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This Man Hopes You Never Announce An Act Of Kindness, The Reason Why Will Encourage You

Fox News, writer and attorney Joshua Rogers shared a personal anecdote about a small gift sent his way.

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It’s no doubt that one of my favorite kinds of stories to share with you is the random act of kindness. Strangers helping strangers, communities rallying behind the less fortunate, or even simple gestures that turn out to have a lasting impact.

These stories are great, but maybe you’ve noticed a common thread among them all: the giver, the good Samaritan, they practically never announce the good deed they’ve just done.

Instead, when a heartwarming act of kindness goes viral online, it’s often because that person was noticed by an onlooker, or perhaps even the recipient of the good deed thought they deserved recognition.

In a deeply insightful opinion piece for Fox News, writer and attorney Joshua Rogers shared a personal anecdote about a small gift sent his way, and why he hopes he never finds out who gave it.

A few years ago, I moved to a window office at work and sent an email around letting everyone know I had relocated. In the email, I jokingly invited everyone to come by for a “tour” of the new space and apologized that I didn’t have any hors d’oeuvres for my guests.

Well, I didn’t have hors d’oeuvres yet.

I was in a meeting that morning and when I got back to my office, there was a box of Dunkin’ Donuts on my desk. There was a note on it that was written in all caps and said, “Happy new office!” The person didn’t sign it or leave clues about who they were. I was so grateful for that.

A box of donuts. A small gesture, but a sweet one—literally. Because no one named themselves as the giver of this little gift, Rogers says he found himself “attributing all the goodwill to everyone in the office.” What wonders that must have done for office morale!

However, that’s not the lesson Rogers has in store for us. In fact, he contrasts it with an incident just a few weeks earlier when he failed to do what his anonymous co-worker had done, that is, to allow a small good deed to go unannounced.

The tide was steadily coming in, and on the shore, there were two nice beach chairs that were about to be taken out by the waves. The owners were nowhere to be seen, so I moved the chairs again and again as the tide rose. When the couple who owned the chairs finally showed up, I couldn’t help myself. I went over, pointed to the crashing waves, and said, “A couple of hours ago, your chairs were out there.”

There wasn’t any fanfare, nor was Rogers expecting it, but the owners of the chairs appreciated his help and thanked him for it.

No big deal, right?

Well, that moment caused Rogers to ponder the issue. As he walked away from the scene of his “magnanimous act of chair moving,” he says these words came to his mind: “You have your reward.”

What if the couple he’d just helped simply smiled and waved or even ignored him after he’d told them what he’d just done for them? If he had sought affirmation from the couple and not received it, he’d have set himself up to feel annoyed, bitter, or worse.

Rogers then points us to Matthew 6:2, in which Jesus says, “When you give to someone in need, don’t do as the hypocrites do – blowing trumpets in the … streets to call attention to their acts of charity! I tell you the truth, they have received all the reward they will ever get.”

People who “blow trumpets” to announce their kind deeds, even as small as moving some chairs or sending a box of donuts, are more often than not seeking affirmation and praise for themselves, Rogers contends.

“When someone gives anonymously, there’s total freedom. Nobody owes anybody else; nobody’s trying to manipulate; nobody has an agenda,” he continues. “They’re just giving for the sake of communicating an invaluable message: ‘You’re loved. Somebody cares about you. You’re important to someone and it has nothing to do with what you can give in return.’”

Instead, Rogers encourages us to experience the joy of anonymous giving, where “we leave the recipient with the holy mystery of who cares for them so much.”

“And in doing so,” he says, “we increase the likelihood that they will direct their gratitude towards God, who deserves the credit anyway.”

There are many, many ways, big or small, you can be a blessing to someone in your life. But when you give your gift, give it without announcement or expectation, and allow God to have the glory.

Opinion

Retirees Increasingly Ditching the Mortgage to Live on Cruise Ships

Sailing the seven seas in your seventies really does sound like serendipity. 

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Every now and then, a very unorthodox idea gets more than a few people scratching their heads and a movement is born.  This might just be the case with cruise ship retirements in the 21st century.

As it turns out, living nearly full-time on a cruise ship is far less expensive than one might imagine, especially when you start to compare the cost of living at home with the all-inclusive situation at sea.  And so much so that an increasing number of retirees are setting sail as opposed to settling down.

Serial cruiser and author Lee Wachtstetter, for instance, wrote a much-read memoir about living on cruise ships for 12 years after her husband died. Farschman, meanwhile, chronicles his sea-faring ventures on his blog — facilitated by on-board WiFi that’s “become so much more reliable, though sadly not necessarily more affordable,” he said.

Upgraded connectivity has also allowed semi-retired cruisers to be based at sea while still working. “The WiFi on most vessels is now strong enough for Zooms,” said Tara Bruce, a consultant and creative brand manager at Goodwin Investment Advisory Services, a Woodstock, Georgia-based financial advisory firm that helps folks retiring at sea.

In many ways, retiring on a cruise ship makes a lot of sense. Stereotypes aside, cruising has always appealed to older travelers. In fact, according to the Cruise Lines International Association, one-third of the 28.5 million people who took a cruise in 2018 were over 60 years old — and more than 50% were over 50 years old.

What’s more, cruise ships offer many of the essential elements seniors need to thrive: organized activities, a decent level of medical care and, most crucially, a built-in community of like-minded travelers.

And that’s not all:

“With cruising, you cover all of your living expenses — food, housing, entertainment — in one place,” said Bruce. Although pricing on luxury liners can inch towards $250 per day, “we’ve seen folks get costs down to $89 per day, which is far cheaper than assisted care or other kinds of senior living.”

Repeat cruisers like Farschman are also eligible for on-board credits towards premium meals, drinks, spas and other activities that can easily reach “hundreds of dollars per voyage,” Farschman said.

When you say it like that, sailing the seven seas in your seventies really does sound like serendipity.

Every now and then, a very unorthodox idea gets more than a few people scratching their heads and a movement is born.  This might just be the case with cruise ship retirements in the 21st century. As it turns out, living nearly full-time on a cruise ship is far less expensive than one might imagine, especially when you start to compare the cost of living at home with the all-inclusive situation at sea.  And so much so that an increasing number of retirees are setting sail as opposed to settling down. Serial cruiser and author Lee Wachtstetter, for instance, wrote a much-read memoir about living on cruise ships for 12 years after her husband died. Farschman, meanwhile, chronicles his sea-faring ventures on his blog — facilitated by on-board WiFi that’s “become so much more reliable, though sadly not necessarily more affordable,” he said. Upgraded connectivity has also allowed semi-retired cruisers to be based at sea while still working. “The WiFi on most vessels is now strong enough for Zooms,” said Tara Bruce, a consultant and creative brand manager at Goodwin Investment Advisory Services, a Woodstock, Georgia-based financial advisory firm that helps folks retiring at sea. In many ways, retiring on a cruise ship makes a lot of sense. Stereotypes aside, cruising has always appealed to older travelers. In fact, according to the Cruise Lines International Association, one-third of the 28.5 million people who took a cruise in 2018 were over 60 years old — and more than 50% were over 50 years old. What’s more, cruise ships offer many of the essential elements seniors need to thrive: organized activities, a decent level of medical care and, most crucially, a built-in community of like-minded travelers. And that’s not all: “With cruising, you cover all of your living expenses — food, housing,…

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Opinion

New Study Shows Eating Only During Daytime Has Wild Effect on Longevity

More bacon, less brussel sprouts…got it.

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The world has long been filled with fad diets and exercise gimmicks.  From the Stairmaster to the Atkins Diet, and from Bowflex to intermittent fasting, human beings will try just about anything to lose weight.

And while a great many of the actions we take to be leaner and healthier are rather drastic, (looking at you, liposuction), a new study seems to suggest that a simple adjustment to the time that we eat our meals could lengthen our lives significantly.

Eating primarily during the day instead of at night could be the key to a longer life, new research reveals. Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center say it’s not just what you consume, but when.

Their study finds that cutting down on fatty and sugary foods and having meals at the right time increased the longevity of mice by 35 percent. Experiments found the body clock’s daily rhythms play a big part in the benefits of a healthy diet. Rodents are nocturnal animals that are most active in the dark. Meanwhile, humans are generally livelier during the day. With that in mind, study authors say people should restrict their dining to the most active hours of the day.

The amount of extra life that these animals conjured was impressive.

In lab animals tracked over four years, a reduced-calorie diet alone extended survival by 10 percent. However, the improvement increased significantly with an exclusive nighttime feeding schedule. The combination tacked on an extra nine months to their typical two-year average lifespan.

And it really did seem that simple:

Lead author Professor Joseph Takahashi says a similar plan for people would restrict eating to the daytime hours. Eating less is known to boost health. Studies on a variety of animals have shown it can lead to a longer, healthier life. The latest findings add to the evidence that having a hearty breakfast or lunch instead of dinner is also key — at least for humans.

While the diet may take some getting used to for some, for others it just sounds like they’ll be having more bacon than brussel sprouts going forward.

The world has long been filled with fad diets and exercise gimmicks.  From the Stairmaster to the Atkins Diet, and from Bowflex to intermittent fasting, human beings will try just about anything to lose weight. And while a great many of the actions we take to be leaner and healthier are rather drastic, (looking at you, liposuction), a new study seems to suggest that a simple adjustment to the time that we eat our meals could lengthen our lives significantly. Eating primarily during the day instead of at night could be the key to a longer life, new research reveals. Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center say it’s not just what you consume, but when. Their study finds that cutting down on fatty and sugary foods and having meals at the right time increased the longevity of mice by 35 percent. Experiments found the body clock’s daily rhythms play a big part in the benefits of a healthy diet. Rodents are nocturnal animals that are most active in the dark. Meanwhile, humans are generally livelier during the day. With that in mind, study authors say people should restrict their dining to the most active hours of the day. The amount of extra life that these animals conjured was impressive. In lab animals tracked over four years, a reduced-calorie diet alone extended survival by 10 percent. However, the improvement increased significantly with an exclusive nighttime feeding schedule. The combination tacked on an extra nine months to their typical two-year average lifespan. And it really did seem that simple: Lead author Professor Joseph Takahashi says a similar plan for people would restrict eating to the daytime hours. Eating less is known to boost health. Studies on a variety of animals have shown it can lead to a longer, healthier life.…

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