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Washington Football Team Makes Major Decision on Future Name

One of the frontrunners for the new name was just eliminated.

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For the Washington Football Team, the process of choosing a new name has been a long and arduous one not entirely void of embarrassment and comedy.

The team, formerly known as the racially-insensitive “Redskins”, was unable to come to a consensus regarding a new name before the 2020 season began, thus becoming the “Washington Football Team”.  This bland, almost comically-mundane name was the butt of a great many jokes, and the team has yet to determine what their next name will be.

This week, they at least announced that they had made some progress in their hunt for a new moniker, but not much.

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Washington’s president Jason Wright said in a release on the team’s website that the new name will not feature anything related to Native Americans. Wright said the new name should bring in more people to support the team and that the new name shouldn’t be offensive to anyone.

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“With this in mind, we made it a priority to run an inclusive process to listen to all voices. We have given particular emphasis to engaging, listening and learning from Native American leaders and individuals throughout the country,” Wright said. “This process has exposed to us the very deeply-held personal feelings about our previous imagery and association – and not just the simple, easy-to-categorize ‘who’s for or who’s against’ polling of our old name, but research revealing the psychological effects of Native American team names on American Indian and Alaska Native youth.

“In sum, this engagement demonstrated to us a consensus that moving forward with no ties to Native American imagery is the right path. I am personally and deeply grateful for the Native American community leaders who engaged with us, sharing painful, raw and real stories that persist to this day. Their stories affirmed our decision to move in a new direction in the creation of our new name and identity, and we are proudly forging ahead in this journey with a promise to our community – a promise to continue to be inclusive in our process and collaborative with our fans.”

The announcement means that the possible name “Warriors” was now out of the running, on account of the potential for the word to conjure what the team felt was inappropriate  imagery.

 

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International Athletic Authorities Set to Review Marijuana Use Policies

The marijuana revolution is going global.

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Things are changing rapidly within society here in the 21st century, as our governing bodies finally begin to take a look at some long-held, but naive beliefs about certain medical plants. In the United States, for instance, the marijuana revolution is happening right before our eyes, as more than half the states in the nation now allow citizens to indulge in some form of legal, medicinal, or decriminalized use of the plant.  About a third of the states even allow for recreational use, and those locales have been enjoying both incredible tax revenues from the highly-regulated sale of legal weed, as well as the societal benefits that come along with – including a sharp decrease in the use of more dangerous drugs. Now it appears as though this sentiment is going global. Sebastian Coe wants to ensure what happened this month to American sprinter Sha’Carri Richardson won’t knock another athlete out of the Olympics in the future. Richardson, who won the 100 meters at the U.S. trials last month, didn’t travel to Japan for the Tokyo Games after being caught smoking marijuana. Coe, the president of international track body World Athletics, said Tuesday the absence of the 21-year-old Richardson is “a loss to the competition” and added he supports a review of marijuana’s status as a doping substance in light of her case. And he wasn’t mincing his words. “It should be. It’s sensible,” Coe said when asked if a rethink was needed about marijuana being on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s prohibited list. “Nothing is set in tablets of stone,” said Coe, who has asked track’s independent Athletics Integrity Unit to work with WADA. “You adapt and occasionally reassess.” Congressional leaders on both sides of the aisle have expressed optimism that a new bill meant to decriminalize marijuana at the…

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US Pop Star Offers to Pay Fines For Olympic Team Protesting Skimpy Outfits

The IOC wants the women to remain scantily clad, and this is undoubtedly on account of their incessant greed.

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The Olympics may have built themselves as some sort of prestigious and untouchable global event in years past, but the last few decades have revealed just what a shady cash-grab the games have become. It all began in the 90’s when the financially-struggling Winter Olympics added snowboarding to the games, in a move that was blatantly meant to generate ad revenue from the emerging sport and its fans.  In this quest to cash in, the International Olympic Committee refused to allow any actual snowboarding organizations participate in the operations, which drove several of the world’s best to boycott.  This, in turn, completely ruined the concept that the gold medalists were truly the best in the world, and exposed the IOC as nothing more than a marketing firm. Now, in 2021, a number of female athletes are complaining that they are being forced to wear skimpier clothes than their male counterparts, (often in the same discipline), to which the IOC responded with a “be quiet and play” sort of attitude. Again, the skimpier outfits equate to more ratings, so Olympic organizers are refusing to make accommodations. This has led US pop star Pink to step up.  US pop star Pink has offered to pay the fines handed out to the Norwegian women’s beach handball team, after they wore shorts like their male counterparts instead of bikini bottoms. The team was fined 1,500 euros (£1,295) for “improper clothing” at the European Beach Handball Championships last week. “I’m very proud of the Norwegian female beach handball team for protesting sexist rules about their uniform,” tweeted the singer on Sunday. “Good on ya, ladies,” she added. “I’ll be happy to pay your fines for you. Keep it up.” In doing so, the Olympics will get their coveted cash and these female athletes will be able to perform…

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