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REVEALED: New Poll Shows Vast Majority of Americans Are Against Impeachment of Trump

Ball’s in your court, libs.

John Salvatore

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Another day has come and gone without the impeachment of President Trump.

Democrats may still go forward with the process, but the vast majority of Americans are not in favor.

Will Dems care?

Trending: NYC Police Chief Confirms: Nearly ‘All’ Arrested Rioters Will Be Released Without Bail

Here’s the scoop

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The majority of American voters oppose impeachment, according to the latest Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey.

Of the 1,295 registered voters polled, only 37 percent support impeaching and removing President Trump from office. While 43 percent favor “no action,” 60 percent of Democrat voters believe Trump should be impeached and removed altogether. However, independents are not on board:

Thirty-seven percent support impeaching and removing the president. Sixty percent of polled Democrats say the president should be impeached and removed, but only 36 percent of independents are in favor. Twenty percent of voters say Trump should be censured by Congress.

After calling for Trump’s impeachment, a pro-Trump state representative said he would challenge Republican Rep. Justin Amash for his seat in 2020.

Then, Amash doubled down.

He said wouldn’t rule out a third-party run for president.

Now, Justin has set his sights on AG Bill Barr.

LOOK:

Attorney General Barr has deliberately misrepresented key aspects of Mueller’s report and decisions in the investigation, which has helped further the president’s false narrative about the investigation.

Mueller’s report says he chose not to decide whether Trump broke the law because there’s an official DoJ opinion that indicting a sitting president is unconstitutional, and because of concerns about impacting the president’s ability to govern and pre-empting possible impeachment.

But, in fact, Mueller finds considerable evidence that several of Trump’s actions detailed in the report meet the elements of obstruction, and Mueller’s constitutional and prudential issues with indicting a sitting president would preclude indictment regardless of what he found.

Barr quotes Mueller saying the evidence didn’t establish that Trump was personally involved in crimes related to Russian election interference, and Barr then claims that Mueller found that fact relevant to whether the president had the intent to obstruct justice.

As a result of Barr’s March 24 letter, the public and Congress were misled. Mueller himself notes this in a March 27 letter to Barr, saying that Barr’s letter “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance of this Office’s work and conclusions.”

To “alleviate the misunderstandings that have arisen,” Mueller urged the release of the report’s introductions and executive summaries, which he had told Barr “accurately summarize [Mueller’s] Office’s work and conclusions.”

Barr was asked about reports “that members of [Mueller’s] team are frustrated…with the limited information included in your March 24th letter, that it does not adequately or accurately necessarily portray the report’s findings. Do you know what they’re referencing with that?”

In subsequent statements and testimony, Barr used further misrepresentations to help build the president’s false narrative that the investigation was unjustified.

But whether there’s enough evidence for a conviction of a specific crime which Mueller thought was appropriate to charge is a different and much higher standard than whether the people whom Mueller investigated had done anything worthy of investigation.

For instance, Trump Jr., Paul Manafort, and Jared Kushner took a meeting with a Russian lawyer whom Trump Jr. had been told worked for the Russian government and would provide documents to “incriminate Hillary,” as part of the Russian government’s “support for Mr. Trump.”

Barr says the White House “fully cooperated” with the investigation and that Mueller “never sought” or “pushed” to get more from the president, but the report says Mueller unsuccessfully sought an interview with the president for over a year.

The president instead gave written answers to questions submitted by the special counsel. Those answers are often incomplete or unresponsive. Mueller found them “inadequate” and again sought to interview the president.

Barr has so far successfully used his position to sell the president’s false narrative to the American people. This will continue if those who have read the report do not start pushing back on his misrepresentations and share the truth.

Save conservative media!

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Trump Steps Back From Insurrection Act, But Not Before Military Leaders Issue Strong Rebuke

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President Donald Trump has signaled that he is going to step back from threats he’s made concerning the deployment of federal troops to states that are refusing to use the military to quell riots and violent protests, but not before leaders in the military issued sharp rebukes for his position on the matter. Trump spoke with with former White House spokesman Sean Spicer on Newsmax TV Wednesday saying, “I don’t think we’ll have to,” referring, of course, to the invoking of the Insurrection Act, which would dispatch active-duty military troops on the streets to help reign in the current chaos. “We have very strong powers to do it. The National Guard is customary, and we have a very powerful National Guard, over 300,000 men and women, and we can do pretty much whatever we want as far as that,” the president said. “But as far as going beyond that, sure, if it was necessary.” via The Washington Examiner: On a leaked call Monday, Trump called governors “weak” and urged them, with the backing of Defense Secretary Mark Esper and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley, to call up more National Guard members to quell protests in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody. “If a city or state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them,” he said. Esper went on to say on Wednesday morning that the military lexicon was inappropriate. “I’ve always believed and continue to believe that the National Guard is best suited for performing domestic support to civil authorities in these situations,” Esper stated. “I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act.” The former National Guardsman…

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Lindsey Graham Weighs In On Mattis Criticism of Trump, Says He’s ‘Buying Into A Narrative’

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South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on some rather brutal comments made by former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis about President Donald Trump, stating that he was “buying into a narrative” after slamming the president for his handling of the riots and protests in light of the death of George Floyd. Graham made an appearance on Fox & Friends where he said that Mattis isn’t understanding, despite the several years he spent serving in his administration, that Trump is the victim of a political blame game. “The one thing I would tell Gen. Mattis is that you don’t quite understand that from the time President Trump wakes up until he goes to bed, there’s an effort to destroy his presidency. … Nobody wants to send active-duty troops into American cities unless they are invited and unless they are absolutely necessary,” Graham said during the interview. Here’s more from The Washington Examiner: “But I would say that Gov. Cuomo should have called out the National Guard early on, and I would ask Gen. Mattis to look at the behavior of the politicians in these cities and see if you can find fault with them,” he said, referring to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. “It is so fashionable to blame President Trump for every wrong in America, and he can be a handful, and can he do better? Yes. But the problems we have in America today weren’t caused by Donald Trump, and hopefully, he can help the nation heal some of these problems.” Mattis claimed that Trump was ordering the National Guard to “violate the constitutional rights of their fellow citizens” so that the president could have a “bizarre photo op” in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church near the White House on Monday. Trump responded to Mattis’s condemnation by tweeting,…

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