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Will Millennials Be the Change to Our Nation’s High Divorce Rates?

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Millennials are a controversial generation.

Today’s twenty- and thirty-somethings seem to both vex older generations for their lack of work ethic, over-dependence on technology, and apparent inability to pick up the reigns of our economy.

On the other hand, there’s also a lot of evidence to indicate that millennials are the driving force behind some important social changes in our nation after decades of influence by the wild children of the Baby Boomer generation.

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Millennials tend to oppose abortion more than their parents, something that seems rather contrary to the current rhetoric of our day.

Millennials are more likely to be politically conservative than their parents, perhaps because the only way to rebel from parents who were themselves rebels in their day is to reform.

Now, the BBC reports, new research is showing that while millennials are less likely to marry than their parents, those who do are significantly less likely to get divorced than their parents.

Between 2008 and 2016 the divorce rate in the US fell by 18%, according to a report from the University of Maryland.

The author put it down partly to people born between 1980 and the mid-1990s getting divorced at a lower rate than their baby boomer parents.

“Marriage has become more selective, and more stable, even as attitudes toward divorce are becoming more permissive,” the report suggested.

Millennials are three times less likely to marry than their grandparents, but those who do tie the knot appear to be staying together.

This is an interesting trend in a generation that was raised amid high divorce rates and an increasingly jaded view of marriage.

I would offer that perhaps many millennials tend to no longer view marriage as anything very significant, choosing instead long-term, semi-committed relationships with squishy definitions and an easy out.

While on the other hand, other millennials observe what they believe to be a negative impact the lack of regard for the sanctity of marriage has had on our culture and endeavor to take it more seriously than their parents’ generation.

Either way, it’s good news that divorce is becoming less common. The tides of culture may constantly change, but the sacred institution of marriage as defined by God never will.

 

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