

“They saved me!” said Irigoyen. “They’re the reason I’m here right now … I would just hug them. No words to express how thankful I am.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Lily Irigoyen, 14, from Escondido, California, was headed to Westfield North County Mall with a friend to do some shopping on May 23 when Irigoyen’s life was turned upside down. As she was crossing a street — using a crosswalk — a driver failed to stop at a stop sign and hit the teenager. She immediately blacked out. Two other drivers saw what had happened and raced to help. Police later said that a female good Samaritan called 911 and contacted Irigoyen’s family using her cell phone, and a man performed CPR on the teen’s lifeless body — an act that would later turn out to have made all the difference. The girl’s mother, Isabel Torres, remembers getting the call that broke her heart. “Her dad called me that she was in an accident and she was airlifted to the hospital,” she told KNSD. Irigoyen had suffered a long list of serious injuries, including a damaged kidney, a broken arm, a broken leg, a broken hip and a punctured lung. Worst of all, she had also suffered a brain injury. For three weeks, the teen was in a coma. Even after coming out of it, she had to stay at the hospital for six months, recovering. She finally made it home in August, and her mom has hope that she will recover. “We’re getting there,” Torres told KNSD. “With time, I think she’s going to get better and better.” Police later said that, while the driver who hit the teen was determined to be at fault, no criminal charges were made. After a recent checkup, Irigoyen has a new goal: To find and thank the good Samaritan who saved her life. “The doctor told her that everything that happened and she mentioned that, thanks to the person that…

Continue Reading

Wire

Brian Laundrie’s Parents Flee Florida Home as ‘For Sale’ Sign Appears Outside

Western Journal

Published

on

Brian Laundrie’s parents may be looking for a new place to live after weeks of scrutiny on the couple.

Their North Port, Florida, home now has a “For Sale by Owner” sign in the front yard, according to the New York Post.

The house became the site of a media circus, with outlets looking for answers in the death of Laundrie’s fiancee Gabby Petito and the whereabouts of Laundrie himself.

Petito’s remains were found at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Laundrie was found dead at the Carlton Reserve in Sarasota County, Florida in October.

take our poll - story continues below

Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?

  • Who would you vote for if the elections were held today?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Laundrie’s lawyer announced that he had died by suicide, with a gunshot wound to the head.

As for Chris and Roberta Laundrie, rumors ran rampant that they knew the whereabouts of their son, who was the sole murder suspect in Petito’s death.

The Post reported that neighbors took advantage of the Laundrie couple having the spotlight, with some even renting their front yards to media outlets for up to $3,500 a week in order to pester the pair around the clock.

No charges have been filed against the parents, but their “lack of cooperation” at times during the investigation may have created unnecessary obstacles, according to a North Port police spokesman last month.

According to WNBC-TV, authorities mistook Roberta Laundrie for her son as she drove his Mustang home at the beginning of the manhunt, a move viewed as part of the parents’ resistance to complying fully with investigators early on.

“Other than confusion, it likely changed nothing. We just wanted people to better understand why we thought we knew Brian was in his home,” North Port Police spokesman Josh Taylor said Oct. 29, the outlet reported.

The family’s attorney, Steve Bertolino, has remained firm that his clients fully complied with the investigation, but was talking with law enforcement in November, WFLA-TV reported.

Still, there is no indication as of now that the parents will have charges against them.

If the couple decides to leave their home, they might want to consider changing their names and buying fake mustaches to protect their identity.

Based on the attitude of their current neighbors, it would not be surprising if they were met with hostility wherever they choose to move.

For now, the toughest task will be finding a new owner for the property, which has now become a symbol for one of the most highly followed crime stories of the century.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Brian Laundrie’s parents may be looking for a new place to live after weeks of scrutiny on the couple. Their North Port, Florida, home now has a “For Sale by Owner” sign in the front yard, according to the New York Post. The house became the site of a media circus, with outlets looking for answers in the death of Laundrie’s fiancee Gabby Petito and the whereabouts of Laundrie himself. Petito’s remains were found at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Laundrie was found dead at the Carlton Reserve in Sarasota County, Florida in October. Laundrie’s lawyer announced that he had died by suicide, with a gunshot wound to the head. As for Chris and Roberta Laundrie, rumors ran rampant that they knew the whereabouts of their son, who was the sole murder suspect in Petito’s death. The Post reported that neighbors took advantage of the Laundrie couple having the spotlight, with some even renting their front yards to media outlets for up to $3,500 a week in order to pester the pair around the clock. No charges have been filed against the parents, but their “lack of cooperation” at times during the investigation may have created unnecessary obstacles, according to a North Port police spokesman last month. According to WNBC-TV, authorities mistook Roberta Laundrie for her son as she drove his Mustang home at the beginning of the manhunt, a move viewed as part of the parents’ resistance to complying fully with investigators early on. “Other than confusion, it likely changed nothing. We just wanted people to better understand why we thought we knew Brian was in his home,” North Port Police spokesman Josh Taylor said Oct. 29, the outlet reported. The family’s attorney, Steve Bertolino, has remained firm that his clients fully complied with the investigation, but was…

Continue Reading
The Schaftlein Report

Latest Articles

Best of the Week