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Young Girl Saves Neighbors' Puppy After Noticing Something Strange Coming from House

Western Journal

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On the evening of Sept. 4, 11-year-old Mackenzie Jenkins was sitting on a swing outside her Cape Coral, Florida, home when she spotted something suspicious going on at her neighbor’s house.

“I came outside to play on my swing and then I saw smoke coming out of the roof, and the front door and the bedroom window,” Mackenzie told WINK-TV.

She saw smoke but she also heard Fiona — the neighbors’ black-and-white, 8-month-old puppy — barking, and she was worried for the dog’s safety.

“I was scared,” Mackenzie said. “I, I was mostly scared about Fiona, because I didn’t want her to die.”

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It was around 6:45 when Fiona raced to call 911 and provide the address, and firefighters soon were on their way.

“Then Engines 2 and 3, Ladder 1, Truck 4, Rescues 3 and 4, and Battalions 1 and 2 responded to a residential structure fire and, thanks to the quick actions of 11-year-old Mackenzie Jenkins, were able to save a 6-month-old puppy named Fiona,” the Cape Coral Fire Department posted Sept. 6.



“When firefighters were able to make entry, they knew to search for a dog thanks to the information provided by Mackenzie,” the post read.

“Fiona was unresponsive when firefighters found her, but Lee County EMS cooled her and provided oxygen, and by the time the fire was out, she was up and walking around!”

The neighbors hadn’t been home at the time of the incident, but thanks to Mackenzie’s observation, quick actions and thorough description, Fiona was saved and the fire was extinguished.

“They just said that they were happy that I saved the dog and the house,” she said, “cause the fire could have gotten worse if I didn’t call in the next five minutes.”

The cause of the fire was later determined to be a lithium battery charger.

Now, the girl is being hailed as a hero by her family, the neighbors, the fire department and complete strangers.



“Firefighters presented Mackenzie with a Community Recognition Coin for her actions which not only prevented further damage to her neighbor’s home from the fire but saved their dog’s life,” the fire department’s post continued. “Great job, Mackenzie!!”

“The dog is fortunately doing great,” public affairs specialist Andrea Schuch said, according to Fox News. “She was originally unresponsive when firefighters found her, but EMS cooled her and gave her oxygen and she woke up and was walking around before the fire was even out.”



“That just shows how important Mackenzie’s call was … if she had waited or hadn’t called, Fiona, the dog, wouldn’t have made it (and there would have been more damage to the house).”

“Mackenzie could hear the dog barking so that was her concern,” Mackenzie’s great-grandfather, Michael Jenkins, added. “I was very proud of her. Very proud.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

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People Now Financing Pizza, Single Cups of Coffee in Bizarre Financial Dystopia

Western Journal

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In the past during times of economic hardship, people would scrimp and save everything they could.

Cents were carefully counted and stashed away in hidden jars, bacon fat was stored to grease tomorrow’s cooking, and the seeds from dinner vegetables were extracted and used to grow another crop of food.

Back then, if you couldn’t afford a cup of coffee, the solution was simple — you just didn’t get a cup of coffee. In our progressive new modern age, however, things have taken a worrying turn.

As the cost of fuel and food continues to creep up at home and around the world, ceaseless inflation and supply chain crises appear primed to take the world back to the dark days of widespread economic hardship.

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But in our brave new society, this doesn’t mean you have to go without pizza being delivered or your usual Starbucks order.

Blame it on the “I want it now” culture, a lack of understanding about the value of money or even plain old financial illiteracy, but people in the United Kingdom now have the option to finance a cup of joe if they don’t have the cash to cover it.

You read that right. Thanks to a new service, everything from restaurant meals to vacation experiences can easily be financed. While this eliminates the pesky need to save up for a pizza, debtors will be required to pay back the pie in weekly installments.

Zilch is offering its “buy now, pay later” model to U.K. citizens free of fees in thousands of locations, including Ikea, Disneyland and Uber Eats.

In places not yet partnering with the financing service, you can expect to rack up 11.5% APR on your purchase — no matter how small.

The difference between this and a credit card appears to be in the repayment scheme, which is automatically broken up into regular weekly payments for a term, according to information from Zilch.

And if you think it’s hyperbole to say people are actually using this service to finance single cups of coffee, take a look at an ad from the company actively encouraging people to go into debt for one.

Now, this isn’t to say that there’s no good use for financing certain purchases.

Houses, for example, are one thing that is nearly always financed. Unless somebody has $150,000 on hand, most turn to banks or credit unions for the funds to make the investment.

Many of the cars you see on the road are financed as well, although people do often save up and purchase vehicles outright.

With that being said, there’s a clear disconnect between people taking on debt for a home and people saddling themselves with payments for the newest clothes and a burger from McDonald’s.

In a world facing radical economic transformations, it seems now is the worst time possible to become indebted for a cup of coffee.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

In the past during times of economic hardship, people would scrimp and save everything they could. Cents were carefully counted and stashed away in hidden jars, bacon fat was stored to grease tomorrow’s cooking, and the seeds from dinner vegetables were extracted and used to grow another crop of food. Back then, if you couldn’t afford a cup of coffee, the solution was simple — you just didn’t get a cup of coffee. In our progressive new modern age, however, things have taken a worrying turn. As the cost of fuel and food continues to creep up at home and around the world, ceaseless inflation and supply chain crises appear primed to take the world back to the dark days of widespread economic hardship. But in our brave new society, this doesn’t mean you have to go without pizza being delivered or your usual Starbucks order. Blame it on the “I want it now” culture, a lack of understanding about the value of money or even plain old financial illiteracy, but people in the United Kingdom now have the option to finance a cup of joe if they don’t have the cash to cover it. You read that right. Thanks to a new service, everything from restaurant meals to vacation experiences can easily be financed. While this eliminates the pesky need to save up for a pizza, debtors will be required to pay back the pie in weekly installments. Zilch is offering its “buy now, pay later” model to U.K. citizens free of fees in thousands of locations, including Ikea, Disneyland and Uber Eats. In places not yet partnering with the financing service, you can expect to rack up 11.5% APR on your purchase — no matter how small. The difference between this and a credit card appears to be…

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Small Ranchers Band Together to Seize Control Back from Beef Industry Megacorporations

Western Journal

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There is nothing more American than that moment when the guys at the bottom send a message to the guys at the top: We’re changing the rules.

So it is in the cattle industry, where ranchers who have been getting less and less are now uniting to build meat packing plants, according to Fox News.

Since the 1970s, four companies have had a stranglehold on the beef industry by running slaughterhouses that process more than 80 percent of the country’s cattle.

Ranchers, who in the 1970s got 35 cents out of every dollar consumers spent on food, now get 14 cents.

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Consumers got a glimpse of the impact of consolidation earlier this year when meat packing giant JBS stopped operations at 13 plants after a cyberattack, according to CBS. The company ended up forking over about $11 million in order to resume operations.

Rancher Rusty Kemp of Nebraska said he and others decided it was time to quit complaining and start competing.

“We’ve been complaining about it for 30 years,” Kemp told Fox. “It’s probably time somebody does something about it.”

This fall, a dream that was $300 million in the making will take shape as construction begins on the Sustainable Beef plant on nearly 400 acres near North Platte, Nebraska.

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is a fan, saying ranchers and consumers both win.

“Ranchers have been getting screwed long enough, it is time we fight back. This is how we do it, we go head to head with the big processors,” he said.

Kemp said the project will bring growth to the region with a plant expected to employ about 900 people.

“If we are going to grow this economy, it needs to be through added value agriculture,” Kemp said, according to KNOP-TV. “We need to take the ag products we produce in Lincoln County and the surrounding area – the North Platte trade area, and add value to it. That’s how we grow our economy here.”

Even the Biden administration has raised questions. White House National Economic Council Director Brian Deese said price hikes for meat may have been driven by profiteering, according to the New York Post.

“It raises a concern about pandemic profiteering, about companies that are driving price increases in a way that hurts consumers who are going to the grocery store,” Deese said last month

David Briggs, the CEO of Sustainable Beef, said the battle will not be easy, but he is up for it.

“Cattle people are risk-takers and they’re ready to take a risk,” Briggs told Fox News.

Chad Tentinger, who is working to unite cattle ranchers and build a Cattlemen’s Heritage plant near Council Bluffs, Iowa, said he thinks the small ranchers can beat the big guys.

“We want to revolutionize the plant and make it an attractive place to work,” he said.

More modern facilities and better pay are two of the pieces they hope will let them compete.

Derrell Peel, an agricultural economist at Oklahoma State University, said bigger plants historically have greater efficiency, which means lower costs.

“We have these very large plants because they’re extremely efficient,” Peel said.

But Kemp said he will give it a try.

“The market is what it is, and it provides opportunities as well as challenges,” Kemp said, according to the North Platte Telegraph.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

There is nothing more American than that moment when the guys at the bottom send a message to the guys at the top: We’re changing the rules. So it is in the cattle industry, where ranchers who have been getting less and less are now uniting to build meat packing plants, according to Fox News. Since the 1970s, four companies have had a stranglehold on the beef industry by running slaughterhouses that process more than 80 percent of the country’s cattle. Ranchers, who in the 1970s got 35 cents out of every dollar consumers spent on food, now get 14 cents. Consumers got a glimpse of the impact of consolidation earlier this year when meat packing giant JBS stopped operations at 13 plants after a cyberattack, according to CBS. The company ended up forking over about $11 million in order to resume operations. Rancher Rusty Kemp of Nebraska said he and others decided it was time to quit complaining and start competing. “We’ve been complaining about it for 30 years,” Kemp told Fox. “It’s probably time somebody does something about it.” This fall, a dream that was $300 million in the making will take shape as construction begins on the Sustainable Beef plant on nearly 400 acres near North Platte, Nebraska. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is a fan, saying ranchers and consumers both win. “Ranchers have been getting screwed long enough, it is time we fight back. This is how we do it, we go head to head with the big processors,” he said. Kemp said the project will bring growth to the region with a plant expected to employ about 900 people. “If we are going to grow this economy, it needs to be through added value agriculture,” Kemp said, according to KNOP-TV. “We need to take the…

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