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Trey Gowdy Defends the FBI Against Trump’s “Spy” Comments

Here’s Why.

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Trey Gowdy, the Senator from South Carolina who can always be counted on for some common sense in the political soap opera that is Washington, defended the FBI against Trump’s accusations of “spying” this week.

In an interview with CBS’ ‘This Morning’ on Wednesday, Gowdy said he saw no evidence there had been any wrongdoing on the part of the FBI and that Trump’s language was misleading.

“I don’t know what the FBI could have done or should have done other than run out a lead that someone loosely connected with the campaign was making assertions about Russia,” said Gowdy, who is the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

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“I think you would want the FBI to find whether or not there was any validity to what those people were saying,” he explained.

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“Think back to what the president himself told [former FBI Director] James Comey,” Gowdy continued. “He said, ‘I didn’t collude with Russia, but if anyone connected with my campaign did, I want you to investigate it.’ It strikes me that that’s exactly what the FBI was doing.”

When asked about Trump’s claim that a “spy” was placed in the Trump campaign, Gowdy said that was not the proper terminology for what the FBI had done.

“That is not a term I’ve ever used in the criminal justice system,” he explained. “I’ve never heard the term ‘spy’ used. Undercover informant, confidential informant, those are all words I’m familiar with. I’ve never heard the term spy used.”

“That’s an espionage term, it’s not a law enforcement term,” he added.

Gowdy, The Hill notes, is a former federal prosecutor and went on to defend the use of informants by law enforcement agencies, noting he couldn’t think of a major case he’d been involved with that hadn’t relied on confidential sources.

Gowdy, a former federal prosecutor, also defended the use of informants by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies, saying he couldn’t think of a major case he’d been involved in where confidential sources had not provided information. He emphasized it was up to law enforcement to decide what to do with that information.

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Not Peaceable or Patriotic

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2021

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A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2021 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.  

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Russia Completely Censors Navalny News After USA Issues Threat

Is Putin hiding Navalny to avoid further condemnation from the US?

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As Vladimir Putin continues to work up his reputation as the world’s most despicable and despotic leader, it appears as though he does have some jitters when it comes to dealing with the mighty USA. Over the course of the last several weeks, the two superpowers have exchanged a number of insults and threats, centered around any number of issues – all of which are of Putin’s own doing. First, US President Joe Biden went ahead and told the world that he believed Putin to be “a killer” – a statement that reportedly irked Putin to no end.  And then there were the hack attacks against the United States that saw Biden slap a number of hefty sanctions on Moscow. Now, as anti-Putin journalist Alexei Navalny continues a slow and agonizing march toward death at a Russian prison camp hospital, Biden and the US government have warned Putin that his demise could brings a world of pain to the Kremlin. This has pushed Putin to enact a total blackout of news on Navalny’s condition. Russian state TV has imposed a virtual blackout on coverage on Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny amid claims he could die at “any minute” in a prison hospital. The imprisoned 44-year-old, a prominent critic of President Vladimir Putin, has been on hunger strike and there are planned protests in 77 cities as a show of support. The protests on Wednesday will coincide with Vladimir Putin’s key annual state of the nation address to parliament. The Russian Government have said the protests are illegal. Putin and Biden had briefly considered a summit meeting to discuss this latest dissonance, but there is no telling where those negations stand after this latest malfeasance by the Russian government.

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