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Pro-Gun Parkland Shooting Survivor Has Harvard Admission Rescinded, & His Story Is Heartbreaking

Oh, come on!!

John Salvatore

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Kyle Kashuv and David Hogg both survived the massacre at Parkland, Florida’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The former is pro-gun while the latter is anti-gun.

Both teenagers were accepted into Harvard University.

On Monday, the pro-gun Kashuv revealed that he got kicked out of the Ivy League school before he ever had the chance to officially attend.

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Here’s why…

1/ THREAD: Harvard rescinded my acceptance.

Three months after being admitted to Harvard Class of 2023, Harvard has decided to rescind my admission over texts and comments made nearly two years ago, months prior to the shooting.

I have some thoughts. Here’s what happened.

2/ A few weeks ago, I was made aware of egregious and callous comments classmates and I made privately years ago – when I was 16 years old, months before the shooting – in an attempt to be as extreme and shocking as possible.

I immediately apologized.

Here is my apology:

3/ After I issued this apology, speculative articles were written, my peers used the opportunity to attack me, and my life was once again reduced to a headline.

It sent me into one of the darkest spirals of my life.

4/ After the story broke, former peers & political opponents began contacting Harvard urging them to rescind me. Harvard then sent this letter stating that Harvard “reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission” and requested a written explanation within 72 hours.

5/ I responded to the letter with a full explanation, apology, and requested documents.

6/ I also sent an email to the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to seek guidance on how to right this wrong and work with them once I was on campus.

7/ Harvard decided to rescind my admission with the following letter.

8/ Somewhat ironically, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion sent me this response regarding my apology:

“Thank you for your email. We appreciate your thoughtful reflections and look forward to connecting with you upon your matriculation in the fall of 2020…”

9/ After receiving Harvard’s letter revoking my acceptance, I responded by asking for the opportunity to have an in-person meeting to make my case face to face and work towards any possible path of reconciliation.

Harvard responded by declining my meeting request.

10/ Harvard deciding that someone can’t grow, especially after a life-altering event like the shooting, is deeply concerning. If any institution should understand growth, it’s Harvard, which is looked to as the pinnacle of higher education despite its checkered past.

12/ I believe that institutions and people can grow. I’ve said that repeatedly.

In the end, this isn’t about me, it’s about whether we live in a society in which forgiveness is possible or mistakes brand you as irredeemable, as Harvard has decided for me.

13/ So what now? I’m figuring it out.

I had given up huge scholarships in order to go to Harvard, and the deadline for accepting other college offers has ended.

I’m exploring all options at the moment.

Reactions:

The progressive black balling of Kyle Kashuv is a reminder that there’s no concept of grace in the secular religion.

One of the predictable lessons from the Kashuv situation: people will avoid public life. If Kashuv hadn’t become an activist after Parkland, he’s never targeted.

This mob was being led by the worst elements on the right, including open bigots, and the worst elements on the left. I hope those that joined in to target a kid are proud of themselves.

H/T: Right Scoop

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Southwest Caves to Pressure from Anti-Vaccine Employees

But there’s one heck of a catch.

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Last weekend was an unfortunate one for Southwest Airlines, who suffered from the cancelation of nearly a third of their flight schedule…and just days after they announced that a vaccine mandate would soon go into effect for their thousands of employees.

The airlines denied that the vaccine mandate had anything to do with the cancelations, blaming weather and air traffic control issues.  But, when researchers compared the number of total flights cancelled to the number of Southwest flights cancelled, it was fairly obvious that this was a localized issue.

Only a few days after that, a massive protest of their vaccine mandate hit home near headquarters.

By Tuesday of this week, the airline had been forced to back down.

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Southwest Airlines dropped a plan to put unvaccinated workers with pending exemptions on unpaid leave after a December 8 deadline following protests by their employees.

“The employee will continue to work, while following all COVID mask and distancing guidelines applicable to their position, until the accommodation has been processed,” according to an internal note obtained by CNBC written by Southwest’s Senior Vice President of Operations and Hospitality Steve Goldberg and Vice President and Chief People Officer Julie Weber.

And then, even after a new deadline was set, the company doesn’t appear to be baring its teeth in regard to enforcement.

The company is giving employees until November 24 to finish their vaccinations or apply for a medical or religious exemptions. While these exemptions are pending, employees will continue being paid, and those who are rejected will continue working “as we coordinate with them on meeting the requirements (vaccine or valid accommodation),” CNBC reported.

It was unclear exactly where the buck would ultimately stop with the new timeline, but there is little doubt that we’ll soon find out.

Last weekend was an unfortunate one for Southwest Airlines, who suffered from the cancelation of nearly a third of their flight schedule…and just days after they announced that a vaccine mandate would soon go into effect for their thousands of employees. The airlines denied that the vaccine mandate had anything to do with the cancelations, blaming weather and air traffic control issues.  But, when researchers compared the number of total flights cancelled to the number of Southwest flights cancelled, it was fairly obvious that this was a localized issue. Only a few days after that, a massive protest of their vaccine mandate hit home near headquarters. By Tuesday of this week, the airline had been forced to back down. Southwest Airlines dropped a plan to put unvaccinated workers with pending exemptions on unpaid leave after a December 8 deadline following protests by their employees. “The employee will continue to work, while following all COVID mask and distancing guidelines applicable to their position, until the accommodation has been processed,” according to an internal note obtained by CNBC written by Southwest’s Senior Vice President of Operations and Hospitality Steve Goldberg and Vice President and Chief People Officer Julie Weber. And then, even after a new deadline was set, the company doesn’t appear to be baring its teeth in regard to enforcement. The company is giving employees until November 24 to finish their vaccinations or apply for a medical or religious exemptions. While these exemptions are pending, employees will continue being paid, and those who are rejected will continue working “as we coordinate with them on meeting the requirements (vaccine or valid accommodation),” CNBC reported. It was unclear exactly where the buck would ultimately stop with the new timeline, but there is little doubt that we’ll soon find out.

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Senator Obliterates Dr. Fauci’s Holiday Gathering Advice

“We don’t need permission”!

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If you follow the science, and the math, it’s beginning to become clear that the coronavirus pandemic is waning.  Again.

In the days before the Delta variant became the prominent strain of COVID-19, we were just about out of this whole mess.  Venues and restaurants were opening again.  People were beginning to gather at home or with friends.  When delta arrived, the ease retracted a bit.  The masks were a little more prevalent.

But now, if you simply look at the case numbers and infection rates, it is plain to see that everything is going to be okay.

This is what Florida Senator Rick Scott believes, as evidenced by his latest comments regarding the advice of Dr. Anthony Fauci.

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Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL), chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), dismissed suggestions that Dr. Anthony Fauci can give or take away permission for Americans to celebrate the holidays with their families, calling it “insane that the government thinks it can tell people how to live.”

“We don’t need Fauci’s permission to celebrate the holidays with family. People are smart. They know how to make decisions that best protect their loved ones. It’s insane that the government thinks it can tell people how to live,” Scott said in response to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases chief’s recent remarks […]

Fauci had recently insinuated that gathering with people outside of your immediate home over the holidays may not be advisable, suggesting instead that people continue to socially distance from even their own family.

 

If you follow the science, and the math, it’s beginning to become clear that the coronavirus pandemic is waning.  Again. In the days before the Delta variant became the prominent strain of COVID-19, we were just about out of this whole mess.  Venues and restaurants were opening again.  People were beginning to gather at home or with friends.  When delta arrived, the ease retracted a bit.  The masks were a little more prevalent. But now, if you simply look at the case numbers and infection rates, it is plain to see that everything is going to be okay. This is what Florida Senator Rick Scott believes, as evidenced by his latest comments regarding the advice of Dr. Anthony Fauci. Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL), chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), dismissed suggestions that Dr. Anthony Fauci can give or take away permission for Americans to celebrate the holidays with their families, calling it “insane that the government thinks it can tell people how to live.” “We don’t need Fauci’s permission to celebrate the holidays with family. People are smart. They know how to make decisions that best protect their loved ones. It’s insane that the government thinks it can tell people how to live,” Scott said in response to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases chief’s recent remarks […] Fauci had recently insinuated that gathering with people outside of your immediate home over the holidays may not be advisable, suggesting instead that people continue to socially distance from even their own family.  

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