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The Illinois Civil War General Who Helped Create Memorial Day

A few years after the Civil War, as the nation started upon its long road toward reconciliation, Memorial Day was created.

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A few years after the Civil War, as the nation started upon its long road toward reconciliation, rebuilding, and healing the wife of one of the war’s union generals noticed the touching devotion of Confederate widows, wives and their children as each year they came together to place flowers and little flags at the graves of their fallen. Mary Simmerson Cunningham Logan was so moved by the devotion she witnessed that she urged her husband, Illinois General John A. “Blackjack” Logan, to look into creating what was to become Memorial Day.

General Logan was a Senator from Illinois and eventually became a candidate for Vice President on the 1884 Republican ticket, losing to Grover Cleveland and another Illinoisan, Vice President Adlai Stevenson. But before all that Logan was instrumental in creating Decoration Day, the celebration of the nation’s war dead that eventually became Memorial Day.

The following is the general order that Logan issued in 1868.

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HEADQUARTERS GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC
General Orders No.11, WASHINGTON, D.C., May 5, 1868

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The 30th day of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet church-yard in the land. In this observance no form of ceremony is prescribed, but posts and comrades will in their own way arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect as circumstances may permit.

We are organized, comrades, as our regulations tell us, for the purpose among other things, “of preserving and strengthening those kind and fraternal feelings which have bound together the soldiers, sailors, and marines who united to suppress the late rebellion.” What can aid more to assure this result than cherishing tenderly the memory of our heroic dead, who made their breasts a barricade between our country and its foes? Their soldier lives were the reveille of freedom to a race in chains, and their deaths the tattoo of rebellious tyranny in arms. We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. All that the consecrated wealth and taste of the nation can add to their adornment and security is but a fitting tribute to the memory of her slain defenders. Let no wanton foot tread rudely on such hallowed grounds. Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no vandalism of avarice or neglect, no ravages of time testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.

If other eyes grow dull, other hands slack, and other hearts cold in the solemn trust, ours shall keep it well as long as the light and warmth of life remain to us.

Let us, then, at the time appointed gather around their sacred remains and garland the passionless mounds above them with the choicest flowers of spring-time; let us raise above them the dear old flag they saved from dishonor; let us in this solemn presence renew our pledges to aid and assist those whom they have left among us a sacred charge upon a nation’s gratitude, the soldier’s and sailor’s widow and orphan.

It is the purpose of the Commander-in-Chief to inaugurate this observance with the hope that it will be kept up from year to year, while a survivor of the war remains to honor the memory of his departed comrades. He earnestly desires the public press to lend its friendly aid in bringing to the notice of comrades in all parts of the country in time for simultaneous compliance therewith.

Department commanders will use efforts to make this order effective.
By order of

JOHN A. LOGAN,
Commander-in-Chief

N.P. CHIPMAN,
Adjutant General

Official:
WM. T. COLLINS, A.A.G.

Today, America takes the time to remember those who served and died in service to our country and it is fitting that the holiday was born of both a re-united South and North after our bloodiest war.

Please enjoy your Memorial Day and say a prayer for the souls of our fallen heroes.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Facebook at: facebook.com/Warner.Todd.Huston.

History

June 6, 1944 D-Day: The Allied Invasion Saves The World From Nazi Tyranny.

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June 6, 2021, is the 77th Anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy. The invasion that saved the world from Nazi allied invasion of Normandy On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of the heavily fortified French coastline to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Code named Operation Overlord, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” The invasion was supposed to happen on the 5th, but the weather forced Eisenhower to delay: Capt. James Martin Stagg was the chief meteorologist of the British Royal Air Force and was the one to brief Eisenhower about the rough seas and lashing rain affecting the shore on June 5. Stagg previsioned the small window of better weather for early morning June 6….The Germans did not foresee this brief break in the bad weather. In fact, they forecast unsettled weather until mid-June. In charge with the defense of the invasion of beaches with the Germans, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was certain there would be no invasion between June 5 and 8 because the tides would not be favorable. Rommel was very wrong. On June 6th, more than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foothold in Continental Europe. Within ten days, there were half a million troops ashore, and within three weeks, there were two million. Allied invasion of Normandy The invasion was the most massive amphibious military assault in history and required extensive planning. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded. Their sacrifice allowed the allies to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, defeat Adolph Hitler’s troops, and save…

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History

Erasing History? Tiananmen Square, the Anniversary China Wants Us To Forget

What happened in China on June 4th, 1989, is something worth remembering every year.

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By Wes Walker Should we respect China as just another modern state in the competitive mix with all the others? Or should we view their regime more like a dangerous coiled snake waiting for its chance to strike? If you listen to Hollywood, the NBA, and even Joe Biden, you might be lulled to sleep by the lullaby that China is just another advanced nation taking its place at the table among friendly rival nations… that we shouldn’t take their threats to nuke America too seriously. Nor should we worry too much about the COVID cover-up, or the various inroads they have been making at corrupting Universities, stealing IP, acquiring dual-use technologies, ramping up their military potential, or harassing their neighbors. And we definitely, definitely, shouldn’t pay any attention to the close financial ties Joe Biden’s family has to the CCP… asking who the Big Guy is who gets 10% is strictly off-limits. But some of us have memories longer than a goldfish. And June 4th happens to mark an important day in history — one worth remembering every year. A famous photo from that event is etched in the minds of most anyone who was alive to remember when it was news. https://twitter.com/txsharmatweet/status/1400168668261011456 Here’s an image of that day you probably have NOT seen before. https://twitter.com/Stand_with_HK/status/1398289205680353281 The Chinese army crackdown on the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests killed at least 10,000 people, according to newly released UK documents. The figure was given in a secret diplomatic cable from then British ambassador to China, Sir Alan Donald. The original source was a friend of a member of China’s State Council, the envoy says. Previous estimates of the deaths in the pro-democracy protests ranged from several hundred to more than 1,000. China’s statement at the end of June 1989 said that 200…

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