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'Wheel of Fortune' Fans Stunned After Pat Sajak Rudely Shuts Down Contestant

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As the wheel of life turns, some days they love you, some days they don’t.

That’s true for “Wheel of Fortune” host Pat Sajak, who irked some fans when he gave a less-than-flattering reaction to one contestant’s story.

During a recent episode of the long-running game show, Sajak, 75, glanced down at his card about contestant Scott Ingwersen and noted that Ingwersen had told interviewers he once chopped off a big toe, according to the New York Post.

“Why am I mentioning this?” Sajak said. “It’s on your card. You had your big toe chopped off. Why are you telling this?”

Ingwersen, 47, told the tale of a childish mishap.

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“It’s important to know that when I was 12 years old, I was riding a 10-speed bike with flip-flops, and I fell and completely cut off the top of my toe,” Ingwersen said.

“The next car that came by were two paramedics that were on their way to their job, and they said, ‘It’s just a laceration.’ But I didn’t know what that was, so it freaked me out even more. And my toe is reattached, and I just wanna say ‘thank you’ to them 30 years later,” he said.

The audience, as audiences do, applauded.

Sajak then ended that abruptly.

“That may have been the most pointless story ever told. And you told it, Scott. Congratulations to you,” he said.

While some saw it as an attempt at humor, many others pounced on Sajak.

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Sajak had shown a different side earlier this month when contestants struggled with a puzzle the folks at home knew was easy.

Was Pat Sajak out of line?

“It always pains me when nice people come on our show to play a game and win some money and maybe fulfill a lifelong dream, and are then subject to online ridicule when they make a mistake or something goes awry,” he said then.

Sajak added, “I’ve been praised online for ‘keeping it together’ and not making fun of the players. Truth is, all I want to do is help to get them through it and convince them that those things happen even to very bright people.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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