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The NRA, In Their Legal Battle With New York AG, Gets VERY Unlikely Ally

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There was a time when liberty was a universal value. In the last decade, we’ve watched as those on the right and the left became so polarized–and so polarizing–in their own pet issues, they often seem to have forgotten that liberty for one is liberty for all.

And whether or not you agree with the rights of given advocacy groups, there is a point where if you see their First Amendment rights to advocate for their pet issues is worth defending…because their First Amendment is your First Amendment, too.

This is, stunningly, the reasoning the ACLU has apparently taken as they’ve decided to step up to the plate on behalf of the NRA.

Yes, you read that right.

The far-left, notoriously progressive American Civil Liberties Union has sided with the National Rifle Association, the Second Amendment advocacy group on which the vast majority of the left seems to rest all the blame for gun violence.

This is absolutely the kind of thing we need to see much, much more of these days.

The case has to do with the New York Attorney General’s attempt to punish corporations or financial institutions that do business with the NRA, which is something that, the ACLU has quite sensibly realized, if successful, could sent a precedence for other states to target groups the ACLU likes, like Planned Parenthood or even the ACLU itself.

The Daily Wire explains:

The state of New York is looking to repeat the Obama Administration’s disastrous, and likely unconstitutional efforts in Operation Choke Point, a Department of Justice program that levied similar sanctions on institutions that did business with groups the Obama Administration considered “unsavory,” like gun manufacturers, fireworks vendors, home-based charities, payday lenders, pornography producers, and, according to Forbes, any “legal businesses that the Obama administration deem[ed] to be politically incorrect.”

Operation Choke Point ended in 2017, after it fell under Congressional scrutiny. The Trump Administration ended the practice completely.

But then New York decided to take up the yoke of punishing businesses it felt didn’t deserve the right to contract with whom they pleased inside the state’s borders.

Initially the NRA argued that it would suffer severe financial damage because of New York’s rules, but later, the Texas Public Policy foundation, arguing on behalf of the NRA, suggested that New York’s efforts actually impacted the NRA’s First Amendment rights.

In their amicus brief, the ACLU agreed, arguing that New York’s rule “‘would set a dangerous precedent for advocacy groups,’ no matter their viewpoint, because public officials would be encouraged to use their regulatory power against the ‘disfavored.'”

Well goodness gracious there just might be hope for our liberal Republic after all…

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Secret Service Shamed After Drunk Agents Assault Cab Driver in South Korea

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations.

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You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it.

For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression.

This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets.

Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident.

The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News.

Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver.

There could be more trouble coming, as well.

In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed.

One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed.

The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives.

“The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.”

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it. For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression. This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets. Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident. The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News. Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver. There could be more trouble coming, as well. In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed. One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed. The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives. “The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.” There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

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See No Evil Flags

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

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A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

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