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Watch: Massive Police Chase Caught on Video After Riverside County Sheriff's Deputy Murdered

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Dozens of police vehicles chased the suspect in a shooting of a deputy sheriff on California’s I-15 freeway on Thursday.

Authorities said the incident began around 2 p.m when an armed man opened fire at Riverside County Sheriff’s Deputy Isaiah Cordero in Jurupa Valley during a traffic stop, fatally wounding him, according to The Desert Sun.

A witness to the shooting called 911, sparking the manhunt, according to the report.

Video of the pursuit reveals a massive group of police chasing the suspect.

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The chase of the suspect proceeded through both Riverside and San Bernardino counties, according to KTLA-TV.

The suspect died amid gunfire from police at the end of the chase.

Riverside County Sheriff Chad Bianco said the man opened fire at the police pursuing him before being neutralized, according to KTLA.

A massive impromptu memorial procession of law enforcement traveled through Riverside County the night of Cordero’s killing.

Bianco identified the deceased suspect as 44-year old William Shae McKay, according to KTLA.

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He indicated that McKay has an extensive criminal history with convictions of kidnapping, robbery and multiple assaults.

McKay was spared a prison sentence of 25 years to life by a California judge after a third felony conviction earlier this year, according to Bianco.

“This terrible tragedy should have been prevented by the legal system,” the sheriff said of Cordero’s murder.

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“We would not be here today if the judge had done her job.”

McKay had been convicted of felony false imprisonment, evading a police officer and making criminal threats in November, according to the Desert Sun.

It wasn’t immediately clear which judge the sheriff was referring to.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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