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School District Defends ‘After School Satan Club’ at Elementary School

Western Journal

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An Illinois school district is defending an “After School Satan Club” amid an outcry because we are not yet at the point in the degradation of religious life in America where parents are comfortable with their elementary school students being invited to join a club named for the adversary of mankind.

Thankfully.

The extracurricular club is being organized by the Satanic Temple, which is wont to cook up such schemes as part of its broader mission to essentially thumb its nose at Christianity in public life by trying to create literally God-less alternatives. This is basically how members would describe it — they do not profess to worship Satan.

What can easily be described as an activist group designed to troll Christians, the Satanic Temple instead works to get Baphomet statues erected on public property, file lawsuits to protect legalized abortion in the name of the religious right to “abortion rituals,” and organize clubs in public schools like the aforementioned “After School Satan Club.”

The New York Post reported that volunteers will be running the program at Jane Addams Elementary School in Moline, Illinois, which aims to “help children learn benevolence and empathy, critical thinking, problem solving, creative expression and personal sovereignty.”

“Proselytization is not our goal, and we’re not interested in converting children to Satanism,” the group says on its website. “After School Satan Clubs will focus on free inquiry and rationalism, the scientific basis for which we know what we know about the world around us.”

“We prefer to give children an appreciation of the natural wonders surrounding them, not a fear of everlasting other-worldly horrors,” they add, also explaining that they only believe in Satan as a “mythical figure representing individual freedom.”

Flyers for the club, which were placed in school lobbies, raised alarm, prompting Moline-Coal Valley Schools Superintendent Rachel Savage to issue a letter assuring parents that “no teachers from Jane Addams, or any other district teacher, is involved” and that “flyers were not distributed to all students.”

A teacher who reached out to the Satanic Temple was told that since the school already offered a “child evangelism fellowship club,” the group wanted “to offer parents a choice of different viewpoints,” according to Savage, who also noted that the board of education allows school facilities to be used by community groups and churches.

“To illegally deny their organization … to pay to rent our publicly funded institution, after school hours, subjects the district to a discrimination lawsuit, which we will not win, likely taking thousands upon thousands of tax-payer dollars away from our teachers, staff, and classrooms,” she explained.

This is, of course, exactly what the Satanic Temple argues — that as a deliberately faux religion, it ought to be taken as seriously as Christianity is.

There are a few problems with this.

The After School Satan Club aims to introduce kids to things like free inquiry, scientific reasoning, critical thinking and rationality apart from religion. Contrary to the Satanic Temple’s suggestion, these things can and should be part of a religion-based education, and certainly are in this Christian mama’s homeschool curriculum.

These kids are enrolled in public school, where one would assume — or at the very least hope — that they are already being given the tools to think and reason for themselves in such a manner.

The Satanic Temple’s stated goal is to present alternatives to Christianity in public life, but it rather ironically undermines its own aim by offering children nothing that can’t coexist with a Christian worldview — other than the satanic imagery and determination not to think about the supernatural or eternal.

Here’s the thing about its commitment to saving children from a “fear of everlasting other-worldly horrors”: The Christian faith offers real salvation from these horrors and posits that they exist whether we acknowledge them or not.

What anti-theists have long misunderstood about Christianity is that its adherents do not condemn non-believers to everlasting otherworldly horror — they seek to save them from it. It is no great act of compassion to spare a child the knowledge of his eternal fate apart from Christ.

Meanwhile, the commitment to offering children an educational alternative to Christianity is moot, as God has largely been stricken from public school classrooms. A schooling free of the influence of the great canon of classical Christian philosophy is basically all that public education can now hope to be, and all that the Satanic Temple aims for, anyway.

We can certainly surmise from the growing popularity of homeschooling that many, many Americans agree with yours truly that ridding education of the great theistic traditions has had unsettling results.

Anti-Christians often totally miss that the First Amendment protects the church from the government; it is hardly the other way around.

The God of the Bible, while certainly perceived differently by different Founding Fathers, is nonetheless the God in whom our nation has long professed to trust, and faith in him has always influenced the decisions Americans make about how to legislate, govern and educate. We’d be far better off with a lot more of this, not less.

There may be millions of Americans who no longer fear God, but it simply has not been possible to cleanly remove him from public life because doing so would undermine the founding of our nation to begin with.

The lack of faith has left a gaping wound in American civic life, and the trajectory of the last several decades in which we’ve banished God from our midst supplies ample evidence that it has not done anyone any good (except maybe abortionists, pornographers and human traffickers, but I digress).

No matter how popular the animus toward religion has gotten today, it is impossible to divorce this animus from the values that gave us our freedom in the first place, as those values are based on the existence of God.

Christian after-school clubs offer children hope, a sense of purpose in something greater than themselves and a framework to understand who they are — that is, they offer the knowledge of God. This doesn’t run counter to a rich education or the ability to be a compassionate and independent member of society — it greatly enhances them!

What does a belief system centered on plain defiance to God offer children but more animus toward the one who made them and who offers them salvation from the bonds of sin and death?

In this writer’s humble opinion, absolutely nothing at all. No worldview can be truly rational when it is built on the void.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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Private Jet Owned by Climate Alarmist Elon Musk Takes Flight of Just 31 Miles

Western Journal

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Stop it! Stop the climate change!

So says offbeat entrepreneur Elon Musk. Bill Gates, too — he’s so alarmed about the climate that he says we need to get rid of cows and eat plastic meat. Or something.

But why believe these guys? Both indulge in what Gates calls a “guilty pleasure.” Despite what they preach, Musk and Gates travel in private jets.

Last week, Musk’s jet was tracked — on Twitter, no less — flying from San Jose, California, to San Francisco. That’s about 31 miles, a flight lasting nine minutes, The Byte reported.

To be fair, there’s no record Musk was on that flight — it might have been moved for maintenance or something. But Gates’ guilty pleasure is extreme — he has four “business jets,” according to Simple Flying.

So while you save the planet chewing on a vegan burger, Gates gets to pollute the skies more than you and I probably will in several lifetimes.

Then there’s John Kerry, President Joe Biden’s go-to guy to fix the climate. He jetted aloft at least 16 times last year, and not in a government plane, but in a jet belonging to his family.

What is it with these people?

Musk’s brilliance is off the charts. And while he has some oddball ideas, Gates, of course, is also smart. But when it comes to hypocrisy and the optics of what they are doing, both are clueless.

To Musk, one of the world’s greatest threats is climate change. A carbon tax will solve that, he once told podcaster Joe Rogan.

We should tax behavior that produces carbon emissions and “the market will react in a sensible way,” Musk said, according to CNBC. “But because we don’t have a price on it, it is behaving badly.”

So rich guys like Musk can freely engage in their climate sins by offsetting their guilt with taxes? If that sounds familiar, you might recall Martin Luther and his thoughts on church sales of indulgences.

Unlike the growing number of neo-feudalists, Musk at least recognizes the potential carbon tax burdens on those who are not wealthy, who inevitably impact the climate in their little ways by heating their homes and by breathing.

Low-income users of large amounts of gas would get a carbon tax rebate, he said. And, by paying the tax, Musk is free to ride his jet. And of course, he’s one of the Good Guys since he’s saving the planet with his electric cars.

Gates, when not pushing to vaccinate everything that moves, worries about climate change, as outlined in his book “How to Avoid Climate Disaster.” Despite dumping 1,600 tons of CO2 in the atmosphere during his 59 private jet flights in 2017, he takes care of his conscience by buying clean aviation fuel and funding carbon-capture technology.

Carbon capture draws carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and then stores it until needed for some kind of beneficial economic project. Apparently, no one considers carbon dioxide being converted into oxygen by plants as having economic value.

So the Musks and Gates and Kerrys continue to fly and to buy all their cool stuff. I don’t begrudge them that.

It’s just that some of us are skeptical about human-caused climate change. What we believe has been called “fraud” by Musk, according to Futurism.

But what do you call it when the rich guys get to pour filth in the skies while preaching cleanliness to us?

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Stop it! Stop the climate change! So says offbeat entrepreneur Elon Musk. Bill Gates, too — he’s so alarmed about the climate that he says we need to get rid of cows and eat plastic meat. Or something. But why believe these guys? Both indulge in what Gates calls a “guilty pleasure.” Despite what they preach, Musk and Gates travel in private jets. Last week, Musk’s jet was tracked — on Twitter, no less — flying from San Jose, California, to San Francisco. That’s about 31 miles, a flight lasting nine minutes, The Byte reported. Landed in San Francisco, California, US. Apx. flt. time 9 Mins. pic.twitter.com/8vWvODLEOL — ElonJet (@ElonJet) May 6, 2022 To be fair, there’s no record Musk was on that flight — it might have been moved for maintenance or something. But Gates’ guilty pleasure is extreme — he has four “business jets,” according to Simple Flying. So while you save the planet chewing on a vegan burger, Gates gets to pollute the skies more than you and I probably will in several lifetimes. Then there’s John Kerry, President Joe Biden’s go-to guy to fix the climate. He jetted aloft at least 16 times last year, and not in a government plane, but in a jet belonging to his family. What is it with these people? Musk’s brilliance is off the charts. And while he has some oddball ideas, Gates, of course, is also smart. But when it comes to hypocrisy and the optics of what they are doing, both are clueless. To Musk, one of the world’s greatest threats is climate change. A carbon tax will solve that, he once told podcaster Joe Rogan. We should tax behavior that produces carbon emissions and “the market will react in a sensible way,” Musk said, according to CNBC.…

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Melania Trump Breaks Year-Long Public Silence to Call Out ‘Leadership’ Over ‘Heartbreaking’ Formula Shortage

Western Journal

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Former first lady Melania Trump, who spent her time in the White House calling attention to children the world forgot, said America’s infant formula shortage is “heartbreaking.”

Trump sat down with Pete Hegseth of Fox News for what is being reported as her first interview since leaving the White House, the Washington Examiner reported. The interview will air Sunday. Fox posted a clip of the interview on Friday.

“I think it’s sad to see what’s going on if you really look deeply into it,” Trump said when asked to assess the state of the country.


“I think a lot of people are struggling and suffering and what is going on around the world as well. So it’s very sad to see, and I hope it changes fast,” Trump added.

Hegseth then asked about the formula shortage.

“It’s heartbreaking to see that they are struggling and the food is not available for children in [the] 21st century in the United States of America,” Trump said.

“Why is it happening?” Hegseth asked.

“Leadership,” she said.

“Leadership or lack thereof?” he followed up.

The answer came in a heartbeat: “Yeah.”

President Joe Biden was asked Friday if his administration could have responded faster to the shortage.

“If we’d been better mind readers, I guess we could have,” he told reporters, according to CNN.

In another clip posted by Fox, Trump spoke about the media bias she faced in the White House.


Hegseth noted that Vogue magazine never featured Trump on its cover, a distinction that went to Hillary Clinton, former first lady Michelle Obama (three times), Vice President Kamala Harris and first lady Jill Biden.

“They’re biased and they have likes and dislikes, and it’s so obvious,” Trump said.

“And I think [the] American people and everyone see it. It was their decision, and I have much more important things to do — and I did in the White House — than being on the cover of Vogue.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Former first lady Melania Trump, who spent her time in the White House calling attention to children the world forgot, said America’s infant formula shortage is “heartbreaking.” Trump sat down with Pete Hegseth of Fox News for what is being reported as her first interview since leaving the White House, the Washington Examiner reported. The interview will air Sunday. Fox posted a clip of the interview on Friday. “I think it’s sad to see what’s going on if you really look deeply into it,” Trump said when asked to assess the state of the country. Watch the latest video at foxnews.com “I think a lot of people are struggling and suffering and what is going on around the world as well. So it’s very sad to see, and I hope it changes fast,” Trump added. Hegseth then asked about the formula shortage. “It’s heartbreaking to see that they are struggling and the food is not available for children in [the] 21st century in the United States of America,” Trump said. “Why is it happening?” Hegseth asked. “Leadership,” she said. “Leadership or lack thereof?” he followed up. The answer came in a heartbeat: “Yeah.” President Joe Biden was asked Friday if his administration could have responded faster to the shortage. “If we’d been better mind readers, I guess we could have,” he told reporters, according to CNN. In another clip posted by Fox, Trump spoke about the media bias she faced in the White House. Watch the latest video at foxnews.com Hegseth noted that Vogue magazine never featured Trump on its cover, a distinction that went to Hillary Clinton, former first lady Michelle Obama (three times), Vice President Kamala Harris and first lady Jill Biden. “They’re biased and they have likes and dislikes, and it’s so obvious,” Trump said. “And I…

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