Connect with us

Wire

Rasmussen Poll Hits Ridiculous Highs RE Biden: ‘Strongly Disapprove’

Western Journal

Published

on

A new presidential tracking poll shows that the number of Americans with a low opinion of President Joe Biden’s job performance has hit a shocking high.

If you’ve been paying attention, it certainly comes as no surprise that more and more people are waking up to the disaster that is the Biden administration. Still, seeing it in the polling really makes you wonder how Democrats at this point can even defend the madness.

A daily presidential tracking poll released Tuesday by Rasmussen Reports shows that Biden’s disapproval rating among likely voters has skyrocketed. In the Tuesday poll, 50 percent of those who responded to Rasmussen said they “strongly disapprove” of Biden’s job performance.

Only 20 percent, meanwhile, “strongly approve” of Biden’s performance, giving him a Daily Approval Index of -30.

Biden has officially lost half the country, or is it worse? It’s worse.

Biden’s total “disapprove” number is actually 57 percent, according to Rasmussen, just one point shy of being the lowest of his presidency.

As Rasmussen noted: “41% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Biden’s job performance. Fifty-seven percent (57%) disapprove. The latest figures include 20% who Strongly Approve of the job Biden is doing and 50% who Strongly Disapprove.”

As the graphic with the Rasmussen Twitter post shows, former President Donald Trump at this point in his presidency had a higher approval percentage. Remember, Trump faced a continuous onslaught of negative coverage from the mainstream media, while Biden has benefitted from an establishment media dedicated to propping up his presidency.

His failures simply can’t be covered up.

Biden managed to first hit 50 percent with regard to voters who said they strongly disapprove of him back on Sept. 27, according to Rasmussen’s tracking history. He hit that number again on Monday and Tuesday.

Biden actually hovered between a 36 to 43 percent strong disapproval rating from the time he was inaugurated until the beginning of the Afghanistan debacle, the tracking history shows. That deadly defeat apparently managed to break the camel’s back.

Biden’s decision to surrender the world’s most powerful military over to a bunch of goat farmers in Kabul seems to have sent him across the Rubicon. Once it became apparent that America would lose a 20-year war under, and defeat became humiliation, there was never any turning back.

Combine that with Biden’s continuing crisis on the border, inflation, energy prices and never-ending gaffes and it’s easy to see why the American public is losing patience.

Since then, the Biden White House has even been scrutinized by the establishment media. Apparently even hack reporters can’t stomach a wimp — which Biden is.

We’re living in a carousel of crises, and there is no longer any hiding it.

Americans tend to be patient when they can put food on the table while feeling secure that someone is looking out for them. Under Biden, Americans are actually being targeted by the federal government.

Biden has divided the population through, race, gender and COVID vaccine status since his first day in office. After Afghanistan, he’s lost most of the country’s support.

There is no forgetting that when times were tough, the country’s commander in chief stuck his tail between his legs and abandoned high school kids in a Middle Eastern wasteland.

Rasmussen daily presidential tracking polls contact a total of 500 likely voters via telephone. Another “demographically diverse” 1,000 are polled randomly online. The polls report a margin of error of 2.5 points.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Wire

Buttigieg Tells Americans to Get Used to ‘Disruptions,’ ‘Shocks to the System’

Western Journal

Published

on

Having less is just the way life goes in President Joe Biden’s America, according to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg.

Buttigieg, who was on paternity leave for months as the supply chain crisis intensified, made the interview rounds this week and put a happy face on the crisis.

In comments Wednesday, he indicated Americans will need to get used to delays and potentially seeing empty shelves for the foreseeable future.

“There are going to be disruptions and shocks to the system as long as the pandemic continues,” he said, according to Reuters.

Rating firm Moody’s said Wednesday that the supply chain issues plaguing America will likely not subside any time soon, and shortages, higher transportation costs and higher prices will ripple through the economy.

But Buttigieg found a sunny side in all that when he popped in for a chat on “The View.”

Is the Biden administration totally incompetent?

“Americans have more money in their pockets compared to a year ago,” Buttigieg said, according to ABC News.

“Where they used to maybe spend it on going to shows or travel, they’ve been more likely to spend it on things, which is why actually we have a record number of goods coming through our ports.”

“Retail sales are through the roof, that’s part of why we have this challenge.”

Buttigieg also put in a brief plug for the infrastructure bill House Democrats have been holding hostage for weeks.

“There’s no easy fix. There’s no magic wand, but there are a lot of things we can do,” Buttigieg said. “We’re relying on infrastructure that was built decades ago, sometimes a century ago.”

His comments on “The View” echoed those made during his Sunday interview on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“Certainly a lot of the challenges that we’ve been experiencing this year will continue into next year. But there are both short-term and long-term steps that we can take to do something about it,” Buttigieg told host Jake Tapper.

“Look, part of what’s happening isn’t just the supply side, it’s the demand side. Demand is off the charts. This is one more example of why we need to pass the infrastructure bill,” he continued.

“There are $17 billion in the President’s infrastructure plan for ports alone and we need to deal with these long-term issues that have made us vulnerable to these kinds of bottlenecks when there are demand fluctuations, shocks and disruptions like the ones that have been caused by the pandemic.”

Tucker Carlson Tonight” host Tucker Carlson said Tuesday that instead of leaders telling Americans they can fix the problems of the nation, the Biden administration is telling Americans to live with them.

Here’s how Carlson summed up the trend: “As your quality of life declines, you are instructed not to notice.”

Slamming an Op-Ed published by The Washington Post that scolded Americans for “[ranting] about short-staffed stores and supply chain woes,” Carlson made that into a symbol of what’s wrong with the nation.

“So if you don’t like the fact the shelves are bare in your local store, don’t throw a fit. Don’t be an entitled little tool. Lower your expectations. What did you expect in America? Come on. Bread lines, we’ve always had bread lines. It’s sort of charmingly retro, these bread lines. Don’t complain as your life becomes worse and as your country degrades,” he said.

“That’s the message, and not surprisingly, that message is coming directly from the people who are making your life worse and destroying the country. That would, of course, would be the White House.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Having less is just the way life goes in President Joe Biden’s America, according to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. Buttigieg, who was on paternity leave for months as the supply chain crisis intensified, made the interview rounds this week and put a happy face on the crisis. In comments Wednesday, he indicated Americans will need to get used to delays and potentially seeing empty shelves for the foreseeable future. “There are going to be disruptions and shocks to the system as long as the pandemic continues,” he said, according to Reuters. Pete Buttigieg couldn’t organize a one car funeral—he’s not going to organize our ports, railroads, highways, and airports. pic.twitter.com/Fh0NjbgGFx — Tom Cotton (@SenTomCotton) October 14, 2021 Rating firm Moody’s said Wednesday that the supply chain issues plaguing America will likely not subside any time soon, and shortages, higher transportation costs and higher prices will ripple through the economy. But Buttigieg found a sunny side in all that when he popped in for a chat on “The View.”

Is the Biden administration totally incompetent?
“Americans have more money in their pockets compared to a year ago,” Buttigieg said, according to ABC News. “Where they used to maybe spend it on going to shows or travel, they’ve been more likely to spend it on things, which is why actually we have a record number of goods coming through our ports.” “Retail sales are through the roof, that’s part of why we have this challenge.” Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg says supply chain disruptions will “continue into next year.” “… demand is up, because income is up, because the president has successfully guided this economy out of the teeth of a terrifying recession.” pic.twitter.com/uuFPhZoG8z — The Recount (@therecount) October 17, 2021 Buttigieg also put in a brief plug for the infrastructure bill House Democrats have been holding hostage…

Continue Reading

Wire

Biden Struggles to Speak, Gives Up and Says, ‘Uh, Um, What Am I Doing Here?’

Western Journal

Published

on

In 1992, during the most improbably successful third-party run at the presidency in modern American political history, billionaire businessman Ross Perot selected retired Navy Vice Adm. James Stockdale as his running mate.

Stockdale was a relative unknown in the rarefied air of presidential politics, but his resumé as a leader was impeccable. As the Department of Defense’s website notes, he was “the only three-star admiral to have worn both aviator wings and the Medal of Honor.”

A prisoner of war in Vietnam, he spent almost eight years in the Hanoi Hilton. He was president of the Naval War College until his retirement from the service in 1979, by which point he had earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Distinguished Service Medals, four Silver Stars and two Purple Hearts.

Perot was the last third-party candidate to meet the 15 percent threshold set by the Commission on Presidential Debates to appear on stage against the Republican and Democratic candidates — meaning Stockdale also appeared in the vice presidential debate.

take our poll - story continues below

Should Congress Remove Biden from Office?

  • Should Congress Remove Biden from Office?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Flag And Cross updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Attempting to address his relative anonymity straight off, Stockdale quipped, “Who am I? Why am I here?”

America didn’t get the joke. It became Stockdale’s epitaph; nothing he did before or after would much stick in our cultural consciousness. Thanks in no small part to the media’s ill-concealed joy in reporting Stockdale’s failed attempt at humor, we all remember one of our great war heroes as a man who found his way onto a vice presidential debate stage by accident, as if he’d sleepwalked there in his bathrobe and slippers.

Twenty-nine years and eight days after James Stockdale said those words in jest, the president of these United States stood on a stage and asked — in all seriousness — “What am I doing here?” And the media didn’t bat an eye.

On Thursday, President Joe Biden was in Baltimore for another interminable softball CNN town hall. For the most part, this might as well have been a campaign rally to sell his agenda and his image.

For instance, did you know Biden once raced Corvettes with the recently deceased Colin Powell? If you watched, you did.

“He and I went out [to] the Secret Service racetrack. He had a brand new Corvette, his family bought him, his kids bought him, and I have a ’67 327 350, and we raced. We raced. And, you know, the only reason — no, I’m serious. It was on Jay Leno. Check it out. Jay Leno. He is a hell of a guy,” Biden said, according to a CNN transcript.

Wonderful.

The “news” that came out of the town hall, at least to the media, is that Biden said “we’re going to have to move to the point where we fundamentally alter the filibuster.”

The takeaway was supposed to be that Uncle Joe was angry at those do-nothing Republicans opposing his agenda and was about to unleash the dogs of hell upon them.

The problem with this bombshell was that a) Biden has said this before, with the president taking serious jabs at the institution of the filibuster since at least March and b) the president can’t change the filibuster and hasn’t persuaded the holdout Democrats in the Senate who have refused to alter it, specifically Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona.

If you’d like some news from Thursday’s town hall, however, perhaps Biden’s James Stockdale moment would suffice.

In one of the rare uncomfortable moments of the night — one where Biden wasn’t railing against perfidious Republicans who won’t let Democrats charge a few trillion dollars of “free stuff” on the credit card of America’s youth, or where he wasn’t recalling how he went zoom-zoom in fast cars with Colin Powell — he was asked about the supply chain crisis.

Anna Hirsch, a Loyola University student, said that “growing up in a small town, I’ve been surrounded by small business owners including my mom, who owns her own interior design business. With the current supply chain crisis, small businesses are in jeopardy of not being able to get products that they need because priority is given to large businesses. Does your administration have any policies or plans in place to aid the current supply chain problem and/or to help small businesses that are affected by this?”

Of course he had plans for both of these things, but he acknowledged “we have a significant supply chain problem,” which he blamed on just-in-time inventory management, a business practice that ensures materials and goods are shipped and received as closely as possible to when they’re being produced or sold, thus reducing inventory and increasing profit.

“Now that’s a big problem. You can’t — people can’t do it. They want to get out ahead,” Biden said, according to the transcript.

“What I’ve recently done, and people said — or doubted we could get it done, I was able to go to the private portion — 40 percent of all products coming into the United States of America on the West Coast go through Los Angeles and –”

Then Biden paused, said, “Uh, um,” and asked, “What am I doing here?”

“Is it Long Beach?” host Anderson Cooper asked.

“Long Beach. Thank you,” Biden said.

Now, the supply chain crisis has ensured the average news-consuming American hears the city of Long Beach name-checked almost as often as on a Snoop Dogg album. The man who has the most power to solve the supply chain crisis, meanwhile, is on stage trying to remember its name — then asks, “What am I doing here?”

Is Joe Biden in cognitive decline?

I can’t answer that question, either, but I don’t think that’s why Biden was asking it.

Thankfully for the president, our moderator decided to intervene and save Biden’s hide. I’m sure Cooper would have done just the same thing for former President Donald Trump — right, America?

This isn’t nitpicking. Yes, Joe Biden has never been fleet of foot verbally. Since the beginning of his campaign, however, Biden’s stumbles have become increasingly common and increasingly worrying. We can’t just laugh them off anymore. This is our president’s month of October:

And the month isn’t even over yet.

These days, it feels as if Joe Biden is averaging at least one James Stockdale per speech. We’ve stopped paying attention, though, even though Biden is the most powerful man in the free world.

When the name of the key port in the supply chain crisis eludes him, he just stands there and sullenly asks, “What am I doing here?”

Good question. Too bad nobody in the media wants to follow up on it.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

In 1992, during the most improbably successful third-party run at the presidency in modern American political history, billionaire businessman Ross Perot selected retired Navy Vice Adm. James Stockdale as his running mate. Stockdale was a relative unknown in the rarefied air of presidential politics, but his resumé as a leader was impeccable. As the Department of Defense’s website notes, he was “the only three-star admiral to have worn both aviator wings and the Medal of Honor.” A prisoner of war in Vietnam, he spent almost eight years in the Hanoi Hilton. He was president of the Naval War College until his retirement from the service in 1979, by which point he had earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses, three Distinguished Service Medals, four Silver Stars and two Purple Hearts. Perot was the last third-party candidate to meet the 15 percent threshold set by the Commission on Presidential Debates to appear on stage against the Republican and Democratic candidates — meaning Stockdale also appeared in the vice presidential debate. Attempting to address his relative anonymity straight off, Stockdale quipped, “Who am I? Why am I here?” America didn’t get the joke. It became Stockdale’s epitaph; nothing he did before or after would much stick in our cultural consciousness. Thanks in no small part to the media’s ill-concealed joy in reporting Stockdale’s failed attempt at humor, we all remember one of our great war heroes as a man who found his way onto a vice presidential debate stage by accident, as if he’d sleepwalked there in his bathrobe and slippers. Twenty-nine years and eight days after James Stockdale said those words in jest, the president of these United States stood on a stage and asked — in all seriousness — “What am I doing here?” And the media didn’t bat an eye. On…

Continue Reading
The Schaftlein Report

Latest Articles

Best of the Week