Linkedin Share
Wire

Teen Accused of Intentionally Hitting and Killing Cyclist Said He'd Get a 'Slap on the Wrist'

Linkedin Share

The Las Vegas teen who is accused of stealing a car and then using it to intentionally run down a man on a bicycle said he thought all he would get for his crimes is a “slap on the wrist.”

Jesus Ayala, who was 17 when he was allegedly driving a stolen car used to murder a former California police chief who was out riding his bike on the morning of Aug. 14, showed no remorse at all for his actions in court, according to KLAS-TV.

In court, Las Vegas Police prosecutors said that the suspect boasted that because he was a juvenile he would never do any real time for his crime spree and that he’d end up with just a “slap on the wrist” in the courts.

“You think this juvenile [expletive] is gonna do some [expletive]? I’ll be out in 30 days, I’ll bet you,” an officer told the court that the teen said as he was being arrested.

Trending:
Massive Migrant Caravan Marches Toward US with LGBT Flags Flying as Mexican President Snubs Biden at Summit


“It’s just ah, [expletive] ah, hit-and-run — slap on the wrist,” Ayala reportedly added.

The teen suspect’s comments were captured by police body cameras.

The boast seems to be further evidence that teens feel they can commit any crime they like with impunity and they will be released right back into society by George Soros-style prosecutors whose soft-on-crime policies only tend to embolden the criminal class.

Shocking video of the death of 64-year-old retired police officer Andreas Probst went viral and shows a reportedly stolen Hyundai Elantra driving down the street and then swerving toward the side of the road in order to run Probst down.

Should these suspects get a very long prison sentence if convicted?

Voices that police say belong to Ayala, who was allegedly driving the car, and his 16-year-old passenger, Jzamir Keys, are heard saying “bump him” and laughing after Probst is run down.

WARNING: The following video contains vulgar language and disturbing content that some viewers may find offensive.

Prosecutors say that Keys recorded the video as Ayala was driving and that the pair were in the middle of a crime spree resulting in Probst’s death.

Related:
Desperate CNN's Latest Stunt with NBA Legend Charles Barkley is Major Flop

The two reportedly stole three cars and perpetrated three hit-and-runs, along with killing the bicyclist. They also reportedly purposefully destroyed the cars they stole.

The stolen vehicle used to run Probst down was found with blood on the windshield where the bicycle rider collided with the glass after being hit.

Probst was later found lying unresponsive on the side of the road by his daughter after she was alerted by an iPhone notification that he had fallen, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Ultimately, the viral video helped authorities determine that the downing of the bicyclist was an “intentional act,” according to KLAS-TV.

Despite Ayala’s boasts that he would face no jail time because he was a minor, prosecutors said that the suspect who has since turned 18 in jail would be prosecuted as an adult, not a juvenile.

After his arrest, the District Attorney’s Office announced that it was seeking to charge Ayala as an adult, but KLAS-TV noted that if a teen is charged with murder in Nevada, it is automatically upgraded to a charge as an adult.

Sure enough, the pair appeared in court on Thursday and both were charged as adults with a series of offenses, one of which was murder.

Clark County District Attorney Steve Wolfson advised the court to keep the pair in custody after their initial hearing and both were remanded to the Clark County Detention Center in Downtown Las Vegas to await their next court date scheduled for Tuesday.

“The determination of whether somebody should remain in custody is based upon whether they’re a flight risk or a danger to the community,” Wolfson stated. “I believe they’re potentially both. They have certainly proved that they are dangerous.”

The incident is more proof that young people often have no fear of the justice system and feel they can commit any act they please without repercussion. Until our courts go back to treating juvenile crime seriously, this dismissive and brutal behavior will continue.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Submit a Correction →



Linkedin Share

Conversation