Connect with us

News

What Does The Carter Page FISA Warrant Really Mean? Ben Shapiro Breaks it Down

Published

on

Over the weekend, the FBI released the FISA warrant application against Trump foreign policy advisor Carter Page, heavily redacted, to the public. Much of the information that was contained in the document was already known, with hundreds of pages of material being blacked out.

Many folks are wondering if there is anything significant that has now been added to the conversation by the release of the document. Daily Wire’s Ben Shapiro breaks down what we can learn from this being released.

1. The FBI Relied Heavily on The So-Called Steele Dossier. The dossier compiled by British spy Christopher Steele at the behest of the Hillary Clinton campaign and Fusion GPS was allegedly handed over to the FBI in September 2016, and served as a key component of the FISA warrant application. It didn’t play a minor role; it played a major role. With that said, most of the Steele dossier had to do with Trump and onetime Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort – and none of that material appears in the application.

2. We Don’t Know How Much The Dossier Was Corroborated. Republicans have suggested that the Steele dossier was used in its entirety and was not corroborated in any way. We simply don’t know that, since corroborating details could be found behind the redactions. If the FBI simply used the Steele dossier without any corroboration, that would certainly be troubling.

3. The Nunes Memo Suggestion That The Application Didn’t Contain Warnings About The Source of The Steele Dossier Is Wrong. Dueling interpretations of the memo by House Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes (R-CA) have emerged. On the one hand, Byron York of The Washington Examiner says that Nunes was correct – that the funding of the Steele dossier wasn’t fully conveyed to the Court. On the other hand, the application contains clear references to “Candidate #1” being targeted by “Candidate #2.” In my opinion, it’s a massive stretch to suggest that the court didn’t know that Hillary had paid for the dossier. The application openly states that a “US-based law firm had hired the identified US person to conduct research regarding Candidate #1’s ties to Russia…The identified US person hired Source #1 to conduct this research. The identified US person never advised Source #1 as to the motivation behind the research into Candidate #1’s ties to Russia. The FBI speculates that the identified US person was likely looking for information that could be used to discredit Candidate #1’s campaign.”

This is just a few of the points Shapiro mentions. If you want to see his complete list of six, you can see his full post at the Daily Wire. The link is down below.

The bottom line is this doesn’t really give us a whole lot that we didn’t already have before, thus nothing in this document is going to change your mind one way or the other.

As Shapiro notes in his piece, the real question is why Trump doesn’t just make the document completely declassified if it really contains what he says it contains? Let’s put this to bed and move on to bigger and better things.

Source: The Daily Wire

News

Secret Service Shamed After Drunk Agents Assault Cab Driver in South Korea

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations.

Published

on

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it.

For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression.

This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets.

Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident.

The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News.

Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver.

There could be more trouble coming, as well.

In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed.

One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed.

The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives.

“The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.”

There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

You can tell a lot about a White House by the extracurricular nonsense that hits the press surrounding it. For instance, after one of President Joe Biden’s dogs began biting random people on the grounds, we started hearing murmurs of just how terse and stressful the place had become, with dog behavior experts suggesting that the mood at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might have a lot to do with the aggression. This week, the Biden administration beget more bad behavior, but this time it wasn’t from one of the First Pets. Two U.S. Secret Service agents in South Korea were sent stateside ahead of President Biden’s arrival following their involvement in an off-duty alcohol-related incident. The two agents, whose identities have not been made public, are on their way back to Washington, D.C. where they will face disciplinary action, a source familiar with the matter told Fox News. Both agents apparently became intoxicated while not on duty. One of the agents then got into an altercation with a cab driver. There could be more trouble coming, as well. In South Korea, officials send mediators to the scene of low-level disputes and then determine if criminal charges would be filed. One of the agents was interviewed by authorities and no charges have been filed. The government released one of its usual, dry, boilerplate-esque missives. “The Secret Service is aware of an off-duty incident involving two employees which may constitute potential policy violations,” USSS chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told Fox News. “We have very strict protocols and policies for all employees and we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards.” There is a history of poor behavior from the Secret Service during Democratic administrations, with a notable incident having occurred in 2012, involving Barack Obama’s agents and a Colombian prostitute.

Continue Reading

News

See No Evil Flags

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

Published

on

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022

See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

A Political Cartoon By A.F. Branco Exclusively for Flag and Cross ©2022 See more A.F. Branco cartoons on his website Comically Incorrect.

Continue Reading

Latest Articles

Best of the Week