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Parents Outraged After Black Principal Segregates Students Based on Race: Report

Western Journal

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Judging people by the content of their character instead of the color of their skin is too simple to the progressive left these days.

We’ve seen this mindset exemplified in critical race theory, which teaches students that the past determines their future and that they are born with an inherent potential (or lack of potential) for success on the basis of skin color.

It’s a fatalistic and unfair take on the world that encourages racial minorities to believe they are somehow inherently less qualified than and suppressed by their white counterparts.

It’s a segregating mentality that says it’s okay to draw distinctions between people based on something outside of their control — even if it means reviving an unfair practice outlawed over half a century ago.

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On that note, a shocking story came out of Georgia earlier this week, proving these reinvigorated racial divisions have gone way too far.

Principal Sharyn Briscoe is taking heat from parents for allegedly racially segregating students at Mary Lin Elementary School in Atlanta.

“We’ve lost sleep trying to figure out, like, why would a person do this,” parent Kila Posey told WSB-TV.

Posey who, according to the Atlanta Black Star, is vice president of operations for the parent-teacher association, described her disgust with the policy that began last year.

“First, it was just disbelief that I was having this conversation in 2020 with a person that looks just like me — a black woman,” she said. “It’s segregating classrooms. You cannot segregate classrooms. You can’t do it.”

The move meant black students were placed in two separate classrooms with two separate teachers, Posey said.

White students, however, were placed in six classrooms with six different teachers, according to the parent.

Posey said she discovered the unfair practice when she asked Briscoe if her daughter could be placed in a classroom with an instructor she preferred.

The response? That wouldn’t work.

“She said that’s not one of the black classes, and I immediately said, ‘What does that mean?’ I was confused. I asked for more clarification. I was like, ‘We have those in the school?’ And she proceeded to say that, ‘Yes. I have decided that I’m going to place all of the black students in two classes,’” Posey elaborated.

The mother then pressed Briscoe to integrate her daughter with the white students, to which Briscoe allegedly replied that her child would be isolated from the group.

“I explained to her she shouldn’t be isolated or punished because I’m unwilling to go along with your illegal and unethical practice,” Posey said.

A call to the assistant principal confirmed that Briscoe was responsible for the decision to segregate students. Posey responded by filing a discrimination complaint with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.

The development begs us to ask — is this what constitutes progressive to the American left?

It’s safe to say that implementing a Jim Crow-era policy is exactly the opposite — regressive, if you will.

As mystifying as it is to witness such a flawed practice coming back into play, should we really be shocked?

Some aspects of the past are unthinkable to us now — slavery and segregation rank among them.

I don’t like imagining a future in which racial tensions have flared to such insurmountable heights that we revert to placing people in boxes and labeling them according to society’s interpretations.

I’d like to think my children will come of age in the same learning environment that I did — where children of all races, cultural backgrounds, religions, etc. can come together to view their differences as unique instead of adversarial to each other.

Though this particular racist display came from an unlikely source, it’s a prime example of where the dogma behind CRT can lead.

If we portray the system — any system — as inherently oppressive while voting more authority unto that system, we’ve lost at our own game.

It’s time to decentralize authority as we’ve always stressed, to place people’s destinies in their own hands instead of leaving them subject to what the system does.

I have faith that we are more alike than different — regardless of what partitioners think.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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High School Football Teams Defy Orders and Lead Fans in Stirring Postgame Prayer

Western Journal

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Last week, school officials in Putnam County, Tennessee, were told that district employees were not allowed to lead students in prayer. That included not only teachers and staff but also coaches of athletic teams.

According to WZTV-TV in Nashville, Americans United for Separation of Church and State complained about “several instances of prayer and proselytizing at events at Cookeville and Upperman high schools,” both of which are in the Putnam Country School District.

Administrators from the school district contacted the schools’ attorney, who informed them that the law about cases such as this one is clear.

“Courts have consistently ruled that prayer and proselytizing can not be sponsored by schools or school personnel,” the attorney said.

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In a statement to WZTV, the district further explained its position on the matter.

“As a district, we absolutely understand the importance of prayer in the lives of our students, faculty, and staff members,” it said. “We support the right of students to participate in and lead spontaneous prayers. That right is and will continue to be protected.

“We also understand that faculty and staff members can not lead or participate in the spontaneous student-led prayers.”

Some parents were irked by the decision, which they saw as a religious attack. Dustin Whitefield was one of them, and he and other parents decided to show support at Upperman’s football game against Stone Memorial High School on Friday.

Should coaches be allowed to lead athletes in prayer?

“We do realize this is a public school, but it has always been optional for players to pray, and has been a voluntary event,” Whitefield wrote to WZTV. “Players that still want to pray will have to do it on their own.

“After the game, players and cheerleaders that choose to will be on the field praying on their own. A group of parents will be going out on the field to support them. We will join hands and encircle them from a distance as a sign of protection and solidarity in choosing to continue to pray.

“This is a parent led event! We are encouraging anyone that would like to show their support to please join us.”

Upperman marched to a 27-9 victory in the game Friday night. But it was the postgame festivities that ended up making headlines.

Local resident Bob Vick shared a photo on Facebook showing Upperman and Stone Memorial players leading fans in prayer on the field.

“Satan’s power was defeated tonight, as the threat of a legal action to forbid prayer after the game was overwhelmed by player lead prayer supported by parents and fans in solidarity on Overall Field,” he wrote.

Other social media users shared their own support on Twitter for the students.

Even if the law prohibits teachers or coaches from leading prayer, the players do not look like they will back down anytime soon.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Last week, school officials in Putnam County, Tennessee, were told that district employees were not allowed to lead students in prayer. That included not only teachers and staff but also coaches of athletic teams. According to WZTV-TV in Nashville, Americans United for Separation of Church and State complained about “several instances of prayer and proselytizing at events at Cookeville and Upperman high schools,” both of which are in the Putnam Country School District. Administrators from the school district contacted the schools’ attorney, who informed them that the law about cases such as this one is clear. “Courts have consistently ruled that prayer and proselytizing can not be sponsored by schools or school personnel,” the attorney said. In a statement to WZTV, the district further explained its position on the matter. “As a district, we absolutely understand the importance of prayer in the lives of our students, faculty, and staff members,” it said. “We support the right of students to participate in and lead spontaneous prayers. That right is and will continue to be protected. “We also understand that faculty and staff members can not lead or participate in the spontaneous student-led prayers.” A great WIN for C-S Separation! “This came in response to a letter from @americansunited who wrote to PCS that there were several instances of prayer and proselytizing at events at Cookeville and Upperman high schools.” 👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾https://t.co/qdrv97MoF6 — Americans United (@americansunited) September 18, 2021 Some parents were irked by the decision, which they saw as a religious attack. Dustin Whitefield was one of them, and he and other parents decided to show support at Upperman’s football game against Stone Memorial High School on Friday.

Should coaches be allowed to lead athletes in prayer?
“We do realize this is a public school, but it has always been optional for players to pray, and has been a voluntary event,”…

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Alabama Hospital Defies Biden, Ends COVID Vaccine Requirement for Staff

Western Journal

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Bowing to the threat of legal action against it, one Alabama hospital has rescinded its requirement that all staff be vaccinated against the coronavirus.

UAB Hospital in Birmingham said it will wait to learn how the federal vaccine mandates announced by President Joe Biden play out before imposing any requirement, according to WBRC-TV.

Last week, the Alabama Center for Law and Liberty said the hospital was violating state law, according to Al.com.

The letter said the state’s ban on vaccine passports means government entities cannot require anyone to disclose vaccine information.

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“As the Supreme Court of Alabama has recognized, UAB Hospital is a state-run hospital,” the letter said.

“Consequently, UAB Hospital may not require its employees to disclose whether they have been vaccinated or not. Likewise, the Alabama Attorney General has examined the law and concluded that ‘no government, school, or business in Alabama may demand that a constituent, or customer, respectively, be vaccinated for COVID-19 or show proof of his or her vaccination for COVID-19,'” the letter said.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall also questioned the legality of the Biden administration mandate, saying he had received complaints about privacy violations, according to the Alabama Political Reporter.

“The Attorney General’s Office has received complaints from healthcare employees who believe their COVID-19 immunization status was obtained by their employers through the ImmPRINT registry for the purpose of verifying compliance with the employer’s immunization requirement,” Marshall said, referring to a statewide immunization database.

Should all vaccine mandates be overturned?

“In several of those cases, a shared employer specifically acknowledged accessing the state immunization database for this purpose. This privacy violation is unlawful,” he said.

Marshall said other health care providers should also take note and not be asking employees about their immunization status.

He has said that when the vaccine mandate takes place, Alabama will file a lawsuit against it, according to Al.com.

“The vaccine mandate is unprecedented in its audacity and unlawful in its application,” Marshall said. “The Biden administration knows this full well. The State of Alabama will not allow such an authoritarian power grab to go unchecked.”

Dr. Don Williamson, president of the Alabama Hospital Association, said voluntary efforts have produced vaccination rates of 50 percent to 80 percent depending upon the facility.

“It’s not a small issue if we have unvaccinated employees,” Williamson said. “Hospitals have successfully navigated the waters of getting people vaccinated and for the most part, they have been able to do it without mandates.”

The UAB Hospital in Birmingham issued a statement explaining why a mandate imposed one month was scrapped the next.

“The UAB Health System’s policy requiring COVID vaccines for its workers was implemented in August prior to the announcement of forthcoming federal directives,” it said.

“President Biden issued an executive order Sept. 9 indicating that federal rules and regulations will be issued in the coming weeks that will require COVID vaccines for workers at health care facilities that receive Medicare or Medicaid dollars.

“Because UAB Health System must follow federal law, UAB Health System will remove its vaccine policy at this time. UAB Health System will wait for the detailed federal guidance to develop a replacement vaccine policy in order to ensure full compliance with federal law.”

The statement noted that a voluntary incentive that rewards employees who get vaccinated with $400 remains in place.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Bowing to the threat of legal action against it, one Alabama hospital has rescinded its requirement that all staff be vaccinated against the coronavirus. UAB Hospital in Birmingham said it will wait to learn how the federal vaccine mandates announced by President Joe Biden play out before imposing any requirement, according to WBRC-TV. Last week, the Alabama Center for Law and Liberty said the hospital was violating state law, according to Al.com. The letter said the state’s ban on vaccine passports means government entities cannot require anyone to disclose vaccine information. “As the Supreme Court of Alabama has recognized, UAB Hospital is a state-run hospital,” the letter said. “Consequently, UAB Hospital may not require its employees to disclose whether they have been vaccinated or not. Likewise, the Alabama Attorney General has examined the law and concluded that ‘no government, school, or business in Alabama may demand that a constituent, or customer, respectively, be vaccinated for COVID-19 or show proof of his or her vaccination for COVID-19,'” the letter said. Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall also questioned the legality of the Biden administration mandate, saying he had received complaints about privacy violations, according to the Alabama Political Reporter. “The Attorney General’s Office has received complaints from healthcare employees who believe their COVID-19 immunization status was obtained by their employers through the ImmPRINT registry for the purpose of verifying compliance with the employer’s immunization requirement,” Marshall said, referring to a statewide immunization database.

Should all vaccine mandates be overturned?
“In several of those cases, a shared employer specifically acknowledged accessing the state immunization database for this purpose. This privacy violation is unlawful,” he said. Marshall said other health care providers should also take note and not be asking employees about their immunization status. He has said that when the vaccine mandate takes place, Alabama will file a lawsuit…

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