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Paging Fox Mulder: Pentagon Could Open Permanent UFO Office in Coming Months

In yet another case of life imitating art, it appears as though we’re about to have out own government funded X-Files office.

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The truth is out there, and the Pentagon is ready to commit to searching for it full-time.

Over the course of the last several years, Americans have heard more from their government on the subject of UFO’s than ever before.  This is thanks to a number of well-documented sightings from within the military, and a massive glut of disclosure that was forced out of the CIA through an amendment to a COVID-19 relief bill.

Now, amid this rise in interest, the Pentagon is getting serious about the subject.

Tucked into the House of Representatives’ lengthy fiscal 2022 National Defense Authorization Act proposal lawmakers passed Thursday evening is a provision to form a permanent office under the Defense secretary, where officials would investigate government- and military-provided reports of unexplained sights in the sky.

That office would “carry out, on a department-wide basis, the mission currently performed by the Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force,” according to a less-than-five-page section in the House’s NDAA, which was put forth by Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz., a Marine Corps combat veteran.

The office would work to standardize the way in which the DOD documents the phenomenon.

Specifically, officials within that hub would develop a means to synchronize and standardize the collection and analysis of such incidents across federal departments, search for links between these occurrences and foreign governments, evaluate how much of a threat the sightings pose, work with U.S. allies to assess the origins of UAPs and more, the text notes. Starting Dec. 31, 2022 and annually through 2026, the Defense secretary would be required to supply multiple Congressional committees with reports on such phenomenon. Among other topics, those materials would need to include analyses of relevant data collected through geospatial, signals and human intelligence, details of any notable patterns in sightings, and evaluations of health-related effects on people who encountered UAPs. Many of these recommendations were alluded to in that preliminary document from the task force.

In yet another case of life imitating art, it appears as though we’re about to have out own government funded X-Files office.

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Secret Service Shamed After Drunk Agents Assault Cab Driver in South Korea

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations.

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You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it.

For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression.

This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets.

Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident.

The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News.

Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver.

There could be more trouble coming, as well.

In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed.

One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed.

The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives.

“The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.”

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it. For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression. This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets. Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident. The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News. Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver. There could be more trouble coming, as well. In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed. One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed. The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives. “The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.” There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

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See No Evil Flags

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

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A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

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